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ANGLO-AMERICANS - U.S. PRESIDENTIAL ALSO-RANS

PATHWAY OF THE POLITICIAN AS EGGHEAD IDEALIST:
Storyline: The cerebral reformer proves himself to be a man of words, more than actions, giving eloquent voice to the issues of his times, without the muscle to make his principles national policy, thanks to an unwillingness to get down and dirty in the nitty-gritty arena of implementation and actualization.

Adlai E. Stevenson II (1900-1965) - American politician. Outer: Grandson of political namesake and vice-president Adlai E. Stevenson (Sargent Shriver). His father also harbored desires for that office, although never rose higher than Secretary of State of Illinois. Spent his first 6 years on the West Coast, because of his sire’s health considerations. When he was 6, his parents moved to Illinois to run the family newspaper, “The Daily Pantagraph,” when he was young. Accidentally killed a 12 year old girl, while showing off his brother’s .22 caliber rifle at a Christmas party, and remained guilty about the incident forever after, making him a compulsive do-gooder. A slow reader, he read comparatively little, and learned far more by listening, somewhat blunting his supposed vaunted intellectual abilities. Attended high school, then the Choate school, where he was active in sports and journalism, before enlisting in the Navy in 1918. 5’10”. On his discharge, he went to Princeton Univ. where he became managing editor of the Daily Princetonian, and upon graduating, went to Harvard Law School, at his sire’s urging, although dropped out after two years. Wrote for the family newspaper, which his maternal great grandfather had founded, and then got his law degree at Northwestern Univ. in 1926, passing the Illinois bar the same year. Went to work for an old conservative Chicago law firm, and had an active social life in the city. Married a wealthy but self-centered and unstable socialite, Ellen Borden, in 1928, three sons from union, including one of the same name, who became a U.S. senator. In 1933, he became special council to a government agricultural agency. Returned to his law practice the following year, and also became involved in host of political and civic organizations, while buying a huge tract of rural land and building a home, but rarely staying there, which fed into his ultimate divorce in 1950. Never remarried, although he was subsequently connected to several high profile women, including Marietta Tree and publisher Katherine Graham. In 1941, he was made special assistant to the Secretary of Navy, allowing him to visit various theaters of war. On the Secretary’s death in 1944, he returned to Chicago, and tried to buy the Chicago Daily News, but his group was outbid. Became personal assistant to the Secretary of State, which involved him in the founding of the United Nations, then served as a senior advisor and alternate delegate during its first 3 sessions. In 1948, despite being relatively unknown in the state, he won a landslide victory in the Illinois governor’s race, with the mantra, “I am not a politician, I am a citizen,” and immediately began reforming the corrupt and scandal-ridden state, proving himself a talented administrator, and a hard worker. Although he did not harbor higher political ambitions, he was drafted at the 1952 Democratic convention to face popular war hero Dwight D. Eisenhower, and was subsequently defeated by almost a 5 to 1 margin in the electoral vote, despite his highly eloquent campaign speeches, in which he attacked the scourge of McCarthyism, while promoting his Democratic predecessor’s New Deal and Fair Deal. While he greatly appealed to intellectual America, who professed to “love Adlai madly,” the rest of the hero-besotted electorate liked Ike better, and he wound up being roundly ridiculed as an “egghead,” thanks to America’s ongoing predisposition against people who shine too brightly cerebrally. Code-named Deacon by the Secret Service, who later gave that name to Jimmy Carter. The most famous totem he left from the campaign, was a picture of his shoe with a hole in it. Traveled widely afterwards, and in 1956, he once again was given the thankless Democratic nod, after campaigning vigorously for it only to lose to Eisenhower by an even greater margin, thanks to a liberal agenda and a complacent country quite content with its popular Republican head of state because of its fairly robust economy. Returned to his law practice afterwards, and mulled over a third try, then refused to give the nominating speech for John F. Kennedy, the eventual nominee and winner, who denied him the coveted position of Secretary of State, although he was made U.S. ambassador to the United Nations in the new administration, and held that position until his death. The Kennedys privately held him in contempt as a man of thought rather than action, although he gave a dramatic challenge to the Soviets around the Cuban missile crisis of 1962. Also assaulted by an anti-U.N. protester in Dallas a month before Kennedy’s assassination there. A smoker, he also suffered from arteriosclerosis and hypertension, while paying little attention to his health. Died suddenly of heart failure while walking down a street in London. Wrote several books, and tried to serve as America’s conscience during a time of torpor and complacency. Inner: Liberal, principled and highly eloquent, with a legendary wit and great charm. Saw America as “the last best hope” for the world, and worked towards that end, as a teacher of sorts of what the country could be capable of. Put nobility of self over political victory and was greatly conflicted over exercising personal power. Guilt-tinged lifetime of trying to uplift a resistant country to his higher vision, at a time when it preferred easy fixes to complex questions & answers that strained its complacent view of itself. James G. Blaine (1830-1893) - American politician and diplomat. Outer: Father was a businessman and Presbyterian of Scotch-Irish descent. Mother was a Roman Catholic of Irish descent. One sister became a nun. Showed himself to be both bright and articulate as a youngster. After graduating from Washington College in 1847, he taught school while studying law. Secretly married Harriet Stanwood, a teacher, in 1850, then officially wed her the following year, while moving to Maine, where, through his wife’s brothers, he bought and edited the Kennebec Journal, a crusading Republican paper, before deciding that politics would be a better venue for himself. Served in the state legislature for an additional 3 years, and as its speaker for his last two years. Became chairman of the state’s Republican committee in 1859, and as such, directed every campaign for the next 20 plus years, winning him the sobriquet of “the Plumed Knight,” by his admirers. In 1862, he was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, serving until 1876 in that capacity, and as speaker for the last 7 years of it, showing himself to be a gifted debater, with a good sense of repartee, and an aggressive proponent of Republican Party politics, spearheading the passage of the 14th Amendment, which gave freed male slaves the right to vote. Took a moderate stance on Reconstruction during this period, and in 1876, seemed to be a leading candidate for the Republican nomination for the presidency. The publication of an incriminating set of letters, however, linked him to congressional favors for a railroad, and besmirched his name, although he was exonerated of the charge, only to lose the nomination to Rutherford B. Hayes (Jimmy Carter). After being appointed to fulfill a vacancy and then elected to the U.S. Senate, he was tapped by Pres. James Garfield (Coretta Scott King) to be his secretary of state. Pursued an active foreign policy, as he tried to make Latin American trade strictly an American affair, blocking European inroads there. Resigned after Garfield’s assassination, for which he was present, and in 1884, became the Republican presidential nominee, although he remained dogged by the earlier canard against him, as well as his resistance to civil service reform. In the election, he lost to Grover Cleveland (Jerry Brown), thanks to an intemperate remark that a clergyman made in his presence that the Democrats were the party of “Rum, Romanism and Rebellion,” which, nevertheless, stuck to him, and cost him the Catholic vote, thanks to an early policy stance surrounding the separation of Church’n’State. Cleveland barely beat him by less than 25,000 poplar votes, although they translated into an electoral college advantage of 219 to 182. The margin of victory was so slim, that a slight change in the NY count would have given him the election. Wrote a well-received two volume his/story, “Twenty Years of Congress,” afterwards, and then served as secretary of state in the next administration, that of Benjamin Harrison (Walter Mondale), whom he had supported instead of making another divisive run for the White House. Enjoyed the thrill of being an international player in the office, although proved larger ineffective in his larger goals. Interested in increasing American exports, and hemispheric stability, which he promoted in the first Pan-American Conference in 1889. Tried to annex Hawai’i, and negotiate a treaty with Nicaragua for an isthmus canal, while in office, although failed to grasp the scope of Latin American nationalism. As he got older his health continued to decline, and he suffered both melancholia and hypochondria. Resigned from his post in 1892 for health resigns and died several months later. Inner: Seen as both magnetic and brilliant, thanks to a facility with words, and great presence. Had more followers than intimates, preferring to keep his distance from people, despite a great ability to remember names and faces. Far better at suggesting programs than manifesting them, proving to be a man of eloquent words, rather than implemental actions. Imaginative, impatient and quick-witted, with a love of literature, and a facility for engaging conversation. More a party leader than a legislator, opening the gates for the Republican Party of 1896 and its subsequent 16 year domination of presidential politics. Close but no cigar lifetime of just missing attaining the presidency, while giving his usual high articulate voice to Republican Party politics and his own sense of direction for the nation at large. James Oglethorpe (1696-1785) - English general, colony founder and philanthropist. Outer: From the landed aristocracy. Both parents were staunch Jacobites, which gave their son an abiding loyalty to the crown, courage and high purpose. Two older brothers. Killed a man and spent 5 months in prison for the deed. Went to Eton, then Corpus Christi College, Oxford, but decided to join the army of Prince Eugene of Savoy (Arnold Schwarzenegger) in 1714. Became aide-de-camp to the prince at the suggestion of John Churchill (John F. Kennedy) and served with distinction against the Turks. Ended his Jacobite interests in 1719. Elected an MP in 1722, and at decade’s end, presided over a committee for prison reform, which inspired the idea that debtors and oppressed Protestants be recolonized in the southeast of the New World as a buffer against Spanish interest in Florida. Wound up with poor tradesman and religious refugees instead. Sailed for South Carolina in 1732, and settled in what eventually become Savannah, Georgia, setting up the first Masonic Lodge in the New World. Negotiated with the Creek Amerindians for land, and built defensive forts, before returning to England and gaining a royal charter for the province of Georgia, under the proviso it would be slave-free. Ran into much opposition because of his prohibition of both slavery and rum, and was looked upon in unkindly manner by his settlers, who saw him as a restrictive dictator. Ultimately forced to lift the ban on slavery. Also had difficulties with the Methodist Wesleys. When war broke out between England and Spain in 1739, he vigorously defended the territory at his own expense, in what was known as the War of Jenkins’ War. Although he was foiled in his attempt at capturing St. Augustine, Florida, he did lead some successful raids on Spanish forts, thanks to Amerindian help from the Seminoles. Returned to England in 1743, after being named brigadier general. Served in Lancashire against the Jacobites but was accused of misconduct. Although acquitted, he retired from military life afterwards. Married in 1744 to Elizabeth Wright, a wealthy Englishwoman. Initially a Jacobite Tory, he eventually became a more liberal Whig. A friend of Samuel Johnson (Winston Churchill) and his literary circle, involving himself in the intellectual life of the city, during his long stint as a Member of Parliament. Became a noted philanthropist and eventually retired and died at the advanced age of 89. Inner: Highly social, good conversationalist with an active mind. Conservative, and eventually a liberal ideologue, without the charisma to ground his policies into actualities. Imperial philanthropist and humanitarian. Bridge lifetime of exploring the possibilities of the New World as an ideologue and administrator, before retreating to the more familiar territory of the mind and stimulating conversation in his ongoing desire to integrate his advanced thinking with the far slower political worlds in which he continually finds himself.

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PATHWAY OF THE POLITICIAN AS CONTINUAL NEAR PRESIDENT:
Storyline: The eager reformer is always the bridesmaid but never the bride in the national electoral sweepstakes, despite a repeated propensity for coming within a hairbreadth of his longtime goal, thanks to a flawed character still not in tune with the larger nation’s needs.

Thomas E. Dewey (Thomas Edmund Dewey) (1902-1971) - American politician. Outer:Admiral George Dewey (John Kerry) was his grandfather’s 3rd cousin. Father edited the local newspaper in the town in which he was born, and was also postmaster and Republican county chairman. Entered this world above his grandfather’s store. Worked all through his youth, then went to the Univ. of Michigan, where he wrote for the student school newspaper, and also won several singing contests, evincing a pleasing baritone. 5'8". Won a scholarship to a music school, where he met his future wife, Frances Hutt. She would go on to appear in George White’s “Scandals” on Broadway. Grew his trademark mustache on a bicycle trip thru France in 1925. The duo married in 1928 and had 2 sons. An Episcopalian, and later a Mason, as well as a smoker. Sang in church choirs and synagogues to pay for law school and graduated Columbia Law School, doing the 2 year course in two. Went to work for two prominent NYC law firms, while actively becoming involved in Republican politics in its progressive, reform wing. Served as chief asst. to the U.S. attorney for the Southern District of NY from 1931 to 1933 and then the U.S. attorney briefly the following year. Went after arch-criminal Dutch Schultz, who threatened to assassinate him, only to be assassinated himself by the Mafia for fear of drawing too much heat on them. Subsequently appointed by Gov. Herbert Lehman in 1935 as a special prosecutor to investigate organized crime, and earned his reputation in that position, while also prosecuting Wall Street malfeasance. Worked with an excellent staff, that he had chosen, while showing great efficiency and tenacity, and won 72 convictions in 73 prosecutions of vice, racketeering and corruption in a variety of industries. Won handily for district attorney of Manhattan in 1937, as a racket buster. The following year he lost the race for governor to the popular Lehman, but emerged as a favored candidate for the Republican nomination for the presidency in 1940, only to lose it to Wendell Willkie (Barack Obama). In 1942, he finally achieved the governorship, which he used to launch a successful bid for the Republican nomination for the presidency, as a classic isolationist conservative, a stance he would later ameliorate. Campaigning on a moderately conservative agenda of lower taxes and less government, while still keeping elements of FDR’s New Deal in place, he was thoroughly defeated by the latter, garnering less than 1/4 of his electoral votes, thanks in large part to the formal, impersonal image he projected and his aggressive hunger for the job. Likened by wit Alice Roosevelt Longworth to the little man on the wedding-cake, a prophetic description, since he was always the bridesmaid, but never the bride to the national populace. Won the governorship for a second term in 1946, and in 1948, he campaigned for the presidency again against an unpopular incumbent, Harry S. Truman, who had inherited the office when FDR died before completing his term. Ran as more of an internationalist, much to the disdain of many conservatives, and despite being the clear favorite, he played it so safe and platitudinous, that he was trumped by Truman, who summarily ended his dream of becoming president, despite a premature newspaper headline in the Chicago Tribune which stated otherwise. Elected governor for a third time in 1950, he became a power broker in the Republican Party, gaining the nomination for Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1952, who went on to handily win the election. Also aided the career of Richard Nixon, helping him win the vice-presidential nomination. Further alienated his more right-wing compeers for outmaneuvering their man, Robert A. Taft in the process. During his 12 years as governor, he cut taxes, increased salaries for state workers, reduced the state’s debt, developed the State University system, and expanded the highway web, as well favored amplifying the State’s welfare and unemployment networks. A strong proponent of the death penalty, he oversaw the electrocution of over 90 people, including two women. When his term of office ended in 1955, he went into private practice again, with his own Wall Street firm, while continuing to strongly influence the Republican Party, despite his moderate compromised stances on elements of the New Deal, and an internationalist view that ran counter to the isolationism of the country’s mainline conservatives. When Eisenhower was mulling not running again in 1956 in favor of him, party hard-liners talked the former out of it. As the conservative wing gained more and more control of the party, he found himself persona non grata in their midsts, and less and less of a factor in party politics. Following the death of his wife, he began dating actress Kitty Carlisle, before dying of a heart attack. Inner: Hard worker, aggressive, tenacious and highly efficient. Outwardly calm, dignified and self-assured, but curiously impersonal, formal and aloof in his public projections. As one Democratic hostess put it, “You have to know Mr. Dewey very well in order to dislike him.” Repeat performance lifetime of doing pretty much what he had earlier done, while once again making all the right career moves, only to ultimately play it too safe to realize his singular longheld ambition, that of the U.S. presidency. Samuel J. Tilden (1814-1886) - American politician. Outer: Father was a storekeeper and postmaster who was a friend of Martin Van Buren (Franklin Roosevelt) and William Marcy (Antonio Villaraigosa). 5th child. His father sold nostrums and drugs, and had a morbid obsession with health as well as politics, which he passed onto to his son. Had a stultified childhood thanks to his sire’s temperament, and also lived for a while with an ungrounded aunt in NYC, which further alienated him. Studied briefly at Yale College, but was forced to leave after one term because of ill health. Never married, and at the end of his life confided to a friend that he was a virgin. Slightly built, with a boyish face, nervous and awkward gestures, and a weak voice, he would also be plagued by ill health most of his life. Published several political essays, then studied studied law at what what would become NYU, and was admitted to the NY bar in 1841. Became a prominent trial and corporate lawyer, while continuing his strong interest in politics. Specialized in refinancing railroads, and grew rich in the process, thanks to shrewd investments in NY real estate, Michigan iron mines and railroads. Joined the Democratic Party, and served in the state legislature in 1846. Although a member of the “Free Soil” faction of the Democratic Party, he did not become a Republican like his fellow “Barnburners,” whom he saw as sectional and divisive, in their desire to shut out the South from the national government. Instead, he followed his conservative instincts, thanks to his accumulated wealth, and remained a Democrat, which at the time, was the party of big business. In 1855, he was the anti-slavery candidate for attorney-general of the state, although he was more opposed to the institution for political and economic reasons, than humane ones. Antipathetic Abraham Lincoln’s election in 1860, knowing full well it would lead to Civil War, and took no active part in the subsequent conflict. Afterwards, he became chairman of the Democratic state committee, and although he initially worked in harmony with the corrupt Boss Tweed (Steve Wynn) ring, he ultimately broke with it, after it had been editorially exposed, and belatedly finished it off, which gave him the political backing to win the governorship of New York in 1874, thanks to his restructuring of the NY judiciary and expelling its corrupt judges, in another adroit political move. Proved to be a meticulous, hard-working administrator, and won national fame for his efforts, while adding to his luster by breaking up the “Canal” ring, another graft-inspired group which exploited the state’s canal systems. Won the Democratic nomination for the presidency in 1876 on the strength of his perceived incorruptibility, although his name was subsequently smeared in the campaign as being disloyal during the Civil War and filing both fraudulent and no tax returns in the 1860s. His uncommanding frail presence, plus his connection with the railroads and his general indifference did little to inspire those who came into direct contact him, making the ultimate election an extremely close affair. Although he received a majority of 250,000 votes, he lost the electoral college by one vote, 185 to 184 to Rutherford B. Hayes (Jimmy Carter), after much maneuvering and compromise, as well as a judgment by the electoral commission. Proved indecisive and timid in the aftermath, and ultimately accepted the judgment for the sake of national harmony, but insisted afterwards that he had legally been elected president. Following his defeat, he was harassed by investigation of his tax returns, as well as charges that he had been in negotiation for purchasing electoral votes in the contested states of South Carolina and Florida, although he vehemently denied the charges. The entire experience totally turned him off politics, and he refused to run again, even though the party wanted to nominate him in both 1880 and 1884. Instead he retired to his Yonkers estate, and devoted himself to accumulating a large library, while living as a recluse thanks to his various infirmities. Eventually amassed a huge estate of over $5 million, and wanted to establish a great public library in NYC with it, although his relatives contested the will, in a symbolic repeat of his life, where his larger will wound up contested as well. His library, however, along with two others, wound up as the basis for the NY Public Library, which bears his name on its front. On his gravestone, would sit the words, “I Still Trust in the People.” Inner: Bookish, cerebral, secretive, aloof and highly ambitious. Despite his seeming noble stances, largely motivated by ambition, which weakened what should have been an outstanding career as reformer and magisterial politician. Thwarted lifetime of excess timidity, despite a genuine gift for reform and administration, necessitating a rough repeat of the same story with a somewhat more dynamic character, who would still be plagued by the same disconnected and cautious interior. Thomas Dudley (1576-1653) - English/American governor and magistrate. Outer: Father was an English country gentleman, and may have been part of the noble Dudley family, although the connection has never been proven. Only son, with one sister. His mother died when he was young, and he was orphaned at 14, when his sire, a captain, was killed in battle. Entered the service of several wealthy patrons, who sent him to Latin school, and he became a page in the house of the Earl of Northampton, where he learned the manners of the nobility. Became a judge’s clerk, as well as a Puritan in his early 20s. Married Dorothy Yorke, a gentlewoman in 1603, and among his 5 children was poetess Anne Bradstreet (Zadie Smith). Served as a steward of the Earl of Lincoln’s estates, helping him with his financial difficulties. As tensions continued to grow between the Puritans and the English government, he was chosen in 1629 as one of 5 officers to emigrate to the Americas under the Royal Charter. Sailing on the flagship of the Winthrop Fleet, he arrived in the Massachusetts Bay Colony the following year, where he became deputy governor, while John Winthrop (William Bennett), was the governor. Became the second most influential man in the colony next to him, and often quarreled with him, beginning immediately on their landing, when they could not agree on where the seat of government should be located, with Winthrop prevailing in his desire for Boston. Settled in New Towne, which would later be Cambridge. Alternately served as governor of the colony 4 times and deputy governor 13 times, and also helped found Harvard College, signing its charter. Proved to be far more intolerant than the relatively liberal Winthrop, showing himself to be a Puritan of the sternest mold. He was also a harsh heresy hunter, helping to give the Mass. Bay Colony much of its early uptight character. His wife died in 1643, and he married Katherine Deighton the following year. Among his 7 children with his second wife was future governor Joseph Dudley (Jerry Brown/Joseph Biden). Inner: Stern, dogmatic, austere, unbending, but also highly competent, and as always a vigorous reformer. Scholarly, wrote forgettable poetry. Grim-lipped lifetime of introducing himself to the new world as a paradigm of righteous behavior, setting up a model which would both propel and repel the succeeding electorate to alternately accept and reject him and ultimately frustrate him from his longheld higher goals.

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PATHWAY OF THE POLITICIAN AS CONSERVATIVE ICON:
Storyline: The stalwart patriot would rather be right than president, and continually proves himself a consistent man of principle, even when his beliefs go against the lockstep tenets of the movement he came to personify.

Barry Goldwater (1909-1998) - American politician. Outer: Grandfather, Mike Goldwasser, was a Jewish immigrant from Poland, who opened an eponymous department store. His father converted to the Episcopal Church on marrying, and continued running the store, which made the family very well off. Oldest child. A good athlete, although never much of a student. Had a lifelong fascination with gadgetry, as well as Amerinidian culture. 6’, blue-eyed, and bespectacled, with a strong chin. Went to a military academy, and then spent a year at the Univ. of Arizona, before taking over Goldwater’s in 1930 at his sire’s death. Married Margaret Johnson in 1934, 2 sons and 2 daughters from union, including Barry, Jr. who would go on to serve in the House of Representatives. Became company president in 1937, the same year he suffered the first of 2 nervous collapses from the pressures of the store. Got a reserve commission at the outbreak of WW II and spent the war flying between the U.S. and India delivering supplies. Stayed in the reserves after the conflict, ultimately retiring as a major general. Organized the Arizona air national guard in 1946, and led the fight to desegregate the Air Force, while supporting the initial Civil Rights acts, although drew the line in 1964, which he felt it went too far in empowering the government. In 1949, he entered politics campaigning against union shops, and was elected as a Republican to the Phoenix city council. 4 years later, he was elected U.S. Senator from Arizona as an isolationist and classic conservative who opposed the intrusion of the federal government into the lives of ordinary citizens, objected to the United Nations, and supported a strong military, while championing the traditional values of an earlier America. Later opposed the censure of Joseph McCarthy, whom he unwaveringly supported as a fellow anti-communist. By the decade’s nearend, he had emerged as leader of the conservative wing of the Republican party. Handily won re-election in 1958, despite strong labor opposition to him, and in 1960, published “The Conscience of a Conservative,” limning his anti-communist views. The work would prove seminal for the movement he represented, and he spent the next 4 years, gearing himself for the Republican nomination for the presidency. Resigned his senate seat, and despite liberal Republican opposition, won the nomination in 1964 in a bitter fight, only to lose by the largest margin ever to Pres. Lyndon B. Johnson, who portrayed him as a nuclear nut, capable to bringing the world to annihilation, thanks to his avowed sentiment, “Extremism in the name of liberty is no vice! Moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue.” Won only six states and less than 40% of the vote, but helped turn the solid South into an ultimate Republican bastion, when it had been a Democratic stronghold ever since the Civil War. Returned to the Senate in 1968, and held his seat until his final retirement in 1987. Persuaded Richard Nixon to resign in 1974, when he told him he would be impeached over Watergate if he didn’t. Later called him the most dishonest person he had ever met. Paved the way for Ronald Reagan’s championing of the conservative cause and ascent to the presidency in 1980, and served as chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee in the early 1980s. Proved himself a maverick, however, with some of his stances, including feeling a woman had the ultimate choice in whether to have an abortion or not, and that gays could serve in the military, thanks to his strongly held beliefs in personal liberty. Seen as an apostate by some, but was always consistent in his belief that the government had no right to interfere in the private lives of its citizens over any issue. Ultimately worried that the Christian right was more of a threat than liberals or moderates in their imposition of their own moral and religious values. Seven years after the death of his wife in 1985, he married Susan Wechsler, a nurse, who was over three decades his junior. Suffered a stroke in 1996, and disappeared from public view, as he slipped into Alzheimer’s disease. Ultimately died from complications from the stroke. Inner: More the ideologue than the actualizer of his principles, particularly after seeing them distorted later in life. Great believer in freedom and rugged individualism, and in the military strength of the country as the best counterfoil to the threat of communism. Accomplished amateur photographer, and ham radio operator, with a tendency to say what he felt, no matter how impolitic. Also harbored a fascination with UFOs. Libertarian lifetime of giving voice to traditional American values and spearheading the modern conservative movement, only to see it become as intrusive as the liberal model he loathed, as he continues to champion his clear-cut vision and division of right, left and wrong in his ongoing identification with varying facets of the American experience. Howell Cobb (1815-1868) - American politician. Outer: From a wealthy and socially prominent Georgia family that dominated the political life of the South during the antebellum period, with a long tradition of public service. Father was a cotton planter. Older brother of writer Thomas Cobb (William Safire). Grew up in cultured environs, and went to the Univ. of Georgia, although he was expelled for participating in a riot, before being readmitted. Upon graduating in 1834, he immediately married Mary Ann Lamar, and was admitted to the bar in 1836, after two years of private study. His wife was the daughter of another wealthy Georgia planter, allowing him the leisure to devote his life to public affairs, without having to worry about an income. 6 children from the union, as well his wife’s sizable estate, which included several cotton plantations and 200 slaves. Became a state solicitor general, and then was elected as a conservative Democrat for 4 terms to the House of Representatives, ultimately rising to Speaker, where for a few days he was a heartbeat from the presidency in 1850 on the death of Zachary Taylor (Gerald Ford). Supported both territorial expansion and the extension of slavery into the new territories, but also backed the Compromise of 1850, and through it, handily won the governorship of Georgia as a Democratic unionist, holding that office from 1851 to 1853, where he supported educational reform and health care, although came into conflict with the state’s conservative Democrats. Failed to get a coveted senate nomination and briefly retired to his law practice. Wrote about slavery in Biblical terms in 1856, a stance many southern slave owners took during that period to rationalize their position. After being elected to the House of Representatives again, he became Secretary of the Treasury under James Buchanan (Patrick Buchanan), a close friend of his, and served in that post for 3 years, before resigning at the end of 1860. Became a confirmed secessionist at that point, after a lifetime of resisting that idea, and a leader of the secession movement. Served as president of the seceded states, when they gathered in Alabama just prior to the Civil War in 1861, and spearheaded a constitution for the newly forming Confederacy. Went on to serve as Speaker and President Pro Temporare of the early Confederate Provision Congress, then enlisted in the Confederate army at the outbreak of the war. Made a colonel, and the following year was appointed brigadier general, commanding a brigade of the Army of Northern Virginia. Fought in several notable battles, including Antietam, and then was dispatched to Florida. Made a major general in 1863, he was put in command of the District of Georgia and Florida, where the notorious Andersonville prison was constructed per his suggestion. Fought throughout the war, and at its nearend opposed Gen. Robert E. Lee’s (George Marshall) desire to enlist slaves in the conflict, arguing it would counter the South’s rationalization that they were completely inferior people, and did not deserve the right to be viewed as the equals of the soldiers who were fighting to maintain them as such. After the war, he went home and continued his law practice, partnering with a relative, while opposing Reconstruction, and bitterly denouncing it in a series of speeches. While taking a vacation in NYC, he suffered a massive heart attack and died instantly in a hotel lobby. Inner: Conservative and charismatic traditionalist and very much a product of both his time and place. Ideologue lifetime of strong identification with a highly divisive cause only to literally wind up broken-hearted from its unwanted outcome. George Onslow (1731-1792) English soldier and politician. Outer: From a family of politicians and military men. Eldest son of Sir Richard Onslow and his second wife. Nephew of Arthur Onslow, Speaker of the House of Commons. Father was a major-general and an MP from Guildford. Oldest of four, with two younger brothers, one of whom was an admiral, the other a vicar and a younger sister. Short and rotund. Joined the British army as an ensign in the Foot Guards in 1748. Four years later, he married Jane Thorpe. 5 sons from the union. Rose steadily in rank, ultimately becoming a lieutenant-colonel in 1769. The next year, he resigned from the army and entered the House of Commons as a Whig MP from Guildford, following the death of his father, and continued to sit for his borough until his retirement nearly a quarter century later. Supported the relatively liberal Rockingham (Nelson Rockefeller) administration, which felt a war against the American colonists was unwinnable and was made an Out-Ranger of Windsor Forest, a post held by several of his ancestors, for life. Voted for the repeal of the Stamp Act, a tax on the colonies to support British troops there, then turned decidedly conservative, supporting successive ministries trying to maintain British control over the increasingly upstart American colonists. The monopolist Tea Act of 1773, was a negative watershed in British/Colonial American relations, and he supported it. In addition, he blocked attempts of printers to report debates in Commons, and his desire for censorship had him hanged in effigy on Tower Hill. Even after the British were obviously losing to the colonists, he opposed any and all efforts at making peace stating it was better to lose America by arms than by treaty, while also standing against economic reform. Retired from Parliament in 1784, after seeing most of his efforts go for naught. Suffered a carriage accident eight years later, in his home district and died of it. Inner: Steadily more conservative and recalcitrant as he grew older, a military man to the core who could not abide defeat. Enjoyed cockfighting, as an emblem of his competitiveness, while his oratory was subject in some circles to mockery. Militaristic lifetime of refusing to accept American independence via the battlefield, before returning to embrace the former colonies as a staunch supporter of its more conservative elements.

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PATHWAY OF THE POLITICIAN AS GOOD CHRISTIAN KNIGHT:
Storyline: The martial peacenik sees himself in a heroic mold as a political savior, as he strides out twice to try to save a divided country with his moral vision and soldierly skills, only to be repeatedly rejected for his inability to integrate his vision with the realities in which he finds himself.

George McGovern (1922-2012) - American politician. Outer: Father was a Methodist minister, who had been a professional baseball player, and both parents were Republicans. Mother was homemaker and twenty years her disciplinarian husband’s junior. One of 4 children, whom hs father refused to allow to go to the movies or play sports. When he was 6, his family moved to South Dakota. 6’1”, 175 lbs. Graduated from Dakota Wesleyan Univ. Met his future wife, Eleanor Stegeberg in a high school debate, in which she and her partner defeated him and his cohort. Married her in 1943, and they remained so until her death in 2007. 4 daughters and a son from the union. Took flying lessons, despite fears around it, and got a pilot’s license in order to test his warrior heart, then volunteered for the US Army Air Force during WW II. Served as a bomber pilot, flying 35 missions over rat-a-tat-tat-tat territory, and won a Distinguished Service Cross for safely crash landing, and saving his crew in the process. After the war, he got a divinity degree from Garret Theological Seminary in Chicago, and became a Methodist minister, only to feel he was becoming his father. Got a Phd in his/story from Northwestern Univ. and went back to his alma mater to teach. Joined the Progressive Party in 1948, and was an enthusiastic supporter of Henry Wallace in his subsequent quixotic try for the presidency. Was won over to the Democrats four years later through the eloquence of Adlai Stevenson. In 1956, he won a seat in the House of Representatives, in his first elective run. Served two terms then failed in his first bid for senator from South Dakota. Pres. John F. Kennedy made him the first director of his Food for Peace program, and the higher public profile gained him the state’s other senate seat in 1962, which he held onto for 3 terms. Initially voted for the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution which precipitated the Vietnam war, then became an early and bitter opponent of it. Presented himself as a liberal and moral voice of reason against the tremendous toll of the war, and scolded his fellow senators for their callousness in allowing it to continue. Made a bid for the Democratic nomination for the presidency in 1968, after the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy, in a gesture of picking up his fallen peace banner, but had been highly critical of the former beforehand, and did not capture the imagination of the antiwar crowd. Wound up defeated by the garrulous vice-president Hubert Humphrey, and the more conservative and traditional elements of the party. The following year he was named chairman of the party’s Reform Commission, which gave caucuses and primaries primacy over selecting candidates, rather than insiders as before, and also opened up the convention to minorities, women and youth, which set the stage for his own triumphant 1972 convention, when he won the nomination, thanks to his campaign manager, Gary Hart, a future contender himself. Much to the delight of the Republicans, he ran as representative of the ultraliberal wing of the Democratic Party, demanding troop withdrawal, cuts in defense spending, and support of the Equal Rights Amendment. Two weeks into his campaign, his vice-presidential candidate Thomas Eagleton was tagged for undergoing electroshock therapy, and he was forced to drop him and replace him with a Kennedy in-law, Sargent Shriver, after first declaring his 1000% backing of his depressive running mate. The more traditional elements of the party refused to support him, and he wound up getting creamed in the election, by an electorate who had had enough of lefties. Failed even taking his own home state, as only Massachusetts and the District of Columbia fell into his electoral column, and he got trounced 520 to 17, although the Watergate break-in occurred during the election, which would ultimately spell loss for the victor, Richard Nixon, as well. Reelected to the Senate in 1974, where he made little legislative difference and ultimately switched his dovish position by voting for military action following the Iranian hostage crisis in 1979. Much later he admitted voting for Gerald Ford over his own party’s Jimmy Carter, feeling more comfortable with the former. Lost his reelection bid the following year, as the country swung noticeably rightward. Became a professor at the Univ. of New Orleans for two years. and then in 1984, he made another bid for the presidential nomination, although inspired little enthusiasm and quit early on. In 1994, one of his daughters died of alcohol related causes, freezing to death in a parking lot snow bank at 45, after years of battling addiction. Devastated at the loss, he founded a nonprofit organization in response to the problem in her name. Remained active politically past the turn of the century, with U.N. posts, and continued to act as a liberal voice throughout the Bush administration, seeing definite parallels between the Vietnam and Iraq Wars. In 2006, he co-authored a book calling for withdrawal from Iraq, while continuing hs prolific output of tomes. Skydived to celebrate his 88th birthday, before health problems slowed him down. Lost his only son, Stephen, to alcoholism, just before hs own peaceful demise. Died in a hospice, surrounded by family and friends. Inner: Highly moral, and unbendingly righteous, as a secular minister with a strong Christian identification with the Prince of Peace. Believed in government as a protector of the vulnerable, and a creator of economic opportunity. Unabashedly liberal, and highly principled, as a rare political figure who did not benefit financially from his office, and instead, supported himself afterwards writing and teaching Moral scold lifetime of inadvertently doing untold damage to the Democratic Party through his leftward lurch towards peace, while remaining true to his beliefs, no matter the personal or political costs. George McClellan (1826-1885) - American general and politician. Outer: Of Scottish descent. Father was a prominent surgical ophthalmologist, and a medical college founder, mother was the product of a leading Pennsylvania family. The middle of five children, his younger brother became his aide-de-camp. Went to prep schools and the Univ. of Pennsylvania at the age of 13 to reluctantly study law, but after two years, opted for military service. 5'6", red-haired, squarely and powerfully built, with surpassing strength and endurance. Accepted at West Point in 1842, when it waived the minimal age requirement for him, thanks to his family’s pull. Graduated 2nd in his class of 59 in 1846, and was commissioned a 2nd lieutenant in the engineers. Fought in the Mexican War, and then served as an instructor in engineering at West Point, before helping explore the sources of the Red River. Thanks to his fluency in French, he was sent to Europe to study tactics and organization. Witnessed the seige of Sebastopol in the Crimean War, and submitted a new design for cavalry saddles that was utilized for many years. Resigned from the army in 1857, and became chief engineer of the Illinois Central Railroad and then president of another railroad company. Married Ellen Marcy, the daughter of one of his former commanders in 1860, after she had turned down his proposal 5 years earlier. Son of the same name became a politician, while his daughter spent most of her life abroad. Joined the Union army at the outbreak of the Civil War, and was commissioned a major general of Ohio volunteers, before gaining the same rank with the regulars. Early successes led to his becoming commanding general of the Union Army in November of 1861. Organized and trained the Army of the Potomac and made it a creditable fighting force, while operating from the credo that the less damage and casualties, the better the changes for a conciliation following the war. Well-liked by his troops, he was known as ‘Little Mac,’ thanks to a genuine caring for their well-being. Relieved of his larger command in 1862, by Pres. Abraham Lincoln, because of his caution and slowness in advancing. Retained his command of the Army of the Potomac, and continued his successes, although proved no match for Robert E. Lee (George Marshall), who was able to take advantage of his hesitancies, although the latter considered him the best commander he faced. Used his organizational skills to prepare the defense of Washington, then defeated the Confederates at two key battles, but failed to follow up on his victories, and wound up being relieved of his command in late 1862, to await orders. Although he wished to vigorously prosecute the war, he accepted the peace platform of the Democratic Party, but had difficulty in reconciling his views with it. Ran against Lincoln as the Democratic candidate in 1864, but was badly beaten, by a ten to one margin in electoral votes, thanks to his own bitterness over imagined injustices to him in his curtailed commands. Resigned his commission afterwards and went to Europe for 3 years. When he returned to the U.S. he served as chief engineer for NYC’s Department of Docks in the early 1870s, then served with a railroad company as trustee and president at the same time. Finished his public career as governor of New Jersey from 1877 to 1881. Spent his last years traveling and writing. His autobiography, “McClellan’s Own Story” appeared two years after his death from heart problems. A defense of his battlefield actions, it was only partially completed, so that his editor used wartime letters to his wife as filler, further sullying his ultimate reputation. His last words were, “I feel easy now. Thank you,” before dying of heart trouble. Inner: Meticulous organizer and administrator and an excellent strategist, although he was too slow and cautious for the battlefield movements of the war, proving to be far more effective off the field than on it, leading to a low opinion of him by the harsh eye of his/story, despite his obvious capabilities. Quiet and scholarly, enjoyed mountain-climbing in Switzerland as a release. Good visionary, but also egotistical and self-defeating in his ultimate desire to be a conciliatory force in a time of civil war. Poorly perceived lifetime of ending up as a his/storical butt instead of a hero, thanks to a combination of circumstances, caution and conciliation, in his ongoing odd capacity for achieving the opposite of many of his aims. Frederick Muhlenberg (Frederick Augustus Conrad Muhlenberg) (1750-1801) - American minister and politician. Outer: Son of German immigrants, and eldest of 11 children. His brother Peter (Mike Pence) also became a minister and politician. Father was a prominent Lutheran minister. At the age of 13, he was sent, along with two brothers, to the Univ. of Halle, Germany, where he studied theology and was ordained by the Lutheran Church in 1770. In 1771, he wed Catherine Schaeffer, the daughter of a wealthy Philadelphia sugar refiner. Seven children from the union. Preached in rural Pennsylvania and then served a German-speaking church in NYC from 1774-1776. When the British entered NYC at the outset of the American revolution, he returned to his native town, and then was a pastor in Pennsylvania until 1779, when he quit the ministry to engage full-time in politics, and pursue business interests to support his family.. He was elected to the Continental Congress. and then became a member of the Pa. state house of reps, serving as its speaker from 1780 to 1783, thanks to the support of the German community in the Philadelphia area. In 1787, he became a delegate to and president of the Pa. state constitutional convention where he ratified the Federal Constitution. During this period he also held local offices in Montgomery County. Also became more moderate in his views, encouraging the revision of both Pennsylvania’s unicameral constitution and the national Articles of Confederate. Elected as a Pro-Administration candidate to the First Congress, then was reelected as an Anti-Administration candidate to the Second and Third Congresses, and finally as a Republican to the Fourth Congress, serving from 1789 to 1797. Became the first Speaker of Assembly to the First and Third Congresses, serving for two terms but was not a candidate for renomination in 1796. Served as president of the council of censors in Pa., while also being made a trustee of the Univ. of the State of Pennsylvania. Following his death, the town of Muhlenberg, Pa. was named for him. Inner: Staunch supporter of the American Revolution, then served as an effective bridge between the Federalists and the Democratic/Republicans, while integrating more Germans into the American political process. Transitional lifetime of trading in his clerical collar for a run of political offices, while gradually tempering his views to a more moderate sense of the burgeoning United States of America.

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PATHWAY OF THE POLITICIAN AS PRESENT DAY PURITAN:
Storyline: The stoical pol publicly plays Zorba the Geek in his ongoing lessons, both personal and national, around competition, rejection and loss, while serving, as part of that process, as the last standard-bearer of liberalism in the presidential sweepstakes of the 20th century.

Michael Dukakis (1933) - American politician. Outer: Parents were Greek immigrants. Cousin of actress Olympia Dukakis. Father became an obstretician. Had one self-destructive older brother, Stelian. An Eagle Scout and straight arrow in high school, he graduated from Swarthmore Univ., then served in the military before getting his law degree from Harvard Law School in 1960. 5’6”. In 1964, he married Katherine Dickson, known as Kitty, 3 children from union. His wife would subsequently prove to be a depressive and some questions would linger whether he had had psychiatric treatment sometime in his earlier life. His brother had had a breakdown in his early 20s, and made a suicide attempt, before being institutionalized and given electro-shock therapy. The latter subsequently campaigned against his sibling, and the duo had a contentious, competitive adulthood. After an argument between the pair, Stelian pedaled off into the night and had a fatal bicycle accident in 1973, leaving an empty scar in his brother’s psyche. Elected to the Mass. state legislature as a Democrat, then became Mass. governor in 1974, and went on to hold that position for 3 terms to become the longest serving chief executive in the state’s his/story. Broke a no taxes pledge on taking office, as well as a promise to break up the politically powerful and patronage-rich Metropolitan District Commission. Proved to be large-hearted when it came to criminals, posthumously exonerating Nicola Sacco (Terry Nichols) and Bartolomeo Vanzetti (Tim McVeigh), 50 years after their execution, and also commuting numerous murder sentences, a practice which rebounded, so that he stopped doing it his last 3 years in office. Lost in the primaries of the 1978 election because state party leaders thought he was ineffective, and he had to bitterly swallow the humiliation, but bounced back and defeated his rival in 1982, with John Kerry as his lieutenant-governor. Won handily in 1986, thanks to a high tech boom, and his own technocratic reputation as being part of the economic Massachusetts Miracle which followed. Gained the plaudits of his fellow governors as well for the feat. Rode the subway to the capitol every day, while also vastly improving Boston’s transit system. Despite a crimped personality, he emerged from a varied field known as the Seven Dwarfs in 1988, to win the Democratic nomination as a card-carrying liberal. Code-named Peso by the Secret Service, because he was cheap. In the subsequent election In the subsequent election, he was outmaneuvered by George H. W. Bush and his dirty tricks department, which trumpeted the sad story of furloughed felon Willie Horton, who committed a rape and assault while on leave, as example of the governor’s unacceptable permissiveness. Despite having served in the military, he didn’t help his own cause by displaying his short unmartial form in an ill-fitting helmet inside a tank either. His response to a capital punishment question during the debates, when asked what he would do to the perp if his wife were raped and murdered, brought out an anti-death sentence response, which left the voters feeling he was passionless, and his numbers dropped substantially and never recovered, after earlier being heavily favored to defeat Bush. Lost by over a 3 to 1 margin in the electoral college, and was subsequently blamed for the Democratic Party’s listless tilt leftward and loss of the country’s imagination in the process. Following his defeat, the Massachusetts Miracle stuttered to a halt, and the state stumbled through his final two years, winding up with a $1.5 billion debt, the largest ever up to that time, despite his raising taxes once again. Retired from political life at the end of his term in 1990, and became a visiting professor at various institutions, while remaining a sour note by continually complaining in interviews about the underhandedness of the campaign that defeated him all through Bush’s term. In 1990, his wife published a book in which she admitted to successful electro-shock therapy for depression, while also suffering from alcoholism. Ultimately became bi-coastal, teaching at UCLA in the winter, while spending the rest of the year with his boyhood home as his base. Also returned to politics in an advisory capacity, with an enthusiasm about grassroots politicking as a coda to his own political life. Inner: Reserved and stoical, with a liberal, albeit puritanical sensibility. Contained lifetime of giving liberalism its last hurrah of the 20th century, while serially dealing with the humiliation and hurt of loss in more and more public manner, in an ongoing exercise in self-control and transmutation of personal pain, that has permeated all his public lives in America in this series. Roscoe Conkling (1829-1888) - American politician. Outer: Father was a U.S. representative and federal judge, as well as an author. Mother was of Scottish descent, and a noted beauty. Older brother, Frederick Augustus Conkling, was also a U.S. Representative. Attended Mt. Washington Collegiate Institute, then studied law in Utica, before being admitted to the bar in 1850, the same year he was made district attorney for Oneida County. In 1855, he married Julia Seymour, the sister of Horatio Seymour (Averill Harriman), a future governor of NY. One daughter from the union. An effective and popular orator, he made a name for himself at Whig conventions, before being elected mayor of Utica, and then Congress as a member of the newly formed Republican Party. Served in every Congress but one through the Civil War, before being elected a Senator in 1867, as a machine politician. A strong supporter of radical reconstruction, he became a national leader as part of the Stalwart (or Pro U.S. Grant) faction of the Republican Party. Re-elected twice more in 1873 and 1879. Showed himself to be a Senate boss, and a powerhouse thanks to his control of federal patronage in NY state, allowing him influence well beyond his office. Failed to gain the Republican nomination in 1876, when he lost to ultimate winner and dark horse Rutherford B. Hayes (Jimmy Carter), then questioned the legitimacy of his presidency in the close race that followed where the latter lost the popular vote to Samuel J. Tilden (Thomas E. Dewey), but won the disputed electoral vote. When the operations of the U.S. customs house, whose patronage system had traditionally been controlled by the Republicans, was investigated by the administration, he went out of his way to discredit Hayes & company, which was further darkened in his eye, by the employment of his longtime enemy, William Evarts as Secretary of State. Through his ministrations, Hayes failed to be renominated. Compromised with James Garfield (Coretta Scott King) in 1880, only to see his ‘Half-breed’ enemies dominate the latter’s cabinet, and his own power come to a grinding halt. Resigned along with Thomas Platt (George H.W. Bush), and offered himself to the NY legislature for vindication, only to fail to be re-elected. Following Garfield’s assassination, and his protege Chester A. Arthur (Hugh Carey) becoming president, he thought he’d regain his patronage post, only to run into the latter’s call for reform, which ended the relationship twixt the two, as well as his political career. Spent the rest of his working life practicing law in NYC, where his most outstanding accomplishment was to augment the 14th Amendment, which he had initially proposed, before the U.S. Supreme Court, making due process applicable to corporations, as well as individuals. Also managed to make a large fortune his post-political career. Fittingly, he died during a blizzard in NYC, while overextending himself. Inner: Vain, contentious, highly articulate, and superior in his sense of rightness and moral rectitude, with the reputation of having a “turkey-gobbler strut.” Temperate, despised tobacco, and was into exercise and boxing, taking great pride in his physique. Completely contemptuous of anyone who disagreed with him. Comeuppance lifetime of having his way for a period, and then being forced to suffer rejection and defeat, through a personality not equipped to deal with either, an ongoing theme of his, in his various incarnations in the public weal. Timothy Pickering (1745-1829) - American politician. Outer: From a middle-class background. 8th of 9 children, with only one other brother. Grew up strong-bodied. His family had the wherewithal for the education of its sons. Graduated from Harvard Univ. in 1763, and was admitted to the bar 5 years later in Salem, where he became active in local affairs and a leader of the local militia. Married Rebecca White in 1776, two sons from the union. Initially opposed to the patriot cause in the Revolutionary War, but in 1777 he accepted George Washington’s (George Marshall) offer to become adjutant general and then quartermaster general of the American army, proving highly efficient in both posts, although he was critical of the lukewarm support that the Revolution received in some popular quarters. Supported a large farm and family, although was less successful in his financial speculations, particular with Pennsylvania land. After the war, he supported a strong central government as a member of the Constitutional Convention. In 1791, he was made Postmaster General in Washington’s cabinet, and remained a cabinet officer for the rest of the decade. Able to set up an effective mail system, and also served as a Federal commissioner in several indigene disputes. In 1795, he was made Secretary of War, then State. As a Federalist, who also intrigued against fellow Fed Alexander Hamilton (John F. Kennedy), he was able to hold that position in the subsequent John Adams (Martin Sheen), administration, but was dismissed by the latter for his extremely anti-French and pro-British sentiments. Moved back to Massachusetts in 1800, and became a justice, before being elected to the U.S. Senate as a Federalist in 1803, where he became an opponent and critic of both Presidents Thomas Jefferson (Saul Williams) and James Madison (Woodrow Wilson). Grew more and more obdurate as he grew older, evincing a grumpy contentiousness that ultimately led to his openly advocating the secession of New England following the Louisiana Purchase, and the formation of a separate northern federation. After being defeated for re-election in 1811, he was elected to the House of Reps, serving from 1813 to 1817, during which time he opposed the War of 1812, while acting more and more of the public scold against Republican policies, so that he was ultimately seen in the light of his negatives, rather than his positives. Retired afterwards, and became a farmer, and was physically active until life’s end. Inner: Efficient, well-respected and liked, although when he did not get his way, he was intolerant, self-righteous and uncompromising. Affectionate family man, but as he grew older, his public personality became more and more cramped. There at the beginning lifetime of adding his efficient two cents to the incipient American mix, before evincing a far more crabbed nature when things didn’t turn out the way he wanted them. John Endecott (1588-1665) - English/American colonial governor. Outer: Grandfather held considerable tin-mining interests, while his mother was well-landed as well. His father predeceased his grandfather, although the latter disinherited him for his religious beliefs, after he came under the influence of two influential Puritan divines. His early life afterwards is largely obscured, although he probably saw service against Spain in the low countries. Married Ann Gower, a cousin of a colonial governor. In 1628, he was made one of the 6 grantees of the New England Company for a Plantation in Massachusetts, and was chosen manager and governor of the colonial settlement. Crossed the ocean with about 60 fellow settlers and integrated with an established Plymouth settlement already there. The two groups redubbed their settlement Salem. Shortly after arriving, his first wife died, and he married again, two children from the union, although to his disappointment, neither entered public life. Served as local governor of the Mass. Bay Colony, before being succeeded by John Winthrop (William Bennett), who arrived two years after him. Despite their religious differences, in which the latter was relatively liberal, while he was completely unbending in his beliefs, he was able to work with him, and wound up serving in one official capacity or the other for the colony for the rest of his life, including governor four more times following Winthrop’s death, and deputy governor thrice more. Despite his long service to the colony, he wound up dying in poverty. Inner: Capable and honest, but largely bigoted and intolerant of any religious view not his own. A contemporary called him, “a strange mixture of rashness, pious zeal, general manners and harsh bigotry.” Pilgrim’s progress lifetime of giving base to his strong identification with the New England area, as a crypto-Puritan trying to serially integrate a cramped private character with a political public that much prefers its leaders cheery and optimistic, no matter the realities they produce or have to deal with.

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PATHWAY OF THE POLITICIAN AS LONE STAR LIBERTARIAN:
Storyline: The noninterventionist individualist fiercely champions solitary citizens against the unfeeling collective state, seeing intrusive government as the severest threat possible to the American ideal of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

Ron Paul (Ronald Ernest Paul) (1935) - American physician, politician and writer. Outer: Of German descent on his paternal side and German/Irish on his maternal. Grew up on a dairy farm that his German immigrant grandfather had started, and his parents continued, with his mother serving as book keeper. Father was also a Freemason, leading to numerous rumors later on that his son was one, as well. Third of five brothers, who all shared the same bedroom. In high school he was on the wrestling team and was president of the student council, as well as the 220 yard dash state champion. Graduated from Gettysburg College, with a B.S. degree in biology in 1957, at which point he married Carol Wells, whom he had known since high school. Earned his medical degree from Duke Univ. in 1961, then interned in Detroit, while his wife taught dance classes to help support them. Three sons and two daughters from the union, including Rand Paul, an opthamologist who was elected to the Senate from Kentucky in 2010, as the only one of his children who does not live in Texas. Served as an Air Force flight surgeon afterwards, then was a member of the Air National Guard, before settling in Texas as an obstetrician and gynecologist, delivering over 4000 babies. Raised as a Lutheran, but had his children baptized in the Episcopal Church, before becoming a Baptist himself. Opened his own practice, where he lowered fees, and refused to take Medicaid or Medicare, then decided to enter politics in 1971, after Pres. Richard Nixon took America off the gold standard. Lost his first bid for the US Congress as a Republican in 1974, then won a special election to that same seat two years later, only to lose it in the general election. Finally won in 1978, and was reelected twice more, before losing a bid for the U.S. Senate and returning to his medical practice full time for the next decade, while also co-owning a coin dealership. Ran for president in 1988 in order to spread his Libertarian gospel of minimalist governmental spending, then won a congressional seat in 1996, and was continually reelected, ultimately garnering his 12th term in Congress in 2010 with 80% of the vote, thanks to being extremely active in his huge district on a personal level with his constituents. Made both foreign affairs and financial services his specialties, and has continued to be an aggressive critic of White House policy in both, no matter which party was occupying the Oval Office. Made another presidency run in 2008, although received less than his share of media coverage, despite building a large, and extremely enthusiastic fan base if Paulhards, which elicited another run in 2011. His contrarian stances include abolishing the Federal Reserve and income tax, refusing to support Israel and ending all foreign military entanglements, as well as all foreign aid. While he has elicited interest from a wide range of the political spectrum, his candidacy has been deliberately downplayed by the media, since his platforms run counter to those who own those same outlets, and they much prefer presenting him as an out-of-touch crank, when their minions deign to mention him at all. Despite earlier newsletters revealing strongly racist sentiments, and a great desire by the elites that he disappear, he vowed to remain in the race to the end with delegates under his control in order to affect the convention, while also serving as a stalkinghorse for his son, in the 2016 race, by establishing a solid base for his projected run. Finally suspended his campaign in May, when he ran out of money, although promised to use his delegates to affect the party platform. Afterwards, he pushed for a Federal Reserve audit in hopes of ultimately abolishing an institution whose tentacles into Congress are far too deep to make the gesture anything but symbolic, although it passed the House overwhelmingly. Refused to endorse Mitt Romney in the last political speech of hs career, delivered on the ever of the Republican convention, as he vowed the revolution he had begun is far from over. Has written several books and numerous articles and newsletters outlining his views in association with his Foundation for Rational Economics and Education, and has had the most consistently conservative voting record of anyone in Congress since New Deal times. Inner: Stubborn, consistent and principled with a great belief in self-reliance, and none whatsoever in the nanny state. Feels war has been the bane of America, causing the government to raise taxes and create a monolithic central state intimately involved in the lives of its citizens. Also believes rights come from God, not human institutions. Pro-life, and anti-welfare per his basic credo the government has no business in people’s private lives. Quixotic lifetime of tilting at the windmills of out-of-control government, as a knight in hospital whites, looking to bring America back to simpler, more straightforward times. Alexander Acheson (1842-1934) - American physician, soldier and politician. Outer: Grew up in Pennsylvania, and was raised a Presbyterian. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he joined a local regiment as a private on the Union side. By 1863, he had become an officer, serving as aide-de-came to Gen. Nelson Miles. Showed himself to be brave in battle, and was shot in the face during one engagement, although recovered. Married Sarah Cooke in 1864, one daughter from the union. After the fighting, he returned home and was given an honorary A.B. degree from his local college, before getting an M.D. degree from the Univ. of Penna. After establishing a practice in Philadelphia in 1872, he moved to Denison, Texas, where he served as Republican mayor for four terms, while convincing railroad magnate Jay Gould (Walter O’Malley) to run tracks through the town, insuring its economic solvency. Ran unsuccessfully for governor of Texas in 1906, and a decade later failed in his bid for a Senate seat, and later a seat in the U.S. House of Reps. Served as city physician of Denison from 1923 to 1929, and also was on a local bank’s board of directors. Held numerous other positions as well, while belonging to a host of organizations. Died at his home. Inner: Inveterate joiner, with his larger political concerns centered around waterways and the economic opportunities they represented. Prelude lifetime of setting up patterns, including moving from Pennsylvania to Texas, and pursuing both medicine and politics, that he would expand upon in his next go-round, as a champion of the individual against intrusive monolithic government.

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PATHWAY OF THE POLITICIAN AS CONSERVATIVE POPULIST:
Storyline: The maverick masochist suffers more than his share of punishment in his ongoing desire for the presidency, and the various routes he has taken in trying to achieve that elusive goal, as an increasingly more compromised voice of rebellious commonality.

John McCain III (1936) - American politician and naval pilot. Outer: (John Sidney McCain III) (1936) - American politician and naval pilot. Outer: Of British, Scottish, Scots-Irish descent, with distant Dutch ancestry. Born in the Panama Canal Zone, although he was a U.S. citizen by dint of his parents. Both his father and grandfather were four star naval admirals of the same name, whose military lineage dated back to 17th century Britain. His grandfather died within hours of returning home after WW II, so that each generation in his family would become obsessed with measuring up to the last one. Long-lived mother was a high-spirited twin whose sire made a fortune in alcohol, oil and gambling, while his own father gave him a rigid code of honor and a dark temper, so much so, that as a child his parents would plunge him into cold water to cool out his tantrums. Middle of 3, with an older sister and younger brother. Went to a boarding school in his teens to give him a sense of stability, although it only brought out his pugnacity and maverick sense of being an outsider, earning him the nickname of McNasty. 5’6”, with light brown eyes as well as extremely light-skinned and thin-skinned. Went to the U.S. Naval Academy, where he was a hel-lraiser within the confines of that institution, as well as a boxer. Graduated in the bottom 1% of his class, but was given the coveted position of aircraft carrier aviator, through family connections. While training in Florida, he crashed into the water, although survived it without injury. In 1965, he married Carol Shepp, a divorcee and former swimsuit model from Philadelphia, with two children of her own, one daughter from the union. Served in Vietnam as a Naval pilot and was injured in the legs and chest in a rocket accident aboard a carrier in 1967, which killed 134, and some sources say he set off, with others denying it. Later that year he was shot down by an anti-aircraft missile, breaking both arms and a leg. Saved from drowning by a Vietnamese man, then beaten afterwards by a mob, before being ultimately transported to Hanoi, and the infamous Hoa Lo Prison, known as the Hanoi Hilton. Offered the opportunity at repatriation, when it was discovered that his father was a naval commander-in-chief, but refused it, although was given preferential treatment, and also reputedly collaborated with sensitive info, allowing the North Vietnamese to readjust their air defense systems. Signed an anti-American propaganda message, then was beaten several times a week when he refused to sign a second one. Ultimately held as a prisoner of war for 5 1/2 years, until his release in 1973, when he returned to active duty, after painfully going through physical therapy for 9 months. 3 years later, he became the Navy’s liaison to the Senate, a position his father also held, and retired in 1981, with the rank of captain, within a week of his sire’s death. In 1999, he co-wrote a memoir of his experiences, “Faith of My Fathers.” Married a second time to Cindy Hensley in 1981, who was nearly 20 years his junior and heir to a fortune. Moved to Phoenix, Arizona, where he went to work for her father’s Budweiser beer distributorship, the country’s largest, which would ultimately make the duo worth nine figures, and give him the money, the connections and the place from which to launch a successful political career. The couple adopted a daughter from Bangladesh, to add to their own three children, two sons and a daughter, Meghan, who became a columnist, author and blogger and self-described liberal Republican. In 1982, he won a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives as a Republican, after his father-in-law backed his run, and 4 years later, he was elected to the Senate, winning reelection 3 more times, while gaining a reputation as a moderately conservative maverick. Tainted by his association with Arizona developer and savings & loan manipulator, Charles Keating, as one of 5 senators who aided him, although was accused only of poor judgment in the sordid affair. During this time, his wife became addicted to pain pills for an injured back, and wound up stealing drugs from a medical relief charity she had set up, before quitting cold turkey in 1992. Developed skin cancer the following year, and had two tumors removed in 2000. Ran for the Republican nomination for president in the same year, but was slimed in the South Carolina primary by Karl Rove, who cast aspersions on his wife’s mental stability, his adopted daughter’s skin color, and his own aftereffects of captivity. Lost the nomination to George W. Bush, thanks to further missteps, including criticizing evangelical icons Jerry Falwell and Pat Robertson as agents of intolerance. Swallowed his wounds, while despising the entire Bush team, and angrily lurched to the left, working with the Democrats on their agenda in the Senate, before supporting the President’s Iraq War policy, initially proclaiming it as a projected easy win. Continually called for more troops, when the military’s efforts in that country proved unsatisfactory. Easily won reelection in 2004 with 76% of his state’s votes, after turning down John Kerry’s offer to be his Democratic running mate. Began recourting evangelicals following the 2004 election to position himself as the candidate of the conservative wing of the Republican party for the 2008 presidential nomination. Gave the commencement address at Falwell’s Liberty Univ. in 2006, and went on to put together a team of advisers who had earlier skewered him. Forced into numerous compromised positions, turning from maverick to establishment spokesman, as his support steadily eroded. Fired over half of his staff because of his continued difficulty in raising money and support, and announced a preference for a Christian president, while flirting with a full-immersion baptism to make him a tried-and-true evangelical. Eventually securing the nomination in March of 2008, while hardcore conservatives continued to decry his candidacy. Code-named Phoenix by the Secret Service. Weathered smears from both the left and right, and tied his campaign to the ongoing Iraq War, in an attempt to sell himself as the only true warrior capable of leading the country in a time of great danger. Enjoyed an initial untouched run, until gaffes, lobbyists and evangelists forced him to disavow more and more support. In a surprise move, he bowed to party pressure and picked conservative Alaskan Gov. Sarah Palin as his runningmate after meeting her only once. Subsequently sounded the clarion call for change, while distancing himself from Washington, despite using the exact same cast of characters that advised and consented to the Bush presidency. His negativity, and inability to deal with the falling economy, would largely doom his chances, in the succeeding campaign, and he lost the election by a rough two-to-one margin in the electoral college, although graciously accepted his defeat. Dualistic in the Senate afterwards, supporting the president militarily but not economically, while taking the active role of loyal opposition, before reverting to a need for vindictive contrariety, just as he did following his defeat by George W. Bush in 2000. Easily won a 5th term in 2010, against a little-known opponent. Continually grandstanding afterwards around foreign policy, showing an unrelenting bitterness over his earlier electoral defeat by Obama as the angry and increasingly irrelevant old man of American politics. Returned to maverick status with a secret visit to Syrian rebels in 2013, while pushing for American involvement in the civil war there, despite great resistance from the public-at-large at the prospect, then showed himself to be an indiscriminate war-monger whenever and wherever hostilities subsequently erupted, while also continually voting against legislative benefits for veterans, showing no sympathy whatsoever for his fellow ex-service members for reasons entirely his own. Made chairman of the powerful Armed Services committee with the Republicans retaking the Senate in 2014, putting him in perfect position to involve America in the endless wars of the Middle East. Involved in a tougher-than-expected re-election bid in 2016 against Ann Kirkpatrick, forcing him to support Donald Trump as the party’s presumptive nominee, while directly blaming the president for a massacre at a gay Orlando night/club, much to the surprise and dismay of many. When his re-election seemed more assured, withdrew his support of Trump, following a tape revealing the latter’s extreme misogyny. Easily won his 6th term afterwards. Outraged by Russia trying to influence the 2016 election by hacking, calling it an act of war, and refusing to let party loyalty trump loyalty to country’s best interests. Continually opposed to many of Pres. Donald Trump’s moves, while still smarting from the insults he made about him during his presidential campaign, to the point of claiming Barack Obama provided far better leadership than him. In the summer of 2017, he had to have an operation to remove a blood clot over his left eye, which was quickly revealed as a brain tumor, putting him in a fight for his life. Returned to Washington afterwards from his sick bed to cast a deciding no vote to kill his party’s desire to repeal Obamacare in one finally dig at Trump. While undergoing treatment, a destroyer named after both his father and grandfather collided with an oil tanker, killing 10 sailors. Has a net worth of $100 million. Inner: Well-liked by his peers, but angry, moral, superstitious and a gambler at heart, who loves taking chances. Highly ambitious and more and more compromised as he has gotten older, while forever apologizing for gaffes and mistakes all throughout his political life. Unconsciously punishment-oriented as a means of testing his considerable capacity to take it. Timex lifetime of continually taking a licking, only to keep on ticking in a desire to resurrect from torturous situations and prevail as a well-loved leader, even when the times thunder by him. James Baird Weaver (1833-1912) - American politician. Outer: 5th of 13 children and eldest son of a skilled mechanic and millwright who moved his large family to a forest-enclosed farm. Served as a rural mailman, kept store and prospected for gold in California, before studying law in Bloomfield, Iowa, and later at the Cincinnatti Law School, before returning to Bloomfield to open up a law practice in 1856. Two years later, he married Clarissa Vinson, a school teacher, 5 daughters and 2 sons from the union. Originally a Democrat, he joined the newly formed Republican Party and became active in the abolitionist movement. At the start of the Civil War, he volunteered as a private in an infantry regiment, and was commissioned as a lieutenant in 1861. Fought in several key battles, where he showed both bravery and initiative under fire, and by war’s end, he had risen in rank to brevet brigadier general. Became active in Iowa politics, and began his career as a district attorney in 1866, although he wound up alienating the Republican Party regulars over his prohibitionism, and other moral stances, and he was denied nominations to both Congress and the governorship of Iowa in the mid-1870s. In response, he joined the Greenback Party, which championed silver as well as a graduated income tax, and an eight hour work day, among other progressive stances. In 1878, he was elected to the U.S. House of Reps on the Greenback ticket, and served until 1881. In 1880, he became the presidential candidate of the Greenback Party, coming in a distant third behind the eventual winner, Ulysses S. Grant, while garnering most of his support from the agrarian and rural elements of the midwest and west. The following year, he failed in his bid to gain a congressional seat. In 1884, he ran again, and this time proved successful for two terms, although he was defeated in 1888. When the Greenback Party began merging with the Democratic Party, he opposed the consolidation, and in response he co-founded the Populist Party in 1891, taking advantage of the agrarian discontent sweeping mid-America. In 1892, he became its candidate for the presidency, and took the progressive stance of trying to form alliances with the black population in the South, which led to both violence and voter intimidation. Nevertheless, he received over a million votes, and actually won four far Western states, as well as 22 electoral votes, in an environment where populism was becoming a stronger and stronger political force, particularly in the agrarian states our west. In 1896, he threw his support to Democratic populist William Jennings Bryan (Al Sharpton), under the mistaken assumption he would choose a Populist Party co-founder as his running-mate. Instead he picked a conservative opponent of trade unions, and lost the party’s support, as well as the election to William McKinley (Richard Nixon). Following his defeat, the Party went into eclipse and disappeared, although some of its platform later became law. Ended his political career as a mayor of a small town in Iowa at century’s new beginning. Inner: Able, respected and courageous. Strong sense of integrity and purpose. Populist lifetime of trying to exemplify and articulate the needs of commonality as an uncommon hero of the multitudes. Daniel Shays (Daniel Ogden Shays) (c1747-1825) - American soldier and rebel. Outer: Little known of his early life. Even his suspected hometown did not record his name. His father was probably an Irish immigrant who came to America as an indentured servant. Grew up poor, and worked as a farm laborer. Married Abigail Gilbert in 1772, eight children from the union.At the outbreak of the American Revolution, he volunteered and served with distinction at several early key battles, including Bunker Hill, so that he was commissioned a captain by early 1777. In 1780, he resigned from the army and settled in western Mass., where he held several town offices. The prosperity that had followed the war soon gave way to a severe depression and the Mass. legislature refused to recognize the urgency of the situation. Became one of several leaders of an armed rebellion, and his name would be forever associated with it as Shays Rebellion, which came to a head in 1786 with a confrontation with 800 armed farmers and an equal number of militiamen. An agreement was reached where the Mass. state court was adjourned so that the rebels would not be indicted, but fighting broke out the next winter when the rebels marched on the state arsenal, only to be scattered by state troops, with several killed and many wounded. Later defeated by Benjamin Lincoln (Walter Mondale), and fled to Vermont, although he was exempted from a general pardon. Condemned to death in absentia for treason, but he petitioned for a pardon, and was granted it in 1788. Ultimately given a $20 a month pension for his service in the Revolution, and continued to maintain that he had fought in the rebellion for the same principles that impelled the Revolutionary War. in 1818, he wed a widow, Rhoda Havens, no children from the union, which ended with his death.Eventually moved to NY state, where he died impoverished. The upshot of the rebellion was a strengthening of the federal government in dealing with such uprisings, as well as reforms in taxation and judicial procedure. No portrait of him exists, so that he remains a shadowy, albeit pivotal figure of early Americana. Inner: Principled, with a highly defined sense of justice. Inspired confidence in others. A warrior at heart, he had great respect for military protocol. Rebellious lifetime of giving populist strength to the burgeoning United States, despite suffering for his principled stance, in his ongoing need to be both maverick and redresser of social ills, no matter the cost to himself.

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PATHWAY OF THE POLITICIAN AS REGRESSIVE PROGRESSIVE:
Storyline: The ambivalent striver always manages to monkey wrench his trajectories, either through monkey business, or internalizing his existential angst, as an emblem of his own dual feelings about personal power and his deep-seated dualistic desires to either flex it or be flummoxed by it.

Gary Hart (Gary Hartpence) (1936) - American politician, professor and author. Outer: Had a small-town midwestern upbringing with a puritanical mother, who left him with ambivalences galore, both about power and women. Father was a farmer and farm equipment salesman. Committed to a religious vocation since childhood, he attended Bethany Nazarene College, and was deeply affected by the works of Soren Kierkegaard (Edward Albee), another master of either/or ambivalence. 6’, slender, with blue eyes. In 1959, he married Lee Ludwig, in what would prove to be a union marred by his constant inconstancies, daughter and son. Intended on becoming a minister and graduated Yale Divinity School, but while there, he began to see other forms of service in the secular sphere that would serve him far better, and in 1960, he got his first taste of presidential politics when he volunteered for JFK’s successful run for the White House. The year after, he shortened his name from Hartpence to Hart as prelude to his own desire for a political career. Graduated Yale Law School in 1964, and became an attorney for the U.S. Dept. of Justice for two years, then continued in Washington as a special solicitor for the US Dept. of the Interior for the two annums following. Moved to Denver, and had a private law practice there over the next 7 years, which was interrupted when he ran George McGovern’s unsuccessful 1972 presidential campaign. Despite the failure, he made the Iowa caucuses a key Democratic element in succeeding presidential elections, giving those with the best grassroots organizations the best chance of winning there, rather than the Party’s presumptive establishment nominees. Despite guiding McGovern to one of the worst shellackings of the 20th century, he won a U.S. Senate seat for himself two years later, for the first of two largely unmemorable terms. In 1984, he made his first presidential run, presenting himself as the candidate of “new ideas.” Code-named Redwood by the Secret Service. Loaded up in the early primaries to become a contender, but his fudging of facts, including his name and birth year, along with his shaky marriage and increasingly ill-managed campaign damaged him beyond repair. His successful opponent, former Vice-President Walter Mondale, countered his claims of innovation with “Where’s the Beef?” in an allusion to a successful hamburger commercial’s plaint of a rival’s lack of substance, and it was good enough to undo him. In 1987, as the frontrunner for the same nomination, he challenged reporters to follow him, after rumors of his infidelity surfaced. Photos subsequently emerged of model Donna Rice sitting on his lap on his boat appropriately named ‘Monkey Business’ in Bimini, which forced him to drop out of the race soon afterwards, although not before denying he ever had a relationship with her. Somehow, his marriage would survive all the untoward publicity, and he and his wife would stay together through the next century. Reentered the race 7 months later, but quickly saw he had spent his supportive coin with the earlier incident. Finished his second Senate term, and then permanently bowed out of elective politics to resume his law practice. In 1998 he was named to a bipartisan commission to study America’s ability to fend off terrorism. The commission’s findings, which suggested a National Homeland Security Agency, were published in 2001, and roundly ignored, until September 11th of that year. The same annum, he earned a Ph.D. in politics from Oxford Univ., and in 2006 became a professor at the Univ. of Colorado. The author of numerous books tying the political past with the present, he is also a blogger at “The Huffington Post,” and an occasional talking torso on TV. Inner: Thoughtful, albeit largely ineffectual. Beefless lifetime of virtually throwing away the presidency through the hubris of feeling he was above the pettiness of politics, only to become a footnote, rather than a major player as he had previously been, through the auspices of a dynamic partnership, which he failed to generate this time around via his thoroughly unresolved ambivalences. Robert LaFollette (1855-1925) - American politician. Outer: Of French and English descent. Born in a log cabin to pioneer farmers. His father, who was assessor and town clerk as well, died when his son was eight months old, and his mother subsequently remarried, although he did not get along with his stepfather. Worked as a youth on the farm, and following the death of his second sire, his mother sold their modest acreage, and moved to the nearby city of Madison, Wisconsin. Short and slender, with high hair and a resonant voice. Originally wanted to be an actor. Taught school to go to the University there, although much preferred socializing to college academics. His strongest skill proved to be oratory, and in his senior year he won an interstate oratorical contest, before graduating in 1879. While in school, he met Belle Case (Naomi Wolf), who also won oratorical honors. The duo married two years later, with the word ‘obey’ deliberately omitted from the ceremony. His lookalike and act-alike wife would become the first woman to graduate from the University law school, before becoming a lawyer and an active suffragette and feminist, and would prove an extremely important influence on her husband, and the basic difference between him and his succeeding incarnation in this series. Four children from the union, with one son becoming governor of Wisconsin, and the second of the same name succeeding his sire as Senator, and both continuing in the progressive traditions forged by their progenitor. Passed the bar in 1880, after only briefly attending law school, and soon afterwards launched his political career as a Republican county district attorney, an office he held for two terms. Went on to serve three terms in the U.S. House of Representatives, initially as its youngest member. While there, he championed minority rights and gained a national reputation as a debater . Served on the House Ways and Means Committee under future president William McKinley (Richard Nixon), although his support of an unpopular tariff act, cost him his seat in 1890, in what would be a Democratic landslide. Returned to Madison to finally begin his private law practice, while staying extremely active in Republican politics. In 1891, he announced that the state Republican boss had offered him a bribe to fix a court case. Through this and other instances, he saw that his party had lost its earlier idealistic ways and become a tool of corporate interests. Began building a progressive block within the party to counteract the trend, creating a divide that would become known as the Insurgents and the Stalwarts. An economic panic and depression in 1893, helped their cause immeasurably, and he found an extremely responsive audience to his calls for more direct participatory democracy, including the direct election of nominees in party primaries. Rode the disaffection to the Wisconsin state house as governor in 1901, enjoying the largest plurality ever, and won successful reelection in 1902 and 1904, while becoming more and more of a national figure. His reforms, however, were blocked by the party’s Stalwarts, so he decided to cross partylines, and created a coalition with progressive-leaning Democrats. His progressive “Wisconsin Idea” would come to serve as a model for enlightened government, as he fought for business regulation and conservation. In 1906, he took a seat in the U.S. Senate, sans election, and would hold that office until his death. Came to be known as “Fighting Bob,” as he fought for regulations over big business, although he was continually blunted in that chamber by the champions of saidsame. Found himself periodically prey to an internal nervous disorder, as well. In 1909, he founded LaFollette’s Weekly Magazine, which promoted racial equality, women’s suffrage, peace and other progressive causes dear to his heart. His wife would contribute to it with a regular column, and after his death it would become The Progressive in 1929. In 1912, he made his first bid for the Republican nomination for president, but subsequently had a public mental meltdown early in the year during a speech to magazine editors, and his supporters went over to former Pres. Theodore Roosevelt (Kathleen Kennedy), and his own newly-formed Bull Moose Party. The divide would insure Woodrow Wilson’s (Michael Eric Dyson) win, whom he bitterly went on to support. Both his wife and daughter, an actress, would become even more active in their call for voting rights for women, although his opposition to America’s entering WW I, and promotion of freedom of speech during wartime, would cause him to be accused of treason and worse, and he and his family to be ostracized and roundly condemned. When the 19th Amendment, the women’s voting rights act, was passed in 1919, Wisconsin was the first state to ratify it. Remained a liberal leader in Congress, and in 1924, he ran for the presidency on the Progressive ticket, and an anti-imperialistic, pro-labor and civil liberties platform. Won over 5 million popular votes and came in third to the two major parties, although the run sapped his strength and he died the following summer of heart disease. His wife turned down the opportunity to finish his term, and it fell to his same-named son to do so, which would launch his own political career, as a four term senator from Wisconsin. Inner: Highly idealistic, and a genuine and articulate voice of equality on all levels of society, with a gift for pure oratory. Able to weather all sorts of attacks on his person because of his stands, although not without resentment and bitterness, which he would internalize. Co-cohort lifetime of setting a pattern for self-destruction around the elusive office of the presidency, despite a memorable run as a progressive equalizer of America’s various social and economic imbalances, thanks in no small part to a dynamic partner who completely shared both his drive and ideals. Rufus King (1755-1827) - American politician and diplomat. Outer: Eldest son of a successful merchant. His brother William went on to become the first governor of Maine, while his half-brother Cyrus became a U.S. Congressman. 5'10". Graduated Harvard in 1777, during a time when some of its buildings were occupied for military purposes. While studying law afterwards, he served in the Revolutionary War as an aide and received an honorable discharge. Later admitted to the bar, where he established a good reputation for himself as an eloquent speaker, and in 1783, he was sent to the general court of Massachusetts. In 1786, he married Mary Alsop, the well-cultivated and remarkably beautiful daughter of a congressman. Five sons from the union, two of whom went on to serve in the Congress, while the other three were, respectively, president of Columbia College, the founder of Cincinnati Law School, and a respected physician. Held numerous posts, and in 1787, he was made a delegate to the Continental Congress. Played a significant role, helping to craft the final draft of the U.S. Constitution, while working closely with fellow Federalist Alexander Hamilton (JFK). Supported a strong central government, and was also vehemently opposed to slavery. Returned to Massachusetts afterwards, and was an instrumental figure in aiding the somewhat reluctant state to ultimately adopt the document. Gave up his law practice and moved to NY in 1788, and the following year he was elected to the state assembly, where he helped put the new government into active operation, before becoming one of the state’s first U.S. Senators, as a Federalist. Used his position to help create the first Bank of the United States. In 1796, he was appointed during his second Senate term as Minister to England, a post he held for six years through the full and partial terms of the first three presidents. A skilled diplomat, he served the national interest well, and maintained excellent ties with the mother country, before being relieved at his own request in 1803, after which, relations deteriorated between Great Britain and the U.S. Bought a farm in Jamaica, NY, and busied himself with an extensive correspondence and reading, while unsuccessfully running for the vice presidency in 1804 and 1808. Opposed the War of 1812, but supported it once it was launched, before entering public life again via the U.S. Senate. In 1816, he was nominated without his knowing it, for governor of NYC, although he lost the election. The same year, he failed in his bid for the presidency as a Federalist, losing to James Madison (Michael Eric Dyson), and wound up as the final presidential candidate from his party. Elected to the Senate in 1819, where he opposed the admission of Missouri as a slave state, as well as the ultimate Missouri Compromise offered by Henry Clay (Hubert Humphrey). Weathered the death of his wife at the same time, and declined reelection. Reluctantly ended his career as Minister to Great Britain, although failing health curtailed that appointment, and sent him sailing home after a few months, to die at his farm. Inner: Eloquent and a gifted orator, with a strong humanitarian impulse, and great loyalty to his Federalist party. Gentlemanly, but also haughty and austere in manner. There at the beginning lifetime of playing a strong role in the formation of the United States, despite ultimately being rejected as its head, a quest that he would continue to pursue with the same unsatisfactory results and in more and more self-destructive manner over the next near two centuries.

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PATHWAY OF THE POLITICIAN AS CANTANKEROUS REFORMIST:
Storyline: The independent ideologue brings his class-oriented agenda to the public debate, as a charisma-challenged champion of his ideal of a far more equitable comic American working society.

Bernie Sanders (Bernard Sanders) (1941) - American politician. Outer: Of Polish Jewish descent on his paternal side and Polish and Russian Jewish descent on his maternal. Born the day the 900 day siege of Leningrad began by the Nazis, in which over 2 millions Russians starved to death. Father was a Polish Jewish immigrant, who lost most of his extended family in the death camps in Europe. Mother was the daughter of Polish Jewish immigrants. His progenitor worked as a paint salesman, although his family was never able to realize home ownership. Younger of two brothers, with his older sibling Larry becoming a British politician. Ran for the track team as well as student body president in high school, which he lost. Later bought a plot of land in Vermont and ran a summer camp for underprivileged NYC children there. 5’8” with brown eyes and average build. Spent a year studying psychology at Brooklyn College, then transferred to the Univ. of Chicago. While there, he joined the Young People’s Socialist League and was very active in the civil rights movement, which took up most of his time, so that he barely graduated, receiving his B.A. in political science in 1964. Briefly worked for Head Start in NYC, then spent a half year on a kibbutz in Israel, which fostered a desire to bring the same sense of agrarian socialism back to Vermont. Moved to a small shack in Vermont and married a college girlfriend only to divorce several years later, one son from the union. During this time, he worked as a writer, documentary producer and researcher. Became politically active, joining the anti-Vietnam War movement in 1971 and subsequently made several failed bids for the U.S. Senate under the banner of the fringe Liberty Union Party. Supported himself by traveling the state and selling education film strips, including a 30 minute documentary on socialist Eugene V. Debs (Angela Davis) his political hero. Set his political sights lower, and in 1981 he won the mayoralty race in Burlington, Vermont’s largest city, by ten votes, running as a democratic socialist, which deeply disturbed the city and state’s political establishment. Subsequently didn’t help matters when he established sister city relationships in the USSR and Nicaragua, visiting Managua at one point to show his solidarity with the Sandinistas. While in office, however, he reformed city government, which had been in the hands of a political machine and developers for decades. In their stead, he created affordable housing, as well as an atmosphere for profitable, socially conscious local businesses, while making the city far more livable, and, in the process, gained national recognition for his work during his four two year terms. In 1988, he married Jane O’Meara, a divorcee with two daughter and a son, who had been president of Burlington College, and was raised Catholic. The same year, he ran as an Independent for a vacant House seat but lost, then ran again two years later and won, becoming the first Independent in the House in four decades. In the interim period he taught political science at Harvard and Hamilton College. Subsequently re-elected seven times, setting a record for Independents in the House. Supported the war against terrorism, although opposed the U.S. invasion of Iraq. In 2006, he was elected senator from Vermont, in the most expensive campaign in the state’s his/story and re-won the post 6 years later by capturing 71% of the vote. During his first term he cofounded the Congressional Progressive Caucus, to become a voice for the left during a time of Republican control of the airwaves, congress and public debate. A blusterer, with little subtlety about him, he found niche issues he could champion like tax reform, national health care, fighting for the collapsing middle-class, cutting military spending and promoting affordable housing, while his major concern was class divides, rather than racial or gender identity ones. Also fought against the concentration of media ownership in a select few hands, and for making campaign finances more transparent. A continual critic of the George W. Bush administration, as well as the extreme right wing’s desire to privatize various government institutions, such as Social Security, the VA and Medicare, he also caucused with the Democratic Party, although showed limited insider clout with them, with some criticizing him as little more than a liberal. Announced in 2015 that he was going to run for the presidency as the first challenger to Hillary Clinton from the left and as a means of putting his agenda forth and moving the Democratic party more in a populist direction, away from big money in a declared war on the billionaire class. Able to draw large crowds who resonate with his message of taking America back from the corporations and oligrachs who own it, while worrying the Clinton campaign enough to attack him as unelectable as he steadily climbed in the polls to present himself as a viable candidate capable of winning both the nomination and presidency, despite having no official Democratic endorsements. Invited to speak at fundamentalist Liberty Univ., he brought his own small audience, while underlining both his differences with the students and teachers, as well as the common cause he shared with them, in their mutual desire to redress the economic and social imbalances in American society. Defused Clinton’s e-mail scandal at their first debate, and, in a sense, allowed her, her front-runner status, while his impassioned anti-corporate agenda didn’t play as well in the studio as it did to his own enthusiastic partisan crowds, although he still managed to rake in over $1m in support afterwards, while social media declared him the debate winner. Followed it up with a fiery performance at the high profile fund-raising dinner in Iowa that often raises the prospects of Democratic candidates. Forced to sue the DNC after it suspended his access to the party’s voter files, thanks to a staff member tapping into his opponent’s own confidential voter info, in a move by the establishment to blunt his campaign, although later handed them back. Wound up in a virtual tie with Hillary in the opening Iowa caucuses, with overwhelming youth support, making him a player. Won 60% of the vote in the New Hampshire primary, although Hillary carried the super-delegates, giving her an advantage despite his lopsided win. Won four states, including his own on Super Tuesday, while raising enough money to last until the convention. Despite a thorough drubbing on the second Super Tuesday, remained unbowed, and began winning primaries again in the West, to remain a contender. Saw his streak end with a solid Clinton victory in NY, then lost 4 out of 5 in NE, forcing him to cut his staff. Continued his fight, even though Clinton notched the nomination before the end of the primary season, with super delegates in tow, and a desire to strongly affect the Democratic Party platform. Finally endorsed Hillary weeks before the convention, much to the disappointment of some of his followers, and later gave his approval to her moderate running-mate, Tim Kaine. Gave the keynote address at the DNC stressing unity, after an earlier obstreperous display by his supporters in the Philadelphia streets emphasizing the opposite and has remained solidly in the Clinton camp throughout the subsequent going. Formed a new political committee afterwards, Our Revolution, while putting his focus on beating vulnerable Republicans in their senate races. Given a new position in the subsequent Senate, “Chair of Outreach,” his first leadership post. Following the elections, he published “Our Revolution: A Future to Believe in,” a self-styled blueprint for the future that largely rehashed the ideas he presented during his campaign. In 2017, he launched a live show on Facebook, in order to get his message out to younger people, and has made numerous appearances in various states to continue his self-appointed role as progressive message-bearer. Has a net worth of $500,000. Inner: Given the Secret Service code name of Intrepid, as a nod to his tenacity. Highly individualistic and contentious, with little patience for people who tell him what to do. Self-righteous with the facility for alienating natural allies, thanks to a decidedly uncharismatic character, although has never run a negative ad, preferring in his public stances to emphasize the positive. Unlike all other candidates has promised to raise taxes, per standard socialistic convention in order to cover his desire for free education and medical care for one and all.Identifies culturally but not religiously with Judaism, and is pro-Israel, but anti its rightwing government. Plain-spoken lifetime of bringing his sense of rightness and fair play into national politics, as a self-appointed socialistic voice of the voiceless, with an overriding emphasis on class distinctions, and out-of-balance economics. Ben Hanford (Benjamin Hanford) (1861-1910) - American printer and politician. Outer: Of multi-generational American stock. Lost his mother as an infant. Father remarried a woman who gave him both intellectual and cultural interests, including a love of literature. Had no formal schooling, and was largely disconnected his first three decades, until he discovered an ideology worth pursuing and fighting for. Went to work for an Iowa newspaper, the Marshalltown Republican as a boy, where he became a printer. Had a slight built, with piercing eyes. At 18, he moved to Chicago and joined the Chicago Typographic Union, and remained a dues paying member the rest of his life. After living in Washington he moved to NYC in 1892, where he continued to labor as a printer, while becoming involved in union activity as a member of Local 6 Became a socialist the following year through the auspices of Fred Long a fellow printer and joined the Socialist Labor Party, which suddenly gave his life meaning. Began touring the country for his political beliefs, while penning articles, booklets and leaflets, creating Jimmie Higgins, an anonymous worker who was nobody and then again everybody as the backbone of the socialist labor movement. Proved an effective orator, thanks to a sensitivity to ordinary language, and in 1898, he was the party’s nominee for governor of NY. After a split in the ranks, he helped reorganize it in 1899 and ran twice more times for governor, as well as mayor of NYC in 1901, losing each time. After more splits, the party merged with the Chicago-based Social Democratic Party under the aegis of Eugene V. Debs (Angela Davis) to become the Socialist Party of America. In 1904, in their first foray into presidential politics, he ran as vice-presidential candidate to Debs’s presidential aspirant, and together they garnered a little over 400,000 votes, which represented nearly 3% of the total. The duo ran again in 1908, roughly receiving slightly more votes and a slightly lower percentage. The same year he married. His health broke during the campaign in California, and from then on he was racing against death, as well as the capitalist system. Spent his last years writing for the New York Call. Confined to bed because of consumption at the end, he wrote one last message “I would that my every heart’s beat should have been for the working class and through them for all humanity.” Cremated afterwards. Inner: Good communicator, ultimately giving his life for his cause because of overwork and a frail constitution. No one ever called him Benjamin in his desire to be no one special, and yet an ardent ideologue eager to uplift the lives of the working class. Rank and file lifetime of finally finding meaning in his existence through socialism and the labor movement, and subsequently dedicating it to the ideologies he embraced, wearing himself out prematurely in the process. Thomas Dongan, 2nd Earl of Limerick (1634-1715) - Anglo/Irish soldier and colonial governor. Outer: From an old Catholic Anglo-Irish family. 7th and youngest son of a baronet and Irish Parliament MP. At the execution of Charles I (Prince George) in 1649, his family, who were staunch royalists, all moved to France. Served in an Irish regiment under French general Henri Turenne and rose to the rank of colonel by 1674. Returned to Great Britain in 1674, per the government’s recalling of all its subject in French service. Continued his military career and in 1678, he was appointed Lt-Governor of Tangiers. Four years later he was selected to govern the Province of New York in the American colonies. At the time it was bankrupt and in a state of rebellion. Proved an extremely able lawgiver, convening the first representative assembly of the province, while making its members coequals to and independent of the British parliament. Established town county and general courts of justice, while granting the right of religious freedom, as well as constitutional liberties, as an extremely progressive legislator. His programs became the constitutional basis for the ultimate United States nearly a century later. Elements of the government he helped create were also ultimately adopted by the mother country after the colonial war of independence. Much of his work was dissolved under order of James II (Martin Sheen), and he was forced to retire to his estate on Staten Island, before fleeing for safety in the upheaval that followed. In 1691, he returned to Great Britain..Became the 2nd Earl of Limerick on the death of his older brother William in 1698. Died poor and without direct heirs, having never married. The title became extinct on his death, although it was revived in 1803 for a second run by the Pery familly, who held the viscountcy of Limerick. Inner: Great personal charm, with abundant integrity, courage, tact and a good sense of humor. Ahead of his time lifetime of helping cement constitutional democracy in the colonies, per his progressive political thinking, only to ultimately fall victim to his lack of concern for his own material well-being.

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PATHWAY OF THE POLITICIAN AS PUBLIC PERFORMER:
Storyline: The star-crossed statesman parlayed his theatrical skills and his telegenic presence into a viable run for a position he long coveted - name above title of the presidency, although failed to achieve it

Fred Thompson (Frederick Dalton Thompson) (1942-2015) - American actor and politician. Outer: Both parents were exceptionally tall, and neither had gone past the 8th grade in school. Father was a used-car salesman, who became a state park inspector. 6’5 1/2,” 220lbs, and athletic, he played both football and basketball in high school, where he was class clown. In 1959, at the age of 17, he had to get married, after impregnating Sarah Lindley, the daughter of a prominent family. Grudgingly accepted into their embrace, after which his in-laws oversaw his career. Was soon serially the father of two daughters and a son, with his wife, who had been a year ahead of him in school, working to help pay for his education. Raised in the Church of Christ, a minority sect, although an infrequent church-goer. Became the first member of his family to go to college, when he went to Florence State, before transferring to Memphis State Univ., graduating with a degree in philosophy and political science. Got a law degree from Vanderbilt Univ. Law School in 1967, and went into practice with his wife’s uncle. Co-founded his county’s first Young Republican’s Club, and came to the attention of the state’s GOP elite, which gained him the position of asst. U.S. attorney in Nashville from 1969 to 1972, where his theatrical courtroom style was extremely effective. Helped unseat longtime senator Al Gore, Sr. then worked as Republican campaign manager for Senator Howard Baker’s successful re-election bid in 1972, which led to his first high profile role as co-chief minority consul for the Senate Watergate Committee. Credited with framing, although not asking, the question, “What did the President know, and when did he know it?" that ultimately led to Richard Nixon’s downfall. Beforehand, however, he informed the White House of what he was going to ask, which led to the famous self-protective 18 minute tape-gap. Nixon had earlier characterized him as dumb, but friendly, while he exploited his position into a second career as a high-priced Washington lobbyist. Later wrote “At That Point in Time,” about his Watergate experience. As a lobbyist he also represented an abortion’s right group, and over most of the next 20 years, worked as a defense attorney in personal injury suits and white collar crimes, but also served as a special counsel for several Senate committees, making sure to keep his name in front of the public. His clientele included corporations, both domestic and foreign, and he served on various corporate boards, as well, in a high profile legal career. In 1985, he divorced his wife after over a quarter of a century of marriage, and at the same time, he inaugurated his acting career by playing himself in Marie, based on a Tennessee Parole Board scandal where he was defense attorney for the main plaintiff. That role led to a career on both the large and small screen, occasionally playing villains, but more often straight-talking southern governmental figures and attorneys, thanks to a solid physical presence, and the ability to project a persona redolent with authority. In 1994, he was elected to finish the last two years of Vice President Al Gore’s senate term, after a caretaker had done the previous two. Took advantage of the Republican resurgence at the time, and won a landslide upset victory over a longtime Nashville congressman, as a good ole boy in jeans and a pick-up truck, after first feeling unhappy and straight-jacketed as a conventional candidate. Ran for a full term in 1996, and handily won, although had an unremarkable senatorial run, noted mostly for his conservative voting record, while garnering a reputation for laziness. In 2000, he became John McCain’s national campaign co-chairman, in the Republican primaries, while his name was put forth as a potential vice-presidential candidate. Although he gave indication he would run again after 9/11/2001, the death of a daughter from a prescription drug overdose in early 2002, soured him on remaining in the Senate, and at the nearend of his term, he joined the cast of NBC’s longrunning series, “Law and Order,” playing attorney Arthur Branch, a role he would also assay upon occasion on several of “L & O’s” spinoff shows. After being linked to several high profile girl friends, he married Republican consultant Jeri Kehn in 2002, daughter and son from the union. His second wife would be younger than his oldest child, and would serve as an extremely important political adviser to him. Became a radio analyst in 2006, using that podium to spell out his platform as a prelude to a run for the presidency. Announced his candidacy on the Jay Leno show in September of 2007, and then proceeded to pile on the gaffes, while struggling to find an effective campaign voice, as well as evincing a remarkable ignorance around the issues. His lackadaisical approach would be in direct contrast to his wife’s overt eagerness and micro-managing, causing confusion in his staff and much questioning over whether he truly wanted the position or not, by both co-workers and electorate alike. Eventually dropped out of the race after a poor showing in the South Carolina primaries, and became the principle back-up on radio for conservative commentator Paul Harvey. Set an all-time record for throat-clearing at the Republican National Convention in 2008, while giving a gung-ho John McCain endorsement, in what would be his national political last (har-rumph) hurrah. Announced his retirement from politics afterwards, and a return to his acting career. Died at home surrounded by his family, from a recurrence of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma he had first contracted in 2004. Inner: Despite a reputation for indolence and lack of discipline, he projected a telegenic avuncular image, allowing him to feed into the fantasies of that part of the electorate hungering for another Ronald Reagan. Natural storyteller, and folksy, but also brusque, and often caught scowling. Second act lifetime of exploring his theatrical skills far more directly, for a far more serious run at an office he has long dreamed of achieving. William Borah (1865-1940) - American politician. Outer: Of Irish and Bohemian descent. One of 10 children of a hard-working farmer, who was a devout Presbyterian. His first ambition was to be an actor. Ran away from home as a youth and joined a rundown Shakespearean company, although they weren’t able to feed him properly and he returned to the farm. Had a lifelong love of the Bard afterwards. The possessor of unusually small feet, which he expensively shod later on, in his singular display of personal ostentation. Went to the Univ. of Kansas, but contracted TB and was forced to leave after his first year. Recoved and worked his way through law school afterwards, passing the bar in 1887. Proved to be a great jury pleader, thanks to his Shakespearean background, and sense of audience. A chance meeting on a train took him to Boise, Idaho, where he settled in 1890. After working as secretary to the state’s governor, he married his daughter, Mary McConnell, in 1895, no children from the union. Amassed a good deal of money by being the attorney for the state’s largest lumber and mining companies, although lived so simply, many people always thought he was relatively poor. Lost his first bid for the Senate as a Republican in 1903, when he refused to compromise himself with the state’s caucus, but came roaring back 3 years later to win the legislature’s nod, and remained in that position the rest of his life, serving 7 presidents, to become Idaho’s longest-serving senator ever. Even though he had disagreements with most of them, all respected him, and he became known as “the Lion of Idaho.” After gaining his senate seat, he came to national prominence in the trial of Wobbly ‘Big Bill’ Haywood, who, along with 2 others, was charged with killing the former Idaho governor. Served as prosecuting attorney against Clarence Darrow (Morris Dees), winning the respect of the latter, while failing to convict Haywood. Because of his principled stances, which often sat at odds with his fellow GOPers, he was called, “the Great Opposer.” Following WW I, he uncompromisingly opposed Woodrow Wilson’s League of Nations, as well as the Versailles treaty which ended the conflict. Toured the country against both, and then gave an impassioned speech in the Senate, which was largely credited with the Senate’s rejection of each. Had a longtime affair with Alice Roosevelt Longworth, and was rumoured to be the biological father of a daughter that she largely ignored. From 1925 to 1933, he was Chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, where he was pro-Soviet Union, wishing for recognition for the Stalinist state, which held him in high regard for doing so, particularly in the anti-communist attitude and Red Scare of the 1920s. Helped uncover the scandals of the Harding administration, and refused to endorse Herbert Hoover’s re-election bid in 1932, during the Great Depression. Subsequently supported some of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal legislation, although in 1936, he made a bid for the presidency in order to revive the progressive wing of his party. Failed to gain much traction from his party, and as in the previous presidential election, refused to support either candidate. Throughout his career, he showed himself to be independent and a champion of the underdog, while his larger reputation rests on his strong isolationist views, with his overweening nationalistic desire to separate America from European interests. Opposed the draft, as well as the Lend Lease act to aid Britain in its fight against the Nazis, and exited prior to America’s entry into WW II, which he undoubtedly also would have resisted, at least initially. Always popular in his homestate, as well as with the press. Died of a cerebral hemorrhage. Inner: Headstrong and crusty, but well-liked because of his honesty and his genuine caring for his constituents. Excellent speaker, with a certain sense of role-playing in his public pronouncements. Lived simply, ate little, never entertained or socialized, but had an abiding love of the theater, which he faithfully attended. All-the-world’s a stage lifetime of using the Senate’s chambers as his proscenium, and giving a longtime performance memorable enough to make him one of that august’s body’s more noteworthy characters.

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PATHWAY OF THE SAILOR LOOKING FOR GREATER VISTAS TO CONQUER:
Storyline: The admirable admiral looks to expand his horizons over the volatile waters of politics, where his penchant for heroism is swallowed up by far more unstable seas, revealing his vulnerabilities when not in a pure martial arena.

John Kerry (John Forbes Kerry) (1943) - American secretary of state, senator and failed presidential candidate. Outer: On his maternal side, descended from the Winthrops who founded the Massachusetts Bay Colony, as well as the Forbes, another Brahmin clan who made its money in railways, tea and opium. Paternal grandfather was an Austrian Jew who changed his name from Kohn, and later committed suicide in Boston. Father, who was 6 at the time, never got over his bitterness over the loss, and became a lawyer and remote, austere character who worked for the foreign service, but never achieved his ambition of becoming an ambassador. 2nd of four children, with an older sister and younger sister and brother. Had a lonely childhood, moving from place to place, and boarding school to boarding school, both in America and abroad with a sense of rootlessness. His sire was also an avid sailor, who taught him to sail blindfolded to get an innate feel of the sea, while evening dinners often centered around policy discussions. Unpopular at prep school, with a reputation for selfishness, and an image of being ‘born old.’ Idolized JFK, once went sailing with him, good athlete, won varsity letters in soccer and lacrosse. 6’4”, 185 lbs., with blue eyes and a long angular face. President of the Political Union at Yale, and tapped for Skull & Bones, the elite secret society that also enlisted the Bushes. Enlisted in the Navy 4 months before graduating, and proved his mettle in battle, showing himself to be aggressive and cool under fire, a good leader who was considerate of his men. Wounded 3 times, and won both a Bronze and Silver Star for his heroics, despite being critical of Naval policy. After his discharge in 1970, he married Julia Thorne, the daughter of a diplomat and fellow child of privilege, and became an outspoken critic of the war as a member of Vietnam Veterans Against the War, garnering much national publicity before dropping out of the group, because he felt it was taking too radical a direction. His accusations of criminality against some of his fellow vets did not sit well with some, and would later come back to haunt him. Tossed his medals in a demonstration, although later admitted they were someone else’s; kept his own. Parlayed his subsequent celebrity into a political career, although he lost his first election in 1972 when he ran for Congress and was labeled a carpetbagger, as well as being targeted by the Nixon White House for his JFK pretensions. Went semi-catatonic after the defeat, coupled with his wife’s own bouts of depression with him, then studied law, and became an asst. district attorney for Middlesex County in the late 1970s, before going into private practice in 1979. Taught and did occasional TV news commentaries, and in 1982, became lt. governor of Mass., with Michael Dukakis. Won a seat in the Senate in 1984, against a popular Congressman, rallying veterans behind him. Divorced and had his marriage annulled in 1988, after a long painful separation, 2 daughters from the union. Wife went on to a career of her own, writing self-help books, and founding the Depression Institute, thanks to her own struggles with hyper-seriousness. In 1995, he married the outspoken widow of Sen. John Heinz, Teresa, gaining his share of the Heinz fortune in the process, making him a demi-billionaire. Won his seat twice more, showing himself to be a liberal and sensitive to veteran’s affairs, although never made any lasting mark in the Senate. Declared his candidacy for the presidency, although did not initially do well until the primary season, when he steadily amassed the delegate count to become the Democratic Party candidate in 2004. Code-named Minuteman by the Secret Service. In the subsequent election, was undone by a blitz campaign orchestrated by other veterans who had not forgotten his martial apostasies and planted grave doubts in the voting public about his qualities as a leader. Ultimately lost to incumbent Pres. Bush, allowing him to denigrate his Vietnam service and with his downfall, came a long hard look by the Democratic Party at itself. Passively accepted his defeat, despite much chicanery in the key state of Ohio, where Democratic votes were blocked or discounted, indicating he probably won. Maintained his anti-administration stance, and in the week before the midterms, botched a joke about the president, and once again turned into a lightning rod for Republican contumely. In early 2007, he announced he would not seek the 2008 nomination, and instead concentrate on ending the debacle of the Iraq War. Subsequently did nothing when a student was tasered by police in front of him, denying he even witnessed the event, in a further capitulation to his ongoing inability to directly involve himself with events around himself. Endorsed Barack Obama in the 2008 primaries, while ignoring his former running mate, Edwards. After the election, he was made chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, succeeding Joe Biden, then succeeded then succeeded Hillary Clinton as Secty of State. In Obama’s second administration, after the latter’s first choice, Susan Rice, ran afoul of Republican contumely. Kept busy in his early going, emptily pontificating while dashing back-and-forth between the middle and far east to little real effect. His wife, who never got over his 2004 defeat, suffered a seizure in 2013. Took an extremely aggressive stance with Syria, calling for violent reprisals for its use of chemical weapons, then scored his first diplomatic coup with his Russian counterpart in searching for a more measured and cooperative response to the ongoing crisis to resolve the massive disfavor in which the Syrian regime has been held. Continually tried to broker some sort of peace between Hamas and Israel in 2014, with mixed results, as their contretemps threatened to spill over into much wider war in the area so that ultimately his failed diplomatic efforts, turned off both sides, leaving him both furious and frustrated. Subsequently faced at the same time with the impossible task of putting together a Middle Eastern coalition against ISIL since each country there has its own agenda, and views different Islamic elements as inimical to their own interests. Failed to join the huge French rally for Charlie Hebdu in early 2015, in western reaction to the murder of many of its cartoonists, and was forced to grovel to make amends when he showed up later with apologies. Given the thankless task of spearheading U.S.-Iran diplomatic talks around the country’s nuclear capabilities, as the latter shows itself more and more a pre-eminent world player, and America less and less of a force in comparison. In the process, he was undermined in his negotiations by 47 Republican senators who sent a letter to Iranian hardliners saying any deal reached will last only as long as the Obama administration stays in an office, in a move running totally counter to their constitutional authority. Nevertheless, he helped spearhead a successful trade-off of dropped sanctions for a dismemberment of their nuclear weapons capabilities as part of a seven nation coalition in the spring of 2015, much to the displeasure of both Iranian and American hardliners. Broke his leg in Geneva a biking accident during negotiations, but returned to them afterwards to complete the deal. Saw the American flag raised over its embassy in Cuba for the first time in more than half a century, as he continues to personify controversial Obama administration diplomatic policy, evincing an adeptness at steering it over disputatious shoals. Became the first Secretary of State to visit the atomic bomb memorial in Hiroshima, opining it was a “harsh reminder of the threat of nuclear weapons.” Afterwards, began spearheading a warmongering call for American involvement in Syria by the State Department, and later called for Russia being charged with war crimes. Spent the last months of his tenure promoting a global focus on climate change with unprecedented visits to North and South pole bases, while blasting both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump for humiliating America in their extremely negative campaigning. Rebuked Israel for extended settlements on occupied land destroying any hope twixt for a two state solution, in his final major act as Secretary of State. Has a net worth of nearly $200 million. Inner: Aloof, driven, stiff and pompous, with a curious inability to defend himself, despite a basic warrior’s sensibility. Brahmin lifetime of actualizing his desire to expand his innate sense of heroism and leadership on the far more rocky seas of politics. ultimately finding a métier for himself in the realm of diplomacy, after earlier failing in his power bid for the ultimate prize of the presidency. George Dewey (1837-1917) - American admiral. Outer: Father was a doctor, who imbued his three sons with a strong religious moral sense. Youngest of the trio, with one younger sister. Mother died when he was 5. Had an athletic upbringing and studied at Norwich Univ. before graduating from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1858. Served in the Mediterranean, and then was made executive officer of the Mississippi. In 1867, married Susan Goodwin, the daughter of the ex-governor of New Hampshire. His wife died 5 years later after the birth of their son.Studied at Norwich Univ. and graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1858. Served in the Mediterranean, and then was made executive officer of the Mississippi. The same year, he married Mildred McLean Hazen, a general’s widow and daughter of the owner of the Washington Post, although her Catholicism did not sit well with some. Saw naval action in the Civil War, before become duty officer aboard a series of ships. Given command of the Narragansett in 1871, and surveyed the Gulf of California. Promoted to captain in 1884, and rose in various bureaucratic posts, ultimately becoming a commodore in 1896, with a familiarity with the navy’s battleships, thanks to his position as President of the Board of Inspection and Survey. The following year he was given command of the Asiatic Squadron, after requesting sea duty. When the Spanish-American War broke out, he was thoroughly prepared for his assignment and sailed from Hong Kong in 1898 and destroyed the entire Spanish fleet in Manila Bay, without losing as much as a man, much less a ship while suffering only 7 of his own wounded. Opened the battle with the immortal words, “You may fire when you are ready, Gridley.” Unable, however, to capture Manila because of a lack of troop support. Sat in the harbor and guarded Manila, while dealing diplomatically with naval observers of other nations, before later assisting land troops in the subsequent occupation of Manila. He became an instant hero, and was made a rear admiral, and then admiral of the Navy in 1899, a position created specifically for him. The same year, married a second time. On his return home as a hero, he thought about running for the presidency, pronouncing publicly, “the office...is not such a very difficult one to fill,” although neither party took him up on that challenge. For the rest of his career he served, instead, through special provision because of his age, as president of the general board of the Navy Department, where he championed inter-service strategic planning. In 1913, he published his "Autobiography." Had arteriosclerosis at life’s end, which he kept secret because of a great need to project the illusion of physical vigor. Inner: Inner: Intelligent, conscientious, bold, aggressive and careful with a quick temper. Contained lifetime of being allowed to strut his stuff very late in his career, before acting dismissively towards the very office he would spend a lifetime subtly seeking the next time around. John Barry (1745?-1803) - Irish/American admiral. Outer: Father was a clerk in a malt house. Raised in Ireland as a Catholic, and went to sea at 11, before ultimately settling in the New World in Philadelphia at 15. Became a successful businessman and a merchant captain in the West Indian trade, with a commitment to the patriotic cause. Commissioned a captain in the Continental Navy in 1776, he saw considerable action during the Revolutionary War, including being forced to scuttle a ship in 1777 to keep it from enemy hands. Married twice, the second time to Sarah Austin in 1777. Both unions were childless, and in each instance his wives converted to his Catholic faith. Fought on land as well as sea, proving himself an adept warrior. Suffered defeats as well as victories, as well as a severe shoulder wound in 1781, and captured many prizes in the Atlantic and Caribbean in the early 1780s, including fighting the last naval action of the war in 1783. Retired from the Navy afterwards and returned to the merchant service, before being appointed senior captain in the U.S. Navy and given command of the U.S.S. United States in 1794. Ended the decade as commander of the West Indies squadron, and took U.S. peace commissioners to Europe to negotiate peace with France, having earlier traveled several times to that country. Ill-health curtailed the rest of his career, and he returned to Philadelphia, where he died 2 years later, as senior officer of the navy. Inner: Resourceful and tenacious, as well as a good teacher of future leaders. Before the mast lifetime of showing his mettle in battle, and curtailing his interests to the sea, as a place of business and combat, without any larger ambitions of leadership.

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PATHWAY OF THE ENTREPRENEUR AS SUPREME SELF SALESMAN:
Storyline: The egocentric CEO allows his supreme vanity to swallow his larger ambitions whole, as he expands on his previous go-round, without deflating his exaggerated sense of self-importance, leaving him vulnerable to his easily exposed flaws.

Herman Cain (1945) - American businessman, lobbyist, columnist, political candidate and radio host. Outer: Of African/American descent. Mother was a cleaning woman, father was a barber and janitor, as well as a chauffeur for Coca-Cola president Robert Woodruff, working three jobs so as to realize his dream of owning his own home. Along with a younger brother, he was raised in a Baptist household, where religiosity was emphasized. Went to a segregated school, which motivated him to work harder, rather than seek redress against the imbalances he grew up with, as he bent to the system, instead of trying to change it. Took up the trombone since it was needed in his high school band, and became its student-director the following year. The possessor of a pleasant singing voice, as well, which he has subsequently recorded. Graduated from Morehouse College in 1967 with a degree in mathematics. The following year, he married Gloria Etchison in 1968, in what would be a troubled union, since he was often traveling, and the two occasionally lived apart. His wife, his daughter and his son never publicly discussed his disconnected arrangement with them. Received an advanced degree in computer science from Purdue Univ, then worked as a mathematician in ballistics as a civilian employee of the U.S. Navy. Has also received a host of honorary degrees, while serving as an associate minister at Antioch Baptist Church North in Atlanta, a politically liberal but theologically conservative institution. Worked in computer systems for Coca-Cola, but didn’t want to known as the chauffeur’s son, and so moved to Minneapolis in 1977, and became director of business analysis for Pillsbury in 1977. In his mid-30s, he managed 400 Burger King stores for them in the Philadelphia area, winning plaudits for his efforts, which led to being appointed president and CEO of another Pillsbury subsidiary, Godfather’s Pizza, which he brought back to respectability by closing down restaurants and firing several thousand workers. Came to national attention when he challenged the Clinton health care plan in 1993 in a public debate with the president. Became a midwestern banker, before resigning his various other positions in 1996 and moving to Washington, D.C. to try for public office. From 1996 to 1999, he served as president and CEO of the National Restaurant Assoc., a lobbying organization, which gave him access to numerous Republican lawmakers, through his opposing various worker’s rights in favor of greater profits for owners. Moved back to Atlanta in 2000, and made an abortive run for the presidency the same year, and then a stab at senator from Georgia in 2004, failing to win any primaries in either race. Hosted his own talk radio show in Atlanta, while also penning a syndicated op-ed column, and becoming involved in Americans for Prosperity, a front group for special interests masquerading as an organization for economic opportunity for one and all. In 2006, he was diagnosed with colon cancer, although it went into remission via surgery and chemo. In mid-2011, he announced his candidacy for the presidency in a longshot bid, and began winning poll number approval among conservatives, for his genuine likability during the debate process, where he projected a down-to-Earth persona, and a can-do spirit, despite suggesting an electrified fence across the border to Mexico, to fry alive any illegal immigrants trying to cross it. Similar insensitive postures helped him steadily rise to the upper tier of Republican candidates in straw polls, before beginning to slide backwards. His simplistic 9-9-9 tax plan based on 9% levies in a trinity of arenas did not excite his base, although his complete lack of knowledge in the foreign policy realm did, in their embrace of honest ignorance as a welcome antidote to know-it-alls on the opposite side of the aisle. After being sidetracked with accusations of sexual harassment by a number of women, which he vehemently denied, his candidacy came to a thudding halt at year’s near end, after a former inamorata, Ginger White, came forward and admitted to a 13 year affair between them, citing his arrogance as the reason for her confession.Forced to terminate his Hermanator campaign, although he vowed he would continue to actively search for solutions to America’s problems, while pushing his 9-9-9 plan, as well as his autohagiography, “This Is Herman Cain! My Journey to the White House.” Determined to remain a national figure, he subsequently launched an internet TV network, “Cain TV,” parodying political figures from a right-wing perspective, then became a Fox news contributor, after deciding not to run for the senate, before creating an online channel in late 2014 for those willing to cough up $9.99 a month, to listen to him at all hours of the day. Inner: Eminently likable, with a good conventional business instinct, but an unintegrated unzipped female side that would eventually undo his quixotic try for CEO of America. The possessor of an enormous ego, and a messianic sense about his ability to save America from itself. Exclamation point lifetime of taking his game to the next level, as a minority eager to become a national figure and prove his self-worth in a host of different venues, per a self-view not quite in keeping with his larger and lesser abilities. Asa Griggs Candler (1851-1929) - American businessman, philanthropist and politician. Outer: One of 11 children of a prosperous Methodist merchant planter, who instilled within him a strong work ethic and an equally charitable sense of Christian obligation to those less fortunate than he. A younger sibling became a Methodist bishop. Began his career as a prescriptionist and in 1878, married Lucy Elizabeth Howard. Four sons and a daughter from the union. Began manufacturing patent medicines, and in 1888, bought the formula for Coca-Cola from John Stith Pemberton for $2300, immediately seeing its potential as a popular soft drink. Employing innovative advertising and marketing, which made its bottling highly recognizable, he created a product phenomenon, that would eventually be worldwide in its distribution. Although its formula would remain secret, it did not contain cocaine, despite its pick-me-up and somewhat addictive qualities, since the leaf at its heart was sufficiently diluted to be completely negligible. Strongly anti-alcohol, he objected mightily to some of the slang used to describe his product, which had drug overtones during its early years. Waged an extended and ultimately successful legal battle with the Food and Drug Administration who thought it contained cocaine, and then accused him of misbranding and false advertising. Invested in real estate and banking, creating Atlanta’s Central Bank and Trust, while erecting the Candler Building to house Coca-Cola, which was the tallest building in Atlanta at the time of its construction in 1906. Used his multimillion dollar fortune to help establish Emory Univ. as a Methodist institution, giving some $8 million to it, all told, while also donating generously to the Methodist Church. In 1916, he was elected as a reform mayor of Atlanta, and handed over his business responsibilities to his family, to focus on this secondary career, which lasted one two year term. Able to deal with the city’s convoluted finances, through his own considerable wealth, which helped establish Camp Gordon there, a military training facility during WW I. Lost his wife in 1919 and was engaged to a Louisiana socialite, who wound up unsuccessfully suing him for breach of contract, when he broke off the engagement. In 1922, his children sold control of the Coca-Cola company to a syndicate for $25 million, while he also divested himself of his banking holdings. In 1923, he married Mae Little Ragin, a widowed stenographer with twin daughters, in what would prove to be an unhappy union, that was probably based on her desire for his fortune. Tried to file for divorce, than later dropped the suit. Suffered a debilitating stroke in 1926, while giving away most of his fortune to Emory, keeping just enough to live on. Died of the aftereffects in 1929. Inner: Straitlaced, with an excellent instinct for business, and an equal sense of Christian charity and largesse. Later relationships would foreshadow a difficulty with his feminine side in his next go-round. Marketing guru lifetime of creating a brand for the ages out of a product culled from the dark side of nature, in his entrepreneurial desire to bring light to the world through his paternalistic beneficence.

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PATHWAY OF THE POLITICIAN AS PSEUDO-POPULIST:
Storyline: The low-key conservative rises from extremely modest circumstances to confound both critics and prognosticators alike with his ability to make his will manifest as a cut and spender with a mixed agenda geared towards an equally hybrid electorate.

George Pataki (1945) - American politician. Outer: Of Hungarian, Irish and Italian descent. Paternal grandfather emigrated to America in 1908 from Austria-Hungary. Maternal grandfather came to America from Italy. Father was a mailman, volunteer fire chief, and ran the family farm, which the grandparents owned. Younger of two brothers, with his older sibling a college professor. Went to public high school then entered Yale Univ. on scholarship with the same class as George W. Bush. 6’5”. Graduated in 3 years, while serving as chairman of the Conservative Party of the Yale Political Union,. Won an academic scholarship to Columbia Law School, where he was an editor of the Law Review, before receiving his J.D. in 1970. In 1973, he married Elizabeth Rowland, the daughter of a career army officer. Two daughters and two sons from the union. Went to work for a Peekskill law firm, Plunkett and Jaffe in 1974, ultimately becoming a partner, and wound up eliciting the help of another partner, Michael Finnegan, who would go on to manage his political career. Began it as mayor of Peekskill, a small town in Westchester County in 1981, before being handily re-elected. In 1984, he was elected to the NY State Assembly, then won three more terms, before Democrats redrew the district’s boundaries. Turned his political attention to the State Senate, which he won, before raising his sights to the governorship, despite being little known statewide. Polls to the contrary, he managed to defeat three-term governor Mario Cuomo in an upset, while pledging to serve only two terms, a promise he would later break. Got an endorsement from DJ and shock jock Howard Stern, which helped him immensely, and upstaters ushered him into office, as the first governor in over a half century not from NYC. Re-elected twice more by record margins, despite the Empire State being largely Democratic and most of its long list of governors in the 20th century of the same political persuasion. Enacted over $100 billion in tax cuts which created a host of new jobs, while also reducing welfare rolls by more than one million, and privatizing the World Trade Center, just before the infamous attack on it on 9/11/2001. Managed to wed liberal social stances with conservative fiscal policy, initially riding on the dot-com boom. Made cuts in education and health care funding, while doing battle with the state’s legislative branch over who had the power to set policy over the state budget, a fight he won in the judicial courts. Tried to make NY a center of high technology research, with the NY State Center of Excellence, a high-tech bioinformatics and life sciences research center at the heart of it. Oversaw environmental protection, with open space preservation, while focusing on the rivers around NYC. Signed an anti-discrimination law in 2002 to protect gay and lesbian New Yorkers. Seen by critics as a liberal in conservative clothing who broke most of his pledges, leaving the state intellectually if not fiscally bankrupt. Underwent an emergency appendectomy in 2006, then shortly afterwards needed more surgery to alleviate a blockage in his digestive system. In 2007, he joined a law firm focusing on environmental matters, while forming the Pataki-Cahill group with his former chief of staff John Cahill, a consulting firm specializing in providing strategy for both small and large companies in the energy, environmental and clean-tech fields. Announced that he was running for the GOP presidential nomination in May of 2015, although was given short shrift by most experts, despite his continual ability to confound political prognosticators. Unlike fellow Republican presidential hopefuls, feels abortion and same-sex marriage are distractions, rather than central issues, and need to be left up to individual states to decide. His candidacy never caught on, and he remained a second tier candidate throughout his run. His candidacy never caught on, and he remained a second tier candidate throughout his run, finally suspending his campaign at the end of 2015. Co-wrote “Pataki: An Autobiography, which was published in 1994. Inner: Low-key, and difficult to categorize, since he combines fiscal conservatism with liberal social sentiments. Multilingual with Spanish, French and German, as well as a little Hungarian. Adept illusionist lifetime of going against the grain in many of his stances, as a blue state Republican with a continual habit of confounding the poll-takers and experts in his ability to win over voters through his ongoing political legerdemain. Levi Morton (Levi Parsons Morton) (1824-1920) - American politician and banker. Outer: Named after an uncle, the first American missionary to Palestine. Father was a Congregationalist minister, who moved his family to a variety of New England towns per each of his postings. Youngest of four with two older sisters and an older brother. Raised in relatively poverty, he took a job in a country store, before doing manual labor. Taught in a country school for a year, then did another clerkship stint in a country store, where he learned bookkeeping. His boss had him run another store in NH, where he lived with the family of a Dartmouth College professor. 6’, straight-limbed with close cropped hair and a square jaw. Eventually married the latter’s daughter Lucy Young Kimball. When his employer went bankrupt, his chief creditor, James M. Beebe, hired him to join his company in Boston, which was the city’s largest importing firm. In 1854, he was sent to NY to take charge of the company’s operations there. Formed his own dry goods company the following year and in 1856, finally feeling solvent, he married Lucy Young Kimball, although she disliked his Old Testament name and began calling him L.P. by which both family and friends would refer to him as well. One son from the union who died in his 20s. Imported cotton from the South for New England’s textile industry, although with the advent of the Civil War, he lost his southern clients, and for the next decade spent his money paying off creditors, before deciding banking was a safer financial venue for him. In 1863, he founded a Wall Street banking house which would later become Morton, Bliss & Co., and within a decade he was one of the pre-eminent bankers in the country. Lost his wife in 1871 and two years later married Anna Livingston Reade Street, a member of NY’s old society, which brought him into politics with his wife’s charm and prudence an extremely helpful support. Six daughters from the union, with the eldest dying as an infant. In 1876, he became financial chairman of the Republican National Committee. Lost his first race for the House the same year, when his opponent painted him as a plutocrat and tool of Wall Street, although two years later he won, representing NYC’s fashionable 11th district. Identified with the “Stalwards” who promoted sound gold standard currency, and his political career was largely about supporting his private banking interests, as part of the Roscoe Conkling (Michael Dukakis) political machine. After disappointments over his desire for Treasury or the Vice-Presidency with the brief James Garfield (Coretta Scott King) administration, which ended abruptly in assassination, he settled for a post as ambassador to France for four years, proving to be a popular figure there. Returned to the U.S., and unsuccessfully ran for senator in 1885 and 1887 as part of Thomas Platt’s (George H.W. Bush) machine, although withdrew his name the second time, which put him in good stead for the vice-presidency, which he won in 1888, with Benjamin Harrison (Walter Mondale), losing the popular vote, but winning the electoral vote over Grover Cleveland (Jerry Brown/Joe Biden). Oversaw a senate rife with millionaires, while failing to support a bill that would have given blacks voting rights in the south. Because of it, at the 1892 convention, he was unceremoniously dumped from the ticket, although two years later was elected governor of NY. At the end of his term, he retired from politics and returned to his banking career, organizing the Morton Trust Co., which later merged with J.P. Morgan (Michael Milken), much to his regret. By the time of his death on his 96th birthday, he was already a forgotten name, despite his long public career. Inner: Gracious, and a good listener, with a pleasant personality. Urbane, generous and generally well-liked. Horatio Alger lifetime of rising to considerable wealth on his own initiative, as well as some political prominence, which would make him focus on the latter in his next rag-to-riches go-round in this series.


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PATHWAY OF THE POLITICIAN AS FINANCIAL MR. FIX-IT:
Storyline: The chameleonic capitalist shares a crypto-past with the Obamas, while serving as a highly competent mender of mega-economies, despite a vagueness of character bordering on the unknowable.

Mitt Romney (Willard Mitt Romney) (1947) - American politician and businessman. Outer: Of British and Scotch descent, with some German and a touch of French. Father was George Romney, chairman of American Motor Company, cabinet member and Michigan governor, who ran for president in 1968, before being undone by stating he had been brainwashed by the military over supporting America’s presence in Vietnam. Youngest of 4, with two sisters and one brother. Middle-named after a cousin who played for the Chicago Bears in the 1920s, choosing to be called by it in kindergarten. Had a privileged upbringing as the handsome scion of a an equally telegenic father, whom he worshipped. Raised in a devout Mormon household, he went to an elite all-boy’s private school where he was the only Mormon, before attending Stanford Univ. for a year. As a schoolboy, he showed himself to be a bully and prankster, with a sadistic streak he would later deliberately repress. While doing his obligatory two years plus of Mormon missionary work in France, and later at Brigham Young Univ., where he was valedictorian of the class of 1971, he found both his faith and ambition redoubled, in reaction to student excess both in the U.S. and France. Over 6’, and strong-jawed, with remarkably white teeth. While an undergraduate, in 1969 he married Ann Davies, whom he knew from high school, 5 sons from the extremely close union, as well as one who was still-born. His wife would come down with multiple sclerosis, but would use a variety of alternative methods to do battle with it. Relocated to Boston, and received an MBA from Harvard Business School, graduating in the top 5% of his class, before obtaining a law degree from Harvard Law School. Went to work for a management-consulting firm afterwards, and in 1978 he moved over to Bain & Co. Tapped by its president in 1984, to form Bain Capital, a venture capital offshoot that made him a multimillionaire, thanks to his facility for information-gathering. In 1990, he was asked back to the parent company, which was floundering, and he steered it back to health by buying up companies and laying off workers. Decided to enter politics in 1994 via a Republican senatorial run against Ted Kennedy in Massachusetts, and campaigned as a liberal financial fixer for the troubled, albeit highly liberal state. Although he initially gave the long-standing senator a run for his money, mudslinging by his opponent eventually overwhelmed him and he lost. Returned to Bain Capital afterwards, then came to national prominence in 1999, when he took over the scandal-ridden 2002 winter Olympics in South Lake City, and turned it into a personal triumph, replete with a draconian security apparatus, and a no-nonsense financial structure, thanks to loads of government money shoveled his way. Destroyed as many interoffice records as he could, so as to keep his measures largely untraceable, while continuing his connection to Bain, despite offcially having retired in 1999. Employed his newfound public persona for a successful run for governor of Massachusetts in 2002 as a moderate. Turned the state’s deficit into a surplus within two years, thanks to a focus on corporations rather than individual wealth, while placing 47th among the 50 states in job creation, through his top-down approach. During his stewardship, gay marriage was legalized in Massachusetts, against which he took a strong stand. A conservative businessman at heart, most of his other positions were initially geared towards his liberal constituency, causing him to do a number of about-faces when he decided to become a national candidate for the presidency in 2008, after carefully studying his father’s mistakes so as not to repeat them. Once again he destroyed as much of his interoffice record trail as he could, and thanks to his liberal use of his money, he became one of the early favorites, while ironically, he would one of the few Republicans in the primaries with only one marriage. Seen as the Stepford Candidate by some for his clean-cut image and bland pronouncements. Had difficulty in winning over conservative evangelicals because of their longheld prejudices over Mormonism, as well as his waffling on abortion, before coming out as pro-life. Claimed to be a lifelong hunter, then revealed he had hunted varmints once, while belatedly joining the NRA. Able to win support through a deliberate vagueness around specifics of his positions, then went on to spend more and more of his own money each quarter of the campaign season. At year’s end he gave a speech about his faith, being careful to employ the word ‘Mormon’ only once, while promising he would not be beholden to his church, despite propounding faith and belief in God as inseparable from being an American. Subsequently became the first Mass. politico not to win New Hampshire in the primaries, and went on to lose the nomination to John McCain. Endorsed him afterwards, despite considerable rancor twixt the two, while he retreated to lick his wounds. Declared once again for the presidency in 2011, as a frontrunner in a charisma-challenged field, while trying to appeal to a far more divided party whose more outrageous elements continually upstaged his efforts at capturing the public imagination. A series of his opponents rose to the forefront as alternatives to him, although all of them serially fell, as he remained the frontrunner, with the most financial backing and establishment endorsements, despite a general lack of enthusiasm surrounding his candidacy. After early strong showings, he was soundly defeated by Newt Gingrich in South Carolina, a traditional bellwhether of who wins the nomination ever since 1980, suddenly turning the campaign into a two man race. Spent $15 million to buy the subsequent Florida primary, burying Newt Gingrich in negativity, while successfully ducking the muck tossed his way. Revealed he only paid a 14% tax rate, and also gives the same percentage in tithes to his church, while stashing money in Switzerland and the Cayman Islands, as a pseudo-populist plutocrat on his way to buying the Republican nomination. Suddenly hit a snag, however, with Rick Santorum taking the next three, in a further rejection of him by the evangelical right, opening up the race again. Bounced back winning the CPAC straw poll, as well as the next caucus in Maine, athough charges of foul play and vote-rigging would accompany both victories, as Santorum continued to stay with him in the polls. By egregiously outspending his opponents, he managed to win a majority of primaries through March, save for the deep South, as well as numerous endorsements, virtually assuring his nomination despite an ongoing lack of voter enthusiasm for his etch-a-sketch candidacy, thanks to his backtracking on virtually everything he said. His primary primary opponents serially dropped out, finally giving him clear title to the nomination, several months ahead of the convention, with a huge war chest sponsored by billionaire polluters, war profiteers and anti-regulators. Given a viable issue via the upholding of Obamacare by the Supreme Court, he would continue waffling on everything else, while remaining a viable candidate via projections on his ability to turn a moribund economy around through his ongoing top-down philosophy of keeping the rich well-fed, and letting everyone else feed off the slops that trickle out of their trough. Weakened himself through a refusal to divulge his tax returns, while proving consistent in only one realm, continually sticking his foot in his mouth, whether it be on foreign or domestic policy. Chose Paul Ryan, an archconservative Wisconsin Congressman, as his running mate in somewhat of a surprise, as a placatory gesture to the Republican right, that did little to expand the appeal of his ticket, because of the former’s reactionary stands on a host of issues. Gave an acceptable acceptance speech at the Republican National Convention, filled with the illusion of compassion and caring, to an audience who ordinarily could care less about anyone but their fellow reflections in the funhouse mirror of American economic divisions. The three day infomercial would have no effect on the electorate at large, wasting a much-needed opportunity to give the country the sense of hope and change needed for a Romney victory. His subsequent tone-deaf sense of the electorate would make his quest almost an impossibility by mid-September.particularly after characterizing 47% of Americans as grifters and self-styled victims living off the generous teat of government. Dominated the first presidential debate through a combination of aggressiveness and playing fast fast-and-loose with the facts, without being challenged by the president, which quickly translated into a large bump in the polls. Continued to hold his own in the second, although was less effective in the third, while enjoying an extraordinary comeback in the direct lead-up to the election. Despite the illusion of a close race, however, his constant fabricating finally caught up to him and he was handily defeated in both the electoral college with a 303-206 drubbing, and in the popular vote as well, much to the shock of his rightwing support who had predicted en masse a landslide for him. Stunned and sour over his loss, blaming it on the 47% of grifters looking for governmental handouts, while totally ignoring his own empty suit uninspiring candidacy. After remaining in the background, he suddenly began making candidate noise again in early 2015, presenting himself as the anti-poverty choice, among the as-yet undeclared field for 2016, before telling his supporters he would not run, saying it was time for a new generation to represent the Republicans. Did a charity two round bout afterwards with former champion Evander Holyfield, showing off his trim physique. Barely any punches were thrown, although the event raised 1 million for Charity Vision, which helps restore vision to people in developing countries. After much earlier praising Donald Trump for his entrepreneurship, tore into him in 2016 as a blight on the Republican Party and a phony and a fraud, and not worthy of being its standard-bearer. The latter struck back by seemingly having him under consideration for Secretary of State, only to withdraw the honor as a means of humiliating him. Has a net worth of $250 million. Inner: Astute businessman, genuinely religious, and extremely strong family man, with an All-American aura of success about himself. Turnaround artist, awkward sense of humor, as well as a hypercompetitive perfectionist. Seemingly without any core center convictions, allowing him to sidestep any real positions. Awkward and largely compassionless, with no feel whatsoever for those less privileged than he. Highly disciplined, often getting into trouble when he strays from his scripts. Unable to make any sense of personal connection, despite an illusionary desire to present himself as ‘jes’ folks.’ Leapfrog lifetime of trying to take his sense of religiosity, leadership and financial acumen as far and high as he can, as a country club Republican eager to be seen as someone else entirely than who he really is. William Gibbs McAdoo (1863-1941) - American politician and cabinet official. Outer: Of Scots-Irish descent, in a soldierly family on his father’s side. Of Welsh descent on his maternal side. Mother, Mary Faith Floyd, was a writer, father of the same name was a lawyer. Fourth of seven children, in a family of second marriages for both parents. Born into poverty during the Civil War, he went to rural schools, until his sire became a professor at the Univ. of Tenn. Graduated from the same institution, before being made a deputy clerk of the U.S. District Court in 1882. In 1885, he wed Sarah Hazelhurst Fleming (Ann Romney), the same year he was admitted to the Tennessee bar. Seven children from the union, including four daughters and three sons. Took over the Knoxville Street Railroad System and electrified it, but the company went bankrupt in the process. Moved to NYC afterwards, and with a partner, sold investment securities. Three years later, in 1895, he returned to Knoxville to regain control over several of the company’s routes, only to run afoul of an Ohio businessman, who also coveted it, ultimately leading to suits, countersuits, a riot and arrests, before he gave up on the venture entirely. Returned to NY and became president of the railroad company that successfully completed a tunnel under the Hudson River between Manhattan and N.J., while doing battle against entrenched railroad and political interests. Lost his wife in 1912 when she took an overdose of pain medication for rheumatoid arthritis in what may have been a suicide, and at the same time became vice chairman of the Democratic National Committee, while working for the successful presidential campaign of Woodrow Wilson (Michael Eric Dyson). Became his Secretary of the Treasury, and, in 1914, wed his younger daughter, Eleanor (Sasha Obama), who was half his age, in a union that would produce two daughters and end in divorce twenty years later. Although he offered to resign, Wilson wanted him to help turn the recently established Federal Reserve System into the country’s central bank, which he did. Had to deal with the possibility of European countries liquidating U.S. securities and then converting U.S. currency into gold, which would have depressed the American economy and made the country prey to vulture wartime capitalism. Boldly kept the dollar on the gold standard, and closed the NY Stock Exchange for four months in 1914, successfully averting the potential economic crisis, and laying the groundwork for the U.S. to become the world’s number one creditor nation by the end of the war. Issued oversubscribed “Liberty Bonds,” to finance the subsequent U.S. participation in the war, raising some $17 billion by martial contest’s end, while also establishing the Inter-Allied Purchasing Commission which was responsible for procuring wartime supplies. In 1917, he was appointed Director General of Railroads, after the U.S. Railroad Administration was formed in order to coordinate the country’s railroad system around ferrying wartime supplies to and from the American expeditionary Force. Exhausted by all he was asked to do, he resigned his posts at the end of WW I, and formed a high profile law firm, while making the first of two presidential attempts in 1920, under the catchy slogan, “McAdoo’ll do.” As a “dry” supporter of Prohibition, he failed to gain the Democratic nomination, and in 1922, moved out to California, before trying again in 1924, only to fail to do so once more, despite leading on 100 of the 103 ballots, while picking up the endorsement of the Ku Klux Klan, which he did not disavow. Saved the presidential nomination for FDR in 1932, with his convention speech. Elected to the Senate the following year for one term, before being defeated in 1938, while strongly supporting the New Deal. After divorcing his second wife, he married Doris Isabel Cross, a 26 year old nurse in 1935, who was 45 years his junior at the time. Became chairman of the board of a steamship line, before suffering a fatal heart attack while traveling in Washington, D.C. while on a business trip. Buried in Arlington National Cemetery. Inner: Pragmatic, progressive, highly competitive, and willing to take chances. Equally admired, respected and reviled for his bold moves, while some saw him as completely unprincipled and facile with no real core beliefs. Very strong work ethic, identifying with Horatio Alger (Truman Capote) heroes. Horatio Alger lifetime of once again bringing his financial acumen to bear, while finding his ultimate desire, the presidency, just out of reach, necessitating another run, albeit as a much shiftier character in a far more polarized nation. Alexander Dallas (Alexander James Dallas) (1759-1817) - American cabinet official. Outer: Father was a physician of Scots descent. At the age of five, his family moved to Edinburgh, where he attended Edinburgh Univ,. although did not graduate. While in London he became friends with Benjamin Franklin (R. Buckminster Fuller), whose daughter’s son would marry his own future daughter. In 1780, he wed Arabella Maria Smith, the daughter of a British army officer, and returned to the West Indies, where he was admitted to the bar, thanks to his father’s pull. Two sons and a daughter from the union, including George Mifflin Dallas, who became vice-president under James Polk (Robert Dole). Three years later, because of his wife’s health, he moved to Philadelphia. Worked in a law office, before gaining his citizenship, and in 1783, was admitted to the Pennsylvania bar, although he failed to drum up much business through his practice. Served as the first reporter of the U.S. Supreme Court, using his own funds, although proved to be somewhat sloppy and extremely slow in his record-keeping. Appointed Secretary of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in 1791, and was reappointed three more times, while becoming a trustee of the Univ. of Pennsylvania. Helped found a variety of societies promoting egalitarian and anti-aristocratic politics during the decade, and also served as an aide-de-camp and paymaster for federal forces during the Whiskey Rebellion of 1794. In 1801, he was commissioned U.S. District Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, holding that post for thirteen years and arguing a host of landmark cases. Helped his friend Albert Gallatin (Al Gore), the Secretary of the Treasury in the cabinet of James Madison (Michael Eric Dyson), raise funds to fight the British during the War of 1812, then succeeded him in 1814. Faced with a virtually bankrupt government, he completely reorganized the Treasury Dept., and wound up creating a surplus by raising taxes, while pushing for the creation of the Second Bank of the U.S. Controlled the circulation of money, putting the nation back on the specie system. Served as acting Secretary of War and State during 1815, in addition to his other duties, while providing an economic balm for the country. Following his stint in the cabinet, he returned to his Philadelphia law practice. While arguing a case, he was seized by a stomach gout, and died three hours later. Inner: Highly competent in money matters, with a genuine feel for macroeconomics. You can bank on it lifetime of employing his financial acumen in service of his country at a time of its greatest need, before serially returning to try to realize his even greater ambition of sitting at the desk that says the buck stops here.

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PATHWAY OF THE POLITICIAN AS ETHNIC EVERYMAN:
Storyline: The ambitious administrator knows how to carve out unique careers for himself, thanks to a garrulous can-do nature, and a desire to continually top himself, or at least see how high his high energy talent for uncommon commonality can take him.

Bill Richardson (William Blaine Richardson III) (1947) - American politician. Outer: Mother was a native of Mexico, while his father of the same name was an investment banker, and also the product of a Mexican mother and American father. One younger sister. Spent his childhood in Mexico City, where his sire worked as an executive for Citibank, and became fluent in Spanish. Attended a New England prep school where he was a star pitcher with dreams of a major league career. Drafted by the Kansas City Athletics, but his progenitor convinced him to go to law school instead, and he popped his elbow soon afterwards, underlying the decision. 6’2”. Went to Tufts, where he majored in French and political science, than got his MA from his alma mater’s School of Law and Diplomacy. In 1972, he married Barbara Flavin, an antique’s restorer he had known from high school, no children from the union. Moved to Washington, DC, and worked in the State Dept’s congressional relation’s office, then joined the staff of the Foreign Relation’s Committee. In 1978, he moved to New Mexico, to launch his political career in a sparsely populated state, where his ethnic background would put him in good stead. Ran for Congress in 1980, against the longtime incumbent Manuel Lujan, Jr., and in the process made the Guiness Book of Records by shaking 8,871 hands in one day. Accused of carpetbagging, but the sheer overwhelming sense of presence he projected, made it a surprising close race, and he lost by only 5000 votes. Subsequently a new voting district was created, and he handily won it in 1981, despite some negative publicity along the way. Showed himself to be readily available to his constituents, visiting his district often, and became a very popular figure in the state, thanks to a combination of caring and conviviality. In the process, he also rose to become one of the House’s 4 chief Democratic whips, while focusing on Amerindian affairs in his 14 years there. In the 1990s, he began taking on unofficial personal diplomacy roles, insinuating himself into volatile overseas circumstances in Myanmar, Haiti, Iraq and Cuba, while garnering a good deal of publicity in doing so. Helped Pres. Bill Clinton get NAFTA passed in 1993, and then became his ambassador to the UN in 1997, before joining his cabinet the follow year as Secretary of Energy, although some chicanery at the Los Alamos labs undercut his reputation as such. Despite rumors of extra-marital affairs, they would remain unfounded, rather than proven. Taught at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Govt., and also became a corporate board member of several large energy companies. Successfully ran for governor of New Mexico in 2002, easily winning two terms, while showing himself to be a good fiscal manager of state finances. Won with an overwhelming 68% of the vote for his second term in 2006, before setting his sights on the presidency, announcing his candidacy in the beginning of 2007. Remained mired low in the polls, however, behind the three top front-runners, in a possible bid to become someone’s vice-presidential candidate. Hampered by non-recognition of his Hispanic status by much of the Latino population, thanks to his Anglo last name, and also a gaffe-prone campaign, where his off-the-cuff strength proved to be his weakness in debates and on the trail, although his innate diplomacy set him up for a possible position in a Democratic administration after he was forced to drop out following the initial primaries because of a lack of money and a continued 4th place status. Grew a beard afterwards, as a means of declaring his independence from the carefully programmed mien to which he had been forced to adhere, and then surprisingly gave his endorsement to Barack Obama, despite longterm Clinton ties, after undue pressure was put on him by the latter, angering him greatly. Later shaved off his beard, and accepted a cabinet position with Obama as Secretary of Commerce, when he had really wanted State. Before he could claim it, however, he was forced to withdraw because of a grand jury investigation into a California company’s political contributions to him and a subsequent extremely lucrative state contract awarded them. Subsequently regrew his goatee in recompense. Inner: Informal, tousled, with a tendency to put on weight. Twice broke the world’s record for most handshakes in an 8 hour period, a record of which he is extrremely proud. Garrulous and gregarious, a natural public performer who loves to be in the spotlight. High energy lifetime of riding his roots for all they are worth to try to become an important and unprecedented national figure from them. Fiorello La Guardia (Fiorello Enrico La Guardia) (1882-1947) - American politician. Known as the “Little Flower.” Outer: Father was a lapsed Catholic and a musician from Italy. Mother, who was Jewish, was a merchant’s daughter from Trieste, Austria. Eldest son and 2nd of 3 children. Both parents had emigrated to the U.S. two years prior to his birth. Raised an Episcopalian on western and southwestern army posts where his sire, replete with a showy waxed mustache, was an enlisted bandmaster from 1885 to 1898. The latter beat his son regularly in his desire to turn him into a facsimile of himself, and also encouraged his teacher’s to do the same, which wound up making him extremely sensitive to victims. It also motivated him to be the best he could be, while giving him a deep suspicion of authority, as well as everybody else. Had an admiration for swift frontier-style justice, and his view of corrupt Indian agents made him a fierce stickler for the law. On his sire’s discharge, the family went to Trieste, and he spent his late teens in the Austro-Hungarian empire, where he became a member of the American consular service in Budapest and then Fiume. Just over 5’ feet tall, and progressively wider as he grew older, although quite sensitive about his size. Returned to NYC 21 years after he had left, fluent in Hungarian, German, Serbo-Croatian, Yiddish and Italian, as well as English. Changed his middle name from Enrico to Henry, while keeping his Italianate first name, in a half-show of Americanization. While working as an interpreter at Ellis Island, he put himself through NYC law school by taking night classes, and in 1910 began practicing law in NY’s teeming ethnic enclave, the Lower East Side. Became a Progressive Republican because the Democratic Tammany machine in NYC was so deeply entrenched with Irish. Won his first seat in Congress in 1916 by just 357 votes, thanks to luring flophouse voters to the polls with donuts and coffee, before his opponents could. Volunteered for the Army’s aviation section in WW I, and was stationed in Foggia, Italy. Worked undercover, did propaganda and flew fighter planes, winding up a major, after returning from one mission with 200 bulletholes in his aircraft. In 1919, he married Thea Almerigotti, a Catholic native of Trieste, although both she and their infant daughter died the following year of TB. Threw himself single-mindedly into politics to deal with the loss, as a progressive, from the poor district of East Harlem. Married a 2nd time in 1929 to Marie Fischer, his Lutheran secretary of 15 years, who was a native New Yorker. The duo later adopted a son and a daughter. Other than a love of music, he had no hobbies, putting his total focus on his career. Had few friends as well, thanks to a natural competitiveness, which thinned out their ranks even more over the years, particularly with his penchant for abusing subordinates, when they failed to meet his standards. Spent a dozen years fighting for reform in a host of arenas in Congress, and in 1929, he ran for mayor as a Republican against the popular Tammany incumbent, Jimmy Walker (Harvey Fierstein), who easily beat him by a half million votes, thanks to the corrupt machine behind him. The Depression, however, would mute NYC’s love affair with Walker, and by 1932, he was forced to step down, opening the way for his own three term run for that office, beginning in 1934. Proved extremely dynamic, clearing slums, building public housing, creating a nonpolitical civil service and cleaning the city of its graft, while bringing it out of its corrupt and dysfunctional past. A strong moralist, he battled gangsters, gamblers and smut, and later trumpeted himself on radio with a weekly show. In one of his best-remembered ploys, he read the Sunday comics aloud during a newspaper strike, which further endeared him to the city. By his third term in 1941, he no longer wanted to be mayor, despite being one of the most popular NYC ever had. Wished to be Secretary of War in Pres. Franklin Roosevelt’s wartime cabinet, although he was denied the opportunity and made director of the Office of Civil Defense, a lesser role from which he was quickly forced out because of his contentiousness. Refused to run for a fourth term, but was unwilling and unable to retire. Left city hall looking old and worn out, and served quite unhappily and unsuccessfully as Director General of the UN Relief and Rehabilitation board, only to be stymied in what he wished to do, forcing him to resign. Because of his nonpartisan approach, no party leader succeeded him, nor did any reform machine continue after him. Died at home of cancer of the pancreas, with a mortgage still left on his home, and only $8000 in war bonds in the bank. Inner: Hard working and scrupulously honest, with a far greater interest in power than money. A highly colorful figure, he loved smashing slot machines and chasing after fire engines. Also not adverse to bullying and publicly dressing down subordinates. Flowering lifetime of searching for power in all the right places, only to be ultimately stymied by an ambition that far outweighed his potential possibilities. Charles E. Dudley (1780-1841) - English/American politician and businessman. Outer: Father had been a king’s collector of customs, who operated out of Newport, Rhode Island, before returning to England, where his son was born. Mother was from an American colonial family. After his sire’s death in 1790, mother and son emigrated to her native Rhode Island, where he was schooled. Became a clerk in a counting room, before entering trade, moving to the East Indies, then NYC, and finally settling in Albany, as a prominent merchant. Married Blandina Bleecker, a member of a prominent family. Having made his fortune, he entered politics, and became a member of the state senate in the early 1820s, while at the same time, was chosen as mayor of Albany from 1821 to 1824 and 1828 to 1829. Became a member of the Albany Regency, the powerhouse political machine of the state at the time, and remained an important liaison with its head, Martin Van Buren (FDR), who was serving in Washington. Failed in a bid for the House of Representatives, but, in 1829, he was sent to the U.S. Senate to fill in the vacancy left by Van Buren, when he became NY governor, and served until 1833. Proved a loyalist to the Andrew Jackson (Joschka Fischer) administration, but left no personal mark on the office. Retired from public life afterwards, although maintained his interest in politics. Had a longtime fascination with astronomy, and after his death, his wife established the Dudley Observatory in Albany in his memory. Inner: Affable, adept at personal politicking and a figure of integrity. Steppingstone lifetime of transliterating his personal people-to-people skills into the American political arena as a neophyte building on his innate office-holding skills.

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PATHWAY OF THE POLITICIAN AS PARTNERED PRESIDENTIAL HOPEFUL:
Storyline: The emulous attorney switches genders with her longtime mate, only to be ultimately betrayed in their mutual ambition for the presidency, while she struggled once again with a tumorous interior, rife with anger from lives, losses and frustrations both past and present.

Elizabeth Edwards (Mary Elizabeth Anania) (1949-2010) - American lawyer and political helpmate. Outer: Of Italian descent on the paternal side of her family. Father was a U.S. Navy pilot, mother was the daughter of a Navy pilot, and had been married beforehand to yet another Navy pilot who had been lost at sea. Moved often and spent part of her childhood going to school in Japan, where her sire, who taught her how to draw people to her, was stationed. Went to Mary Washington College, then transferred to the Univ. of North Carolina, where she completed 3 years of doctoral work in English, before getting her law degree there. Met her future husband John Edwards at the same time, and they were married in 1977. Began her career as a law clerk for a federal judge, before moving to Nashville, where she became an associate at a law firm. In 1981, she and her family moved to Raleigh, NC to continue her legal work. Had a son and a daughter, with the former killed in 1996, when his jeep overturned. Retired from practice to absorb the shock, spending weeks reading his textbooks aloud at his grave, and joining online bereavement groups, while reverting to her married name, after working professionally under her birth name. Decided to have more children afterwards, and she and her husband added a daughter and a son to their brood, while he entered politics, winning a senatorial seat in 1998 as a Democrat. In remembrance of her lost son, she spent much of her time devoted to administrating the Wade Edwards Foundation, which prods young people towards excellence. Taught legal writing as an adjunct instructor at her alma mater’s law school, while also working as a substitute teacher. When John Edwards first ran for the presidency in 2004 as a Democrat, she actively joined him in his campaign, exerting dominance and control over all his decisions, and dismissing any and all she felt failed their larger ambitions, while showing a far more driven side of herself privately than publicly. The day his ticket of Kerry-Edwards was defeated in the general election, she discovered she had breast cancer,. After being treated for it, she became an activist for cancer and women’s health issues, and wrote a memoir, “Saving Graces: Finding Solace and Strength from Friends and Strangers” in 2006, on how she dealt with her son’s death. Joined her husband on the campaign trail in 2007 once again, only to find the cancer had returned, and was now incurable, although treatable. To add insult to her metastasizing injury, her husband began an affair with a predatory video producer, which resulted in a baby, and the summary end of his political career when the revelations became public knowledge in 2008. Knew about it as early as 2006, at which point she literally became sick over it, although swallowed her pride for their mutual ambition. Penned “Resilience,” in response to her pain and betrayal, and then did numerous high profile TV appearances, in an odd post-mortem need to continue to air the dirty laundry of their public life, in what some labeled an opportunistic need for vengeance, and others as her ongoing role as a voice for voiceless victims. Legally separated from him afterwards, and bought a colonial home hoping to move into it with her children, although never did. The cancer, however, spread throughout her body, and she eventually stopped doing chemotherapy, dying soon afterwards, surrounded by family, including her estranged husband, while receiving almost universal praise for her true grit in the face of adversity. Inner: Formidable, with a considerable amount of fortitude. Great believer in connectedness as a means of triumphing over tragedies. Easily proved the dominant figure in her marriage in private, with a driving ambition that more than matched her husband’s. Resilient lifetime of having to deal with tragedy and tribulation as a highly public figure, through both personal connection and disconnection, in her ongoing desire to be a voice for equality and opportunity, and her unconscious need to be a victim of fate’s continuous unkind cuts. Charles McNary (1874-1944) - American politician and lawyer. Outer: Parents were farmers. 9th of 10 children, and 3rd son. His grandparents had previously crossed the country from Kentucky and Missouri respectively, making the family prime pioneer stock. Father was a former brickyard worker and schoolteacher. When he was 4, his mother died, and at 9, his sire passed away, at which point he moved off the family farm to live with an older brother and two older sisters in Salem, Oregon. Attended Salem public schools, and entered politics at 18, as country deputy recorder, holding the position for 4 years. A talented baseball player, some thought he should turn professional after school. At 22, he came to California to attend Stanford Univ., where he studied law, and worked as a waiter to get through school. Returned to Oregon the following year, and read law under an older brother, John, per his request, before passing the state bar in 1898, and practicing with his sibling, with real estate as his specialty. Their practice was successful enough for him to be able to buy back the old family farm. In 1902, he married Jessie Breyman (John Edwards), the daughter of a successful Salem businessman. No children from the union, which ended tragically when his wife died in an automobile accident in 1918. Managed his brother’s successful run for county district attorney in 1904, and then served under him as a deputy district attorney for 7 years. In addition, in 1908 he took on the position of dean of Willamette University College of Law, serving until 1913. That year, he was appointed to the Oregon Supreme Court, but two years later, he missed by one vote in securing the nomination as the Republican’s candidate for a full six year term, as a member of the party’s Progressive wing. Held numerous offices and positions, and in 1917, he was appointed to fill a vacancy in the U.S. Senate when his predecessor died. Lost the election the following year for a full term, only to see his winning opponent resign almost immediately afterwards. Took office at year’s end, and was subsequently reelected 4 more times, becoming, in essence, Senator-for-life from Oregon, with little opposition save in the election of 1936, when the Democrats were riding high. Seldom campaigned in person, letting surrogates do so for him, while his flexibility made him a party leader. In 1923, he married his secretary, Cornelia Woodburn Morton. No children from the union, although they eventually adopted a daughter. Built a lavish estate on his farm, which included an arboretum and tennis court, as well as 110 acres of fruit and nut trees. An experimental horticulturist, he established the filbert industry in the Northwest, while earlier forming the Salem Fruit Union, and serving as its president for the last 35 years of his life. Supported the development of hydroelectric power in the West, as well as farm and reclamation legislation. Always willing to compromise in the name of pragmatism, he also supported many of Pres. Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal programs, such as Social Security and the Tennessee Valley Authority. Rose to Senate Minority Leader his last 11 years, and played a pivotal role in gaining government funding for the Bonneville Dam, while also expanding the size of the country’s forests, and providing much needed farm relief, for which he was deeply appreciated. In 1940, after campaigning for the presidency, and spearheading a “Stop Willkie” movement later in the campaign, he reluctantly accepted his party’s vice-presidential nomination under Wendell Willkie (Barack Obama), as a western counterbalance to the latter’s midwestern and eastern liberalism, despite being a progressive himself. The unmatched team wound up being crushed by Roosevelt by over a five-to-one margin in the electoral vote. Subsequently turned down an offer to join FDR’s cabinet. Suffered a brain tumor, and died of pneumonia after unsuccessful surgery for it, with Willkie following him in death a scant six months later, so that neither of them would have lived out their term of office, even if they had been elected, a first in American politics. Inner: Genial and progressive, as well as a reflection of western interests and political sensibilities. Committed conservationist, with a great love of trees. Strongly identified with the pioneer stock from which he came, and was known as a man of his word. The possessor of a wry sense of humor, he loved to sing and dance as a youth, and was imbued with a solid work ethic throughout his life. Premier Parliamentarian, with a great love of the Senate and its traditions. Populist lifetime of evincing a deep identification with both the land and the legislative body of the U.S. Senate, while serving as a well-loved figure of the West for his ongoing championing of the needs of common folk. John Bell (1797-1869) - American politician, lawyer and plantation owner. Outer: Parents were pioneer settlers of Tennessee. Born a few months after Tennessee became a state. Father was a farmer and blacksmith. Proved precocious as a youngster and graduated from Cumberland College in 1814 while still a teenage, then was admitted to the bar and began his law practice in Franklin, Tenn. Before he was 21, he was elected to the state legislature. Continued practicing law while moving to Nashville, before marrying Sally Dickinson. Following her premature death, he wed Jane Yeatman, a wealthy widow. Their daughter would eventually marry Confederate Congressman Edwin Augustus Keebles (John Edwards). In 1827, he began his political career in the U.S. House of Representatives, and in 1834 and 1835, served as Speaker of the House, defeating James K. Polk (Robert Dole) for the office. In his 14 years in the House, he was also on the Judiciary Committee. Originally a Jacksonian Democrat, he disagreed with Pres. Andrew Jackson’s (Joschka Fischer) bank policy and choice of Martin Van Buren (Franklin Roosevelt) as his successor, and joined the Whig Party. Briefly served as Secretary of War under William Henry Harrison (Dwight Eisenhower) and John Tyler (Robert Byrd), before resigning in protest over the latter’s vetoing of Whig bills. Opposed Polk’s successful presidential candidacy in 1844, denying him Tennessee, while growing wealthy through investments in both railroads and manufacturing. As a slave-owning plantation owner, he was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1847, serving until 1859. Only one of two Southerners, along with Sam Houston (Tom DeLay), to naysay the Kansas-Nebraska Act, which allowed settlers to vote on slavery in the new territories. Ran for the presidency in 1860 via the Constitutional Union Party, a short-lived southern pro-Union and anti-secession party. Carried three southern states and won 39 electoral votes in the his/storic election, which brought Abraham Lincoln to office. Continued to oppose secession until 1861 when rebels fired on Fort Sumter, and then supported Tennessee’s joining the Confederacy. Moved to the lower South when Union troops entered his home state, and retired from politics. Continued his business activities during the fray, although fared poorly because of the unsettled conditions. Returned home after the Civil War, deeply depressed over the South’s loss, and died there four years later, a thoroughly defeated man. Inner: Known as “the Great Apostate,” for his reluctance to embrace secession. Principled and highly emotional, with a very strong identification with his home state. Bellwether lifetime of enjoying privilege and power in both the political and commercial arenas until national divisions made him reluctantly embody a losing cause to the point of self-defeat and self-destruction, in his ongoing dramatic need to deal with multiple losses as a means of finding his/her own inner strength.

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PATHWAY OF THE POLITICIAN AS SELF-MADE MAN OF THE PEOPLE:
Storyline: The populist politician switches genders, while identifying with commonality, despite doing quite well for himself as its champion against corporate America, in his ongoing partnership of power with a remarkably parallel, but calamity-prone, mate.

John Edwards (Johnny Reid Edwards) (1953) - American lawyer and politician. Outer: Of British, Scottish, Irish, Welsh and German descent. Father worked as a textile mill floor worker, and eventually became a supervisor. Mother had a roadside antique business, and later became a letter carrier. His parents had to take out a $50 loan in order to pay the hospital bill for his delivery. Oldest of 3. A football star in high school, he lettered in 4 sports and became the first member of his family to go to college. After a scholarship to Clemson failed to materialize, he transferred to North Carolina State Univ., where he majored in textile technology, and graduated with honors. Received his law degree from the Univ. of North Carolina, graduating with honors from there as well. While at UNC he met fellow budding lawyer Elizabeth Anania, who was four years his senior. The duo were married in 1977. Two children from the union. Clerked for a federal judge, then went to work for a Nashville law firm, before moving to Raleigh in 1981. Built up a highly successful career as a personal injury attorney taking on big corporations for negligence and medical malpractice, and winning multimillion dollar awards, while gaining national attention for his efforts. Later published a book, “Four Trials,” which he co-wrote, recounting his victories. The couple’s oldest son, Wade, was killed in a Jeep accident in 1996, devastating them, and forcing them to refocus their lives. Another son and daughter would follow. His wife discontinued her law practice over the tragedy, while he decided to go into politics as a populist Democrat. The duo also started a foundation in their son’s name, dedicated to giving more educational opportunities to young people. Boyish and telegenic, with a ubiquitously ready smile for the cameras, he won a Senate seat in 1998, defeating the incumbent Republican on a populist campaign. During his one term, he voted to give authority to Pres. George W. Bush to invade Iraq, a stance he would eventually come to apologize for, as a huge mistake. Showed himself to be liberal on some issues, and conservative on others. Moved into a $6 million manse following his term, somewhat belying his projected commonality. After laying the groundwork for a presidential run in 2000, he actively sought the nomination in 2004, as the spokesman for the workingman half of what he characterized as the two Americas. Retired from his Senate seat and was selected as the vice-presidential candidate by the ultimate nominee, John Kerry, although the latter’s people were unhappy with the choice, in their desire for a far more aggressive attack dog. The two suffered a close defeat, marked by shenanigans in Ohio, which probably would have given them the election, had it been fair. Derided, as well, by the opposition as the Breck Boy, for his youthfulness, he, nevertheless, made a decent-enough impression as a seemingly honest pol and put his full focus afterwards on capturing the 2008 Democratic nomination. The same day he conceded, his wife revealed she had breast cancer, and became an activist for social awareness of that disease. After fighting it with chemotherapy, she discovered in 2007 it had spread and was incurable, although treatable. The realization did not untrack her husband’s pursuit of the presidency, and she remained an extremely active component of his team. Appointed director of a poverty and work center at the Univ. of North Carolina, he became a highly critical voice of the Bush administration’s policies, while presenting himself as a champion of the ordinary working American, despite his millionaire status and $400 haircuts. A genuine progressive, he built his campaign around fighting poverty and providing universal health care as his two key elements, while blaming the wealthy and corporate interests for America’s problems, which guaranteed him minimum media coverage. Despite his full-time campaigning schedule he remained third to the two favorites, Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama all through the pre-primaries campaign, thanks to their superior funding. Moved to Iowa, and continued to hold his number three position, as those behind him serially dropped out of the race, making it a three-way affair, until he, too, was forced to call it quits, without initially supporting either of the final two media-anointed frontrunners. Finally gave his endorsement to Barack Obama at the near-end of the primaries, when Hillary Clinton was all but counted out. Continually dogged throughout his run and afterwards by rumors of an affair and a love child with Riell Hunter, a documentarian who produced videos for his prepresidential campaign. Finally admitted to the affair but not the child, blaming narcissism and a sense of omnipotence on the lapse, which effectively ended his status as a national figure. The following year he would come under investigation for having his PAC pay $100,000 to Hunter’s production company, while his wife’s subsequent memoir and TV appearances would continue to rub his nose into his indiscretion, long after it was over. In 2010, he finally admitted paternity, having nothing more to lose by doing so, since he and his wife legally separated in preparation for divorce. Later proposed to Hunter, amidst possibilities of a grand jury indictment over misuse of campaign funds, allowing him to remain one of America’s most despised public figures. At his wife’s bedside when she died of cancer in 2010, although not allowed to speak at her subsequent funeral service. Indicted the following year for violations of campaign finance laws over nearly a million dollars spent on covering up his affair. Rejected a plea deal that would have given him some prison time, which opened him up to multiple felony charges. Asked to pay back $2.3 million to the government in matching campaign funds, afterwards, while revealing he has a serious heart condition. Brought to trial on various charges of campaign cash abuse in 2012, but managed to evade judgment, with one acquittal on six counts, and the others labeled the product of a mistrial, thanks to a lack of prosecutorial evidence. The government would subsequently drop all charges, but his heartless dishonesty would render him one of America’s most hated politicians forevermore. Subsequently ended his relationship with NH when she characterized his dead wife as “a witch on wheels,” during a TV interview. Inner: Until his scandal, seen as clean-cut, sincere, with a genuine desire to even the playingfield between rich and working-class America, despite a hidden sense of self-annihilation hiding just below his expensive blow-dried surface. Progressively more progressive populist lifetime of doing battle on a national level with the bought-and-paid-for politicians of the establishment, as a voice for the other America, before succumbing to his own grandiose sense of entitlement for doing so. Jessie McNary (Jessie Breyman) (?-1918) - American political helpmate. Outer: Father was a successful businessman. In 1902, she married Charles McNary (Elizabeth Edwards). No children from the union. Served as a helpmate for his initial foray into politics, up to the earliest part of his Senate career. While returning home from a trip, her car flipped over and she was crushed underneath. Inner: Curious parallel to her/his son’s demise in the next go-round in this series. Tragic lifetime of giving both love and loss to a figure who would continually have to deal with the combination of those opposites, in their ongoing struggles as a power couple trying to transcend their predilection for self-destroying epiphanies. Edwin Augustus Keebles (1807-1868) - American politician. Outer: A Virginia native, he moved to Tennessee, and wed the daughter of U.S. Representative John Bell (Elizabeth Edwards). Served as mayor of Murfreesboro from 1838 to 1855, then, at the outset of the Civil War, was elected to the Tennessee state legislature. Supported Tennessee’s secession from the union, and the subsequent Jefferson Davis (Lyndon Johnson) administration, as Union soldiers occupied his district. Served in the Second Confederate Congress the last year of the war, after initially losing a bid for the same seat in the First Confederate Congress. Died three years after the war. Inner: Footnote lifetime of continuing his longtime familial connection, while playing an extremely minor role in a major American conflict.

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PATHWAY OF THE POLITICIAN AS RECONSTITUTED TIRE KING:
Storyline: The outspoken ex-iindustrialist turns his attention to the larger political arena, while continuing to recognize that communications are the key to success in all fields. as he tries to rein in a short fuse and undisciplined bluntness ill-suited for public life, and focus on his candid sincerity.

John Kasich ((John Richard Kasich, Jr.) (1952) - American politician, talk show host and banker. Outer: Of Czech descent on his paternal side and Croatian on his mother’s. Had a blue collar upbringing. Father was a mailman, mother was a postal clerk. Oldest of three with a younger sister and brother. Parents were Democrats, with his mother eventually becoming a Republican as well as an Episcopelian, while his views were shaped by the Catholic Church. Dreamt initially of becoming a priest, and ultimately the pope. Went to Ohio State Univ. and studied political science. Joined the Ohio Legislative Services Commission on graduating in 1974, then worked directly for a state senator for three years before launching his own political career. During that time he wed Mary Lee Griffith, no children from the union, which ended in divorce in 1980. Served in the Ohio State Senate from 1979 to 1983, and then the U.S. House of Reps from 1983 to 2000, showing himself more than willing to confront his critics. Lost both his parents in 1987 to a drunk driver. Supported Bill Clinton’s crime bill of 1994, helping it pass, which put him at odds with gun owners and his base. In 1997, he wed Karen Waldbillig, a hospital communications consultant, two daughters from the union. Three years later, he made an unsuccessful bid for the presidency. From 2001 to 2007, he was the host of “Heartland with John Kasich,” on Fox news and also served as a frequent guest host on the network’s flagship nightly opinion show, “The O’Reilly Factor”, while contributing to other talk shows on the network. At the same time, her served as Managing Director of Lehman Brothers Investment banking division. In 2010, he was elected Republican governor of Ohio, thanks to a strong conservative base. Proved to be a popular moderate, supporting anti-abortion and anti-gay measures as well as pro-gun rights, although occasionally sided with Democrats on issues, then won the enmity of some of his base, when he announced he would expand Medicaid in the state using federal money. Proposed tax reforms that helped the highest tier and hurt the lowest as well as the middle-class since it made purchases more expensive. Despite a challenge from the right, he handily won re-election in 2014 by a 30 point margin, and the following year, he announced for the presidency again, as the second to last of 17 to seek the office on the Republican side. Showed himself well in the subsequent opening round of debates, and remains a good possibility to secure the nomination, as a clear choice of his party’s establishment, over the bombastic Donald Trump, the early favorite. Came in second in the February New Hampshire primary after putting all his energy into it, to solidify his number two position among the remaining six Republican hopefuls. Later won his home state of Ohio albeit because of Democratic crossovers. His singular primary victory was enough to fill him with optimism for an ultimate brokered convention, and resist calls to drop out. Nevertheless, ended his run shortly after Ted Cruz, leaving the field clear for Donald Trump to become the presumptive nominee. Author of a number of books, including “Courage Is Contagious: Ordinary People Doing Extraordinary Things to Change the Face of America.” His estimate net worth at the time of his candidacy was approximately $2.5m. In an unprecedented move. he refused to attend the Republican Convention in his home state of Ohio, because of profound policy differences with Donald Trump. Subsequently served as one of his strongest critics, intimating he would run against him in 2020 if he ran again. Has a net worth of $10 million. Inner: Foul tempered and blunt, albeit direct and honest about his own views even when they run counter to the Republican canon. Intense and unpolished, continually saying what he thinks, which makes some feel he is an arrogant jerk. Impolitic lifetime of rising from humble origins in order to give his confrontational character a better understanding of working-class existence, despite an inability to mute his impatience and innate arrogance to fit the illusionary mold of ordinary politics. Harvey Firestone (Harvey Samuel Firestone) (1868-1936) - American industrialist. Outer: Of French and German descent, with his ancestors having settling in Pennsylvania in the middle of the 18th century, and anglicizing their name from Feurstein. Born on his family’s prosperous farm, which had been built by his paternal grandfather. Second of three sons of his sire’s second marriage, with a short-lived older brother and sister from his first. After high school, he worked as a salesman for a buggy company, and came to see that rubber carriage tires would be far more comfortable than steel tires or wooden wheels. In 1895, he married Idabelle Smith, whose father held a patent for a flour milling process. 6 sons and adaughter from the union, with the first dying at the age of several days. A year later, along with two partners, he bought a building for $1000 that would become his manufacturing base. Shortly after, he met young Henry Ford, who was developing his first automobile, and sold him a set of rubber carriage tires. The two would form a close friendship, which would include Thomas Edison and the trio often vacationed together as fellow captains of industry. Forced to merge with a rival after losing a patent infringement suit, but ultimately sold his initial holding, which allowed him in 1900 to buy an old foundry building and incorporate the Firestone Tire & Rubber Co. in Akron, Ohio, with 17 employees. Akron was also the home of the Goodyear Tire Co., as well as B.F. Goodrich, making it a manufacturing center for vulcanized rubber. Began producing pneumatic tires in 1903 and within three years sold 2000 sets of detachable tires to Ford, the largest order of its kind at the time. By 1910, his profits exceeded $1 million, and the following year one of his automobiles entered and won the first Indianapolis 500. Joined the “Good Roads” movement, supporting the creation of the first coast-to-coast highway. Also developed tires for heavy trucks, and promoted the campaign to use them instead of rails. By 1926, his company was producing more than 10 million tires a year, which were sold in a nationwide chain of retail stores. Leased a million acre rubber plantation in Liberia in order to break free of the rubber market in Asia controlled by Britain and the Netherlands. Retired in 1932, with his namesake oldest surviving son taking over the company. Died in his sleep of a coronary thrombosis in his vacation mansion. Inner: Excellent business instincts, with a clear view of what would be needed in the dominant industry of the early 20th century. Had ruling class sensibilities, and was well-respected as a vertical integrator of the tire industry, who was willing to pay higher wages for more productivity. Where the rubber meets the road lifetime of recognizing what was needed to move beyond the horse and buggy era, and proving to be a dominant figure in the subsequent tire industry through dint of drive, ambition and strong focus.


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PATHWAY OF THE POLITICIAN AS ENTHUSIASTIC & ETHICAL ETHNIC:
Storyline: The populist progressive knows how to rise from modest and minority roots to claim his rightful place in the political pantheon of his times, in his ongoing desire to be an emblem of America as the ultimate land of opportunity for any and all of its varied citizens.

Antonio Villaraigosa (Antonio Villar, Jr.) (1953) - American politician. Outer: Of Mexican-American descent. Mother worked as a secretary, after his father abandoned the family when he was five. Close to the former, whose belief in him spurred him to rise above his humble barrio beginnings. Oldest of four siblings. Went to both Catholic and public schools, after being expelled from the former for fighting. Attended East Los Angeles College, before transferring to UCLA, where he majored in his/story. Went to an unaccredited law school, the People’s College of Law, although subsequently failed 4 times to pass the California Bar exam, so he never practiced as a lawyer. Instead he became an investigator and union steward for the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission from 1978 to 1986. Fathered two daughters out-of-wedlock, then, in 1985, he married Corina Raigosa, who would become a longtime teacher, and combined both their names into his, 4 children from union. An affair on his part would threaten to end the marriage in 1994, with his wife filing for divorce, although the two were able to reconcile, after a long separation. Served as a union organizer for the teacher’s union from 1987 to 1983. In 1994, he was elected to the California State Assembly as a Democrat, and thanks to his gregarious nature and innate political skills, he was made Assembly Speaker 4 years later. Established himself as a progressive, and in 2001 ran for mayor of Los Angeles, but lost to Jim Hahn, the son of longtime LA politico Kenneth Hahn. Won a seat on the City Council, and maintained his high profile in city affairs, so that he handily beat Hahn in 2005, becoming the first Latino mayor of Los Angeles since 1872. Immediately showed that he had both the dramatic sense to be a photogenic media darling with his all-star political lineup at his inauguration, and the ethical sense to stop corrupt practices with lobbyists and city hall with a written promise from everyone to be far more ethical. With boundless energy, and seemingly everywhere at once, he initially proved to be an extremely popular mayor, actively trying to untangle longheld city problems, in every province, from transportation to education to pothole protection to crime prevention. His desire to take control of the city’s Unified School District received much opposition from entrenched interests, causing him to compromise on that goal, while continuing the work with his predecessors’ models in maintaining standards in the school system. Stayed very focused on enhancing the city’s economy, while trying to create more affordable housing, and keeping crime rates and gang activity down, as well as maintaining environmental integrity as a supporter of “green urbanism,” including plans to plant one million new trees in the city. As a business emissary for LA, he traveled to Asia, and as an emissary for his own larger ambitions, has frequently appeared in the national media as a representative of Latino Power, with thoughts of the governorship, and even possibly the presidency very much on his future agenda. In 2007, however, he hit a roadblock, when his wife filed for divorce once again, ending their 20 year + marriage. Later admitted to an ongoing affair with Telemundo reporter, Mirthala Salinas, although the two soon terminated their relationship, because of the damage it had down to both their careers. The affair would end his press honeymoon, as further revelations would show most of his time was spent promoting himself, and continuously traveling out-of-town, and occasionally out-of-country, with far less of a focus on the city’s myriad problems, despite his claims of 16-18 hour days. Nevertheless, he easily won a second term in 2009, outspending his nearest rival by a 15-1 margin. Inner: Gregarious, self-aggrandizing, driven and highly ambitious, with seemingly boundless energy. Part two lifetime of coming in once again as part of a Catholic minority, and using his innate political acumen and his genuine like-ability to rise to prominence and possible pre-eminence as a representative of pure populist power. Al Smith (Alfred E. Smith) (1873-1944) - American politician. Outer: Grandparents were Irish, German, Italian and English, although he thoroughly identified with his Irish Catholic roots. Father of the same name was a Civil War veteran who owned a small trucking firm, and died when his son was 13. One younger sister. Dropped out of parochial school to help support the family, and never finished his education. 5'6". Worked at the Fulton Fish Market, which he considered his education, along with “the sidewalks of NY.” Began his political career in 1895 as a clerk, then as an investigator in the office of the city commission of jurors, while working his way up through ward politics. Although surrounded by corrupt machine politicos of Tammany Hall in his rise, he remained clean, and never forgot his humble origins, nor let anyone else discount them either. In 1900, he married his childhood love, Catherine Dunn, 5 children from union. Won his first elective office in 1903 as a Democrat to the NY State Assembly, and held that post until 1915, serving as Speaker for the last two years, thanks to his social skills. Always emphasized his immigrant beginnings, as a populist progressive, and remained untainted by the corrupt practices of his fellow politicians. As part of the commission that investigated the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in 1911, he instituted safety legislation to correct that tragedy, and the experience turned him into an enthusiastic social reformer. Rose through party ranks to become the leader of the progressive movement in the Democratic Party in both the city and the state, while mastering the ins and outs of state politics, as a protege of party boss Charles Murphy. Held the well-paying position of sheriff of NY county from 1915 to 1917, and became president of the City board of alderman. Won the governorship of NY state in 1918, then lost his re-election bid in 1920, before being elected three more times to the two year office, thanks to a facility for picking really good advisers. Learned how to use the media to his advantage, including newly introduced radio, despite his decidedly New York accent, which ‘woiked’ against him nationally, although not locally, and showed himself to be an active reformer, introducing much social welfare legislation, while reshaping the state’s governmental structure from the corruption and chaos he had found. His achievements made him a leading candidate for the 1924 Democratic presidential nomination, although his Catholicism and anti-prohibition stance caused him to be rejected by the convention. Reined in his progressivism and won the nomination in 1928, after being introduced as the “Happy Warrior,” only to lose to Herbert Hoover in the general election by an overwhelming margin, thanks to the deep-seated prejudices of the country at the time, which included naming him as the Anti-Christ by the Ku Klux Klan, the divisiveness of Prohibition, and a false optimism in an economy that was about to go bust. Even failed to win New York State, and was successful only in the South and Massachusetts and Rhode Island, all longheld Democratic bastions. Became more conservative once out of elective office, feeling beholden to his wealthy supporters. Nevertheless, was able to inaugurate a longlasting coalition of ethnics and urbanites that would be the base of the Democratic Party for the next five decades or so. Failed in a third bid for the nomination in 1932, and initially supported Franklin Delano Roosevelt (Gerhard Schroeder), who had succeeded him as his hand-picked choice for governor, although felt neglected and betrayed by him afterwards. Became president of the Empire State Building and also editor of the New Outlook, in the early 1930s, and refused to support FDR’s New Deal legislation. In 1934, he became one of the leaders of an anti-New Deal organization, and in 1936, 1940 and 1944 backed the Republican candidates for president against FDR, then played no public role in WW II. Following his wife’s death from cancer, he lost the will to live, and died 5 months later in a hospital. Inner: Honest and upright, with a genuine love for the political life. Genuine reformer, with a great desire to improve things, once he had learned the basics from the machine politicians who initially supported him. Happy Warrior lifetime of rising as high as he could in the political hierarchy of his times, before allowing a disgruntled sense of rejection temper his accomplishments, and mute his social sensibilities. William L. Marcy (1786-1857) - American politician and statesman. Outer: Mother’s side of the family came over with the Puritans. After graduating from Brown Univ., he taught school, then studied law, before being admitting to the bar in 1811. Married Cornelia Knower, the daughter of a member of the Albany Regency, in 1812, 3 children from the union, before his wife died in 1821. Began practicing law in Troy, NY, before serving in the War of 1812 as a minor officer. Became recorder of Troy, although lost his post through the manipulations of political opponents. Served as an editor of a local paper, and then was named adjutant-general of the NY militia in 1821, and was often referred to as Gen. Marcy afterwards. Became NY state comptroller in 1823, holding that post for the rest of the decade, and through that position, was a leading member of the Albany Regency, a group of Democrats who held considerable power in the state, including Charles Dudley (Bill Richardson) and Silas Wright (Julian Castro). Parlayed that position into becoming an associate justice of the NY State Supreme Court, before being elected to the U.S. Senate as a Jacksonian Democrat in 1831. Defended Secretary of State Martin Van Buren (Gerhard Schroeder) against an attack by Henry Clay (Hubert Humphrey) with the remark, “To the victor belongs the spoils of the enemy,” and became known afterwards as a champion of the corrupt spoils system. Resigned from the senate to win the governorship of NY State in 1833, holding that post for the rest of the decade, where he proved to be an effective administrator, thanks to a gifted secretary of state. Organized the first geographical survey of all 56 NY counties while in office. Ultimately defeated by William Seward (Howard Cosell). Remained active in NY state politics, and in 1845, he was appointed Secretary of War in the cabinet of James K. Polk (Robert Dole), remaining in that position throughout the latter’s term of office. Returned to his law practice afterwards, before seeking the presidential nomination in 1852. Failed in his attempt to secure the nomination, but was made Secretary of State to the eventual winner of the election, Franklin Pierce (Eugene McCarthy), where he negotiated the Gadsden Purchase, which drew the boundary line between Mexico and the United States, following war between the two countries. Also helped avoid war with Spain through his negotiations, and ultimately put together 24 treaties. Inner: Popular and friendly, and effective in all the offices he held. Largely a machine politician, learning the intricacies of getting things done via the American system. Prepatory lifetime of working through the establishment, before delving into minority and reformist status to get in touch with his inner populist in order to make a far deeper mark on his times, and try to actualize his higher ambitions.

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PATHWAY OF THE ENTREPRENEUR AS ARDENT SELF-SUBSCRIBER:
Storyline: The supremely confident CEO switches genders and focuses on pure power in both the business and political realms, after earlier showing him/herself to be both highly innovative as a brilliant beacon of the publishing trade.

Carly Fiorina (Cara Carlton Sneed) (1954) - American businesswoman and political aspirant. Outer: Of German, English ancestry, with a remote touch of Dutch and French. Father was a law school professor, dean and later a federal judge of the ninth circuit U.S. Court of Appeals. Mother was a portrait and abstract artist. Middle of three siblings, with an older sister and a younger brother. The family moved frequently because of her sire’s career. Went to five different high schools, including one in London and one in Ghana, and was raised an Episcopalian. Tall and slim with brown eyes and dyed brown/blonde hair. Received a B.A. in medieval his/story and philosophy at Stanford Univ, before attending UCLA Law School, only to drop out after a semester, at which point her father told her he didn’t think she would amount to much. Bounced around, working as a receptionist, teaching English in Italy, and finally becoming a sales rep at AT&T in her mid-20s. Married Stanford classmate Todd Bartiem in 1977, divorced seven years later. The following annum she wad Frank Fiorina, a former truck driver who became an AT&T executive, before taking early retirement. Two stepdaughters from the mutually supportive union, with one, Lori, dying at 35 in 2009. Eventually earned an MBA from the Univ. of Maryland and a Master of Science in management from MIT’s Sloan School of Management. Became a senior vice-president at AT&T of Lucent, and played a key role in its initial stock offering launching in 1996, Rewarded with senior management positions over the next several years, while Fortune magazine named her the most powerful woman in business. In 1999, Hewlett-Packard Company, a leading personal computer manufacturer, made her its CEO, with some saying she was far more interested in her own advancement than the company’s. With the bursting of the dot-com bubble, in 2001, she engineered a merger with Compaq, a leading competitor, and together they became the world’s largest personal computer manufacturer measured by units shipped, although they would subsequently be challenged for that status, while HP’s stock plummeted in value, and she wound up laying off 30,000 employees during her run at the top, shipping off jobs to China. Tripled her own salary at the same time, along with buying a yacht and five corporate jets. Resisted farming out her authority to division heads per HP’s board’s desire, and, as a result, she was forced to resign her position in 2005, which immediately caused the company’s stock to rise. Paid slightly more than $20 million in severance pay, while many sources viewed her stewardship in highly negative terms. Penned her autobiography, “Tough Choices” in 2006, which was well-received, and, curiously served as a model of sorts for Hillary Clinton’s later, “Hard Choices.” Named to several international and scholastic boards in the wake of her resignation, while she made sure her name was still bandied about in the media, including a run on Fox network as a business commentator as well as serving as economic adviser to John McCain in his failed 2008 presidential bid. Also formed Carly Fiorina Enterprises, a nonprofit dedicated to world economic growth. The next annum she was diagnosed with breast cancer and immediately underwent a double mastectomy, followed by chemotherapy, before being given an excellent prognosis for survival. In 2010, she ran for the U.S. Senate as a Republican against longtime liberal California Democrat Barbara Boxer and lost, despite accepting large contributions from the coal industry and the Koch Bros., and spending over $6 million of her own money, only to be soundly defeated by a 52.2% to 42.2% margin, and winding up with a campaign $600,000 in debt which has yet to be repaid. In May of 2015, she announced her candidacy for president on TV during an interview, and immediately began going after Hillary Clinton, claiming she was the real deal while the former Secretary of State was not. Conservative on social issues, with a desire to repeal affordable health care while opposing abortion, supporting traditional definitions of marriage, and questioning the data on climate change. Began with extremely low poll numbers, down in the 1 % range, and the added onus of her constituency’s innate prejudices against women in positions of power. Nevertheless, in the first round of debates, she dominated the second tier less-than-magnificent 7, assuring her rise to the first tier afterwards, as a viable potential vice-presidential candidate. Stood out once again during the 2nd debate with the main contenders. showing an aggressiveness, particularly against frontrunner Donald Trump, who had earlier criticized her looks. Exhibited a clear desire to be heard, despite a noticeable silence on women’s issues, and a misspoke warmongering view of military policy that would add billions to an already over-inflated budget. in spite of a proclivity for lying and exaggeration, she was able to draw considerable financial interest in conservative fundraising circles, in the pre-primary going, although eventually slipped in the polls with the rise of Dr. Ben Carson as the surprise favorite. By the New Hampshire primary in February, she was forced to call it quits, thanks to little overt support. Horrified at the thought of a Trump presidency, she subsequently endorsed Ted Cruz, who picked her as his v-p choice in a last ditch attempt to derail the front runner. Sang over her brief return to the spotlight, which would soon be to no avail, as Cruz dropped out of the race following his Indiana primary defeat. Remained active in Virgina politics afterwards, while considering a 2018 Senate run to unseat Tim Kaine. Has a net worth of almost $60 million. Inner: Supremely self-confident, feeling she can step into any situation and command it. Seen as continually putting her own interests first in whatever she does, with more than her share of critics. Hard-charing lifetime of switching genders in order to try to add political leadership to her c.v., despite much carping about her management skills. Cyrus H. K. Curtis (Cyrus Hermann Kotzschmar Curtis) (1850-1933) - American publisher and philanthropist. Outer: From a long line of New Englanders, whose fore bearers came to America in 1632. Father was a decorator as well as a musician, who imbued within his son a strong sense of honesty and integrity, as well as a love for music. The older of two, with a younger sister who died in her 30s. Grew up in modest circumstances in a small wooden house, and as a youth showed an entrepreneurial flare as a newsboy, opening up a new market for a local paper. At 13, he started a four page boys’ paper called “Young America,” only to lose his hand press in a fire. Dropped out of high school, and worked as a dry good clerk for six years, then, at 20, went back to his original local paper, which was given to him by its owner, because of its unprofitability. After five barren years, he gave it up and moved to Philadelphia, while marrying Louisa Knapp, one daughter from the union. Started another paper, “The Tribune,” which his wife helped transform into The Ladies’ Home Journal, in 1883, and, as such, it became the first magazine to reach one million in circulation by century’s turn. Organized his own eponymous Publishing Company in 1891, and when banks wouldn’t loan him money to expand, he went to N.W. Ayer, an ad agent, who bankrolled him for $250,000 as well as another $125,000 for a paper mill. Paid it back with a year and half, while the N.W. Ayer Co. became hugely successful as an advertising firm. In 1897, he bought a little weekly, The Saturday Evening Post, which had been founded in 1821, for $1000, only to initially lose $1.5 million on it, before it, too, took off, with circulation hitting one million within a decade. Lost his first wife in 1910, and the same year he wed a widow, Kate Stanwood Cutter Pillsbury, who brought her own two daughters to the union. Continued adding to his publishing stable, including the NY Post and the Philadelphia Inquirer, although his newspapers did less well, and he was forced to sell them at significant losses, thanks to poor management and dull content. At his height his periodicals raked in forty cents for every advertising dollar spent in the country. Used a simple formula, seeing the growing middle-class as his natural audience, while paying top dollar to contributing writers, attracting marquee names in the process. Also employed new technologies to become the first magazine publisher to have color illustrations. Because of advertising revenues, he was able to offer subscription prices below production costs. Did market research as well, which attracted advertisers by the droves, while he was very selective about what wares sold in his publications. Lived well, with a large estate in the Philadelphia suburbs, as well as several yachts, thanks to a love of the sea. Philanthropic, supporting the Philadelphia Symphony, among other institutions, thanks to a life-long love of music. Suffered from heart dis-ease, and ultimately died of it, after being stricken a year earlier on one of his yachts. At the same time he was recuperating, his second wife passed on in her sleep. Eventually his empire was superseded by TV, although that did not happen until decades after his death, and he remains a titan of early 20th century publishing, as one of the richest Americans ever. Inner: Simple, direct and generous. Left details alone, and used solitaire as a meditative means for solving problems. Innovative and imaginative in his various enterprises, while surrounding himself with very competent people. Totally non-political, and quite tuned into the latest technological developments in his sphere of influence. Deep pockets lifetime of allowing his inventive nature redefine the magazine industry, while targeting his products towards a middle-class audience staring to come into its own.


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PATHWAY OF THE POLITICIAN/JURIST AS PERENNIAL CHIEF JUSTICE:
Storyline: The brilliant benchwarmer maintains his fascination with America’s supreme court over the centuries, and remains continually drawn to it, in order to build on his pragmatic respect for the past and problem-solving view of the present, as well as his own conflicts of principle and purpose.

John Roberts (John G. Roberts, Jr.) (1955) - American chief justice. Outer: American chief justice. Outer: Of British, Irish and German descent on his paternal side, and Slovak on his maternal. Father was an executive with Bethlehem Steel. Had a Roman Catholic upbringing, along with 3 sisters, and moved as a youngster to Indiana. Good student/athlete at a Catholic boarding school, where he was captain of the football team, and a regional wrestling champ. Graduated first in his class as a National Merit Scholar winner, then received his BA from Harvard in 1976, as a Phi Beta Kappa, while majoring in his/story, with the idea of becoming a professor in that discipline. In 1979, he got his law degree from Harvard Law, where he served as managing editor of the Harvard Law Review, and also garnered more academic honors. Began his career as a U.S. Court of Appeals clerk and in 1980 and 1981, and parlayed that position into clerking for the man he would one day replace, Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist. Followed that stint by continuing in government as a special assistant to the U.S. Attorney General, and then served 4 years as associate counsel to Pres. Ronald Reagan, until 1986, when he went to work for a prestigious Washington law firm. During his run in the Reagan White House, he advocated numerous conservative stances, which he would later disavow during his nomination hearing as spoken only in reflection of his client. Nevertheless, showed himself to be extremely deferential to the executive branch. Argued 39 cases for the U.S. Supreme Court, winning 25 of them, which gave him an intimate idea of how its processes worked. Married Irish Catholic lawyer Jane Sullivan in 1996, 2 adopted children from the union, which would see her exert a strong influence on his decision-making, through a greater sense of compassion than his, thanks to an extremely modest upbringing, and considerable experience directly immersed in working-class America, before getting her degree. During the Florida recount in 2000, he gave advice to both Pres. George Bush and his brother Jeb, and finally became a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the DC circuit in 2003. A scant two years later, he was selected by Pres. Bush to replace the departed William Rehnquist as chief justice of the Supreme Court, thanks to both his previous stated stances, and the fact he had a minimal paper trail. Sailed through his nomination hearings, showing an evasive charm, and a detailed knowledge of the law, without revealing his position on any of the outstanding issues of the day. The American Bar Association gave him their highest ranking, “well qualified,” while the media dubbed him brilliant, thanks to his smooth performance. Once on the bench, to no surprise, he joined the grouping of Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas, as well as the newcomer, Samuel Alito, to present a potential conservative block whose influence will probably stretch for a good generation. Announced initially that he would be an umpire, looking for consensus, and was able to do so on a number of cases, during the early part of what will be a long run on the court. In looking for unanimity in the court’s decision, he has thinned out the grounds on which the cases have been built, as majority decisions rose and dissents dropped, although at the cost of the larger law. Eventually revealed himself as far less interested in creating concrete public policy via the court, than in underlining the symbols of the law, thanks to a deep-rooted distrust of change. Inner: Well-socialized, very conversant with the law, and with a distinct judicial philosophy of creating a consensus court, and if possible a unanimous one. Inadvertently messed up the order of the presidential oath, while administering it to Barack Obama, stumbling over ‘faithfully’ before redoing it the following day, fully berobed in private. In what may prove to be the defining decision of his chief justiceship, oversaw a 5-4 verdict in favor of unlimited corporate spending on election campaigns in 2010, paving the way for bought-and-sold politicians of all stripes on all levels in America’s electoral future. Two years later, he proved to be the swing vote in upholding and writing the majority opinion on the Obama health care mandate, in a surprise display on his part of countermanding the will of his fellow conservatives on the bench, in what seemed like a last second change of heart on his part in supporting the most significant piece of social legislation passed by Congress in decades. Won the eternal enmity of the right for his apostasy of looking at an issue from a legal constitutional standpoint, rather than a political one, in a redefinition of his ongoing stewardship of a court which will ultimately bear his name in his/story’s assessment of it. In 2013, he wrote the majority opinion on gutting the 1965 Voting Rights Act, despite an earlier overwhelming Congressional approval of it. Earned the undying enmity of hard-core conservatives in 2015 by aligning with the liberal justices in upholding the Affordable Care Act giving medical coverage to many who could not otherwise afford it. The next day, he rejoined his fellow conservatives in their minority opinion in an equally far-reaching decision recognizing marriage equality throughout the U.S. no matter its sexual component. The death of Antonin Scalia in early 2016 put the court at 4-4, with Republicans vowing to hold up nominations until the next presidential election. Got his full complement of justices the following year when the Senate broached filibuster rules to add conservative Trump nominee, Neil Gorsuch to the court. Has a net worth of over $4 million. Inner: Well-socialized, very conversant with the law, and with a distinct judicial philosophy of creating a consensus court, and if possible a unanimous one. Conservative, with a strong pragmatic streak, and a deep respect for the order of both tradition and the law, as well as social justice, making his tenure one of the most political in recent his/story. May be epileptic, having upon occasion suffered seizures that knocked him out. Part three lifetime of taking a fast track to power via his greatest strength, a great love of the law, in order to continue to build on his unusual legacy as a serial chief of his country’s highest court during times of great upheaval, as a means of integrating himself with the ever-evolving judicial consciousness of America. Charles Evans Hughes (1862-1948) - American Chief Justice and politician. Outer: Father was a Methodist minister from Wales who converted to Baptist on coming to the U.S., the religion in which his son would be brought up. Mother was of Dutch descent and a commonsensical schoolteacher, while his sire was originally a printer, and an ardent abolitionist. The former was warm and impetuous, while his mother was reserved and prudent. An only child, he became bored with school early on and convinced his parents to homeschool him. The family moved to NYC when he was 12, and put him in public school. 5'11". Graduated the following year, and ultimately wound up at Brown Univ., graduating at 19 with honors, and the youngest member of his class. Taught in upstate NY to earn money for law school, then graduated with highest honors from Columbia Univ. Law School. Practiced law in NYC, and married Antoinette Carter, the daughter of the senior partner in his firm, in 1888, one son and two daughters from union, including Elizabeth Hughes Gosset, who became president of the Supreme Court Historical Society. Taught law at Cornell Univ. Law School in the early 1890s, before returning to his practice. In 1905, he was appointed council to a NY state legislative committee and discovered corruption in gas and utilities in NYC, which led to lower rates. The following year he did the same with NY based life insurance companies, which gave him entree into the political arena, and he went on to defeat publisher William Randolph Hearst for the governorship, serving two terms from 1907 to 1910. During his time in office, he backed progressive labor and welfare legislation, and instituted administrative reforms, while regulating the two industries he had earlier investigated. In 1910, Pres. William Howard Taft (Bill Clinton) appointed him an associate justice of the Supreme Court. Left the bench in 1916 to accept the nomination for the presidency for the Republican Party, while also being endorsed by the Progressive Party. Narrowly lost to the incumbent, Woodrow Wilson, after being accused of political ineptitude. Served in various capacities until 1921, when he was named Secretary of State by Pres. Warren Harding (Warren Beatty), and on the latter’s death, continued under his successor Calvin Coolidge (William Bennett), until 1925. Urged U.S. entry into the League of Nations, with some reservations, and also American membership in the World Court, although neither stance was adopted. Helped implement the Dawes plan, where U.S. bankers loaned money to Germany to reorganize its finances and also ended the naval arms race. Returned to private law practice, and in 1929, he became a judge on the Court of International Justice at the Hague. The following year, he was made chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Acted as a moderate and often the swing vote on a court that was evenly divided between liberals and conservatives all during the initial New Deal era of Franklin Roosevelt. Showed himself to be a conservative in his support of the business community, and liberal in his going after abuses that threw industrial society out-of-balance. Upheld federal authority in dealing with the economic debacle of the Depression, but was also sensitive to minority rights. In 1937, when Roosevelt tried to pack the court with extra justices, he was one of its most eloquent opponents of the plan, although afterwards was an effective voice in making the court more amenable to the president’s New Deal legislation. Retired in 1941, and spent his last years writing in order to preserve his legacy, penning several books on both peace and the Supreme Court. Died of congestive heart failure. Inner: Scholarly, meticulous, reserved and dignified. Always protective of his public life. Pragmatic, with a great respect for the past and past precedent. Extremely intelligent and hardworking, with a great confidence in his unerring ability to properly adjudicate any judicial decision given him, thanks to a practical, rather than ideological nature. Gavel-pounding lifetime of continuing his strong identification with the supreme court of the land, proving to be a practical voice of moderation in unsettling times, with problem-solving, rather than politics, his underlying principle. John Jay (1745-1829) - American politician and first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. Outer: Of French Huguenot descent on his father’s side, and Dutch ancestry on his mother’s. The latter was a member of the land rich Van Cortlandts, giving him a wealthy and highly influential background of NYC merchants. 6th son out of 8 children. Serious, bookish, pious and sedate as a child, evincing self-confidence and self-satisfaction, rather than ambition. Attended King’s College, which would later become Columbia, and began practicing law in 1768 with Robert Livingston (Mark Zuckerberg), to whom he was related by marriage. Tall, slender, wiry and graceful. Had arched eyebrows, a Gallic nose and a long chin, while he was frequently in ailing health. Became involved in politics as secretary to the NY committee on correspondence, where he showed himself to be both a protector of American property rights and a respecter of British law. In 1774, he married Sarah Livingston, the daughter of William Livingston (William Paley), 2 sons and 5 daughters from the union. Served as a delegate to both Continent Congresses, but opposed the Declaration of Independence, fearing it would lead to mob rule. Once it was adopted, however, he supported the American Revolutionary cause, initially taking the stances of both reason and moderation. Failed in his initial attempt at abolishing slavery, but helped draft the NY state constitution, then served as chief justice of NY from 1777 to 1778, before acting as president of the Continental Congress. Became minister plenipotentiary to Spain in 1779, serving in an extremely important diplomatic role. Negotiated peace treaties with both Spain and France, but failed to get aid and diplomatic recognition from the former. In 1782, he, Benjamin Franklin (R. Buckminster Fuller) and John Adams (Martin Sheen), went to Paris to negotiate a peace treaty with Great Britain, following the Revolutionary War. Despised the French as residue from his own Huguenot roots, and operated more from his own ongoing anglophilia, than any strong belief in independence. From 1784 to 1789, he served as the first Secretary of Foreign Affairs, a prelude office to Secretary of State. Saw that the office did not give him the authority to cement America as an international presence. With Alexander Hamilton (John F. Kennedy) and James Madison (Woodrow Wilson), he wrote the Federalist Papers, a collection of essays that promulgating a strong central government and the adoption of the federal Constitution, that would supplant the Articles of Confederation. In 1789, he was named the first chief justice of the Supreme Court, because of his eloquent and partisan work on the ratification of the Constitution. His most noted decision was Chisholm vs. Georgia in 1793, subordinating state sovereignty to the will of the larger government. Went to England in 1794 for Jay’s Treaty, which underlined peace with Great Britain, but at a price, with most points of contention around trade and high seas traffic unresolved, making him pessimistic about the ultimate power of the country in the international realm. Although the treaty was unpopular, it was ratified and signed into law. Resigned his position on the court, seeing it held little real future as an effective instrument of justice and was elected governor of NY as a Federalist, serving from 1795 to 1800. After working towards emancipation for several decades, and buying slaves to free them, he finally signed into law the freeing of NY’s slaves in 1799. Greatly saddened by the early death of his wife, he spent the last 28 years of his life in complete retirement on his 800 acre farm, where he died of a stroke. Inner: Scholarly, stubborn sagacious, and largely humorless. Also vain, albeit not disagreeable in his high self-regard and concern for his reputation. Great respecter of the law, as well as property rights, rational order and also of the old-fashioned virtues of honesty, probity and hard work. Suspicious and pro-British, particularly in terms of governmental and judicial precedents. Less the rationalist than the believer in authority of established order. Felt only tax payers should vote, and despised the back and forth of ordinary politics. Always willing to compromise and cooperate with opponents. Conflicted lifetime of being thrust into the forefront in radical, revolutionary times, despite a reactionary overview to many of the tasks given him, which has necessitated a continued return to the same office, in order to integrate himself more fully with its powers, precedents and principles, and also loosen his overly serious and self-important mien in the process.

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PATHWAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTIST/INDUSTRIALIST TURNED POLITICO:
Storyline: The Carolina congressman serially explores his many sides, from soldier to businessman to lawyerly statesman as an ongoing hawk, with a judicious desire to make his unique mark on the American landscape.

Lindsey Graham (1955) - American politician. Outer: Parents ran a restaurant-bar-pool hall liquor store called the “Sanitary Cafe.” The older of two with a younger sister. Lost his mother at 21 to Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and his father 1 months later to a heart attack. Helped raise his sister who was 8 years younger, while also attending the Univ. of South Carolina, joining its ROTC. 5’7”, with blue eyes. Graduated with a BA in psychology in 1977, and four years later got his J.D. from the Univ. of South Carolina School of Law. The following annum has was commissioned an officer in the Air Force’s Judge Advocate office. Sent to Frankfurt, Germany, where he was both a military prosecutor and defense attorney. In the latter role he exposed the AF’s poor drug-testing procedures in a celebrated case. Returned to South Carolina after four years and left active duty in 1989 to become an attorney, while joining the SC Air National Guard, serving until 1995, before entering the U.S. Air Force Reserve. During the 1991 Gulf War, he served in the Judge Advocate’s office in South Carolina, briefing pilots on war laws, while falsely describing himself on his website as a Desert Shield and Desert Storm veteran, forcing him to backtrack on his claims since he never left stateside. Elected to the SC House of Representatives in 2002 then two years later was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, the first Republican to represent his district since 1877. Won his next three elections by greater and greater margins. Took part in an attempt to deprive Newt Gingrich of his speakership in 1997, and the following annum, as a member of the Judiciary Committee, he was the only Republican to vote against any of the articles of impeachment contra Pres. Bill Clinton. In 2002, he won South Carolina’s senate seat, replacing longtime Senator Strom Thurmond. Became one of casino billionaire Sheldon Adelson’s voices in Congress, continually trying to rescind the legality of on-line gambling, since it competed with the former’s empire. The latter would bankroll his political career in exchange for his legislative service, helping him to out-spend his opponent in his successful 2008 re-election bid. A hawk who supported all the Bush’s administration military adventurism, although relatively moderate on many issues, with a willingness to work in bi-partisan manner with Democrats on some hard-core conservative issues, such as immigration and tax reform. In 2004, he was made a colonel, and in 2007 briefly returned to active duty. Served in Afghanistan in 2009, although was never in a combat situation. Developed a reputation for compromising himself with Democrats, along with refusing not to confirm Pres. Obama’s Supreme court candidates for philosophical reasons, eliciting low approval ratings, although he managed to win a third term in 2014, through good political instincts, strong financial backing, and a huge crew of staffers and volunteers. Able to blanket the state with ads, while refusing to compromise himself with Tea Party advocates, allowing him to win handily. Finally retired from the Air Force in 2015, after reaching mandatory retirement age. In June of that year, he announced his candidacy for the Republican nomination for president, as someone who wishes the party to be far more inclusive. Never married, describing himself as a loner, although questions about his sexual orientation would emerge, without any proof that he was anything but heterosexual. Promised he would have a rotating first lady if elected. His announcement would see him polling near the bottom of the field. Reacted to the Charleston Church massacre of 9 black people by saying they were anti-Christian in nature, rather than racist and defended the Confederate Flag above the statehouse by saying it’s who we are, unconsciously denying black people as part of the ‘we’. More gracious than his fellow candidates in his disagreement with the Supreme Court’s marriage equality ruling, feeling the constitution should not be amended to accommodate the fears and loathings of his fellow homophobes. Dismayed by Donald Trump’s dominance in the early campaign, feeling he’s a total idiot and could spell the end of the Republican Party, while his fellow candidates, save for Jeb Bush, remain in his thrall and could spell the end of the Republican Party. Able to shine at the second tier second debate in September, with zingers and barbs galore, both against his fellow debaters, and Hillary Clinton while limning Donald Trump as nothing more than a cartoon character, by utilizing his folksy style to excellent advantage in hopes of moving up to the central arena of candidates, although by the fourth debate, he found himself excluded even from the undercard, because of minuscule poll numbers. Dropped out of the race at year’s end, having never caught the imagination of primary voters. Following Donald Trump’s win, he became a critic of numerous aspects of his administration, despite showing his loyalty to his over-all party’s platform. Has a much lower net worth than most members of Congress. Inner: Open on a variety of issues, such as climate change legislation, with a standard conservative view on others such as supporting NSA gathering data on American citizens. Thoughtful with a good sense of humor, and a willingness to listen to opposing views. Lone hawk lifetime of flying his own patterns and forging his own unique presence on the national scene, with the ultimate aim of bringing his brand of judicious savvy to bear on the presidency. Bowman Gray, Sr. (1874-1935) - American industrialist, and philanthropist. Outer: From a family of bankers, with his father a Confederate Army veteran, and later a philanthropist. Second son and oldest to survive infancy, with a younger sister and brother, who also became a president of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. Attended the Univ. of North Carolina for a year, but dropped out to become a teller in the Wachovia Bank, which his father and grandfather had founded. In 1895, he went to work for the R.J. Reynolds Co., manufacturers of cigarettes. Worked in Georgia, then Baltimore where he married Nathalie Lyons in 1902. Two sons from the union. The duo moved back to Winston-Salem, NC in 1912 where he became vice president and director of the Reynolds Co. In 1924 he was elevated to president and in 1932, became chairman of the board. A philanthropist, he donated large sums of money to Wake Forest College, the Univ. of NC and a variety of churches, hospitals and orphanages. Died on a cruise near Norway, and was buried at sea above the Arctic Circle. His will bequeathed RJ Reynolds stock to Wake Forest Univ. for what would become the Bowman Gray School of Medicine. His wife outlived him by three and a half decades and married again. Inner: Largely hidden character, competently tackling everything he took on. Many warriors turn to healing as a means of undergoing the other side of themselves, although he did it indirectly via philanthropy. His father’s son lifetime of exploring his business skills, via his upbringing, in his ongoing desire to experience a host of avenues in the power realm. Barnard Bee (1824-1861) - American Confederate general. Outer: Both his parents were of English descent and from prominent Charleston families. Father of the same name moved the family to Texas when his son was 12, to serve as secretary of state. Older brother Hamilton was also a Confederate general. Also had 3 younger sisters. Stayed in South Carolina with his mother’s family, where he went to school. Appointed to West Point, he graduated 33rd in his class of 41 in 1845 and was brevetted a 2nd lieutenant in an infantry regiment. Fought in the Mexican War with distinction and was wounded and brevetted a captain two years later. Served as an adjutant with a garrison in Mississippi and also did frontier duty in Texas and Mexico, where he became a 1st lieutenant in 1851. Scouted in NM and became an infantry captain in 1855. Went to cavalry school and then was on frontier duty in Minnesota, before fighting in the Utah War. Brevetted to lieutenant-colonel, before ending his regular army career on frontier duty, as commanding officer of Fort Laramie in Wyoming. In 1856, he married Sophia Elizabeth Hill, the daughter of an asst. quartermaster. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he resigned his commission, and was made lt.-colonel of Carolina regulars, an artillery regiment. By June of 1861, he had become a brigadier general, and commanded a brigade under Gen. Pierre Beauregard (Dane DeHaan). Fought in the first Battle of Bull Run, in Virginia where he allegedly gave Thomas Jackson (George S. Patton) his nickname of ‘Stonewall’ either as a compliment or a denigration, when his own men were forced to bear the brunt of the Yankee charge. Constantly at the head of his brigade, he was mortally wounded just as the enemy’s assault lessened. Died in a small cabin near the battlefield that had been his headquarters, and his body was brought back to South Carolina for burial. Inner: Stalwart soldier, very much imbued with the military life, and his own sense of both duty and adventure. Gallant lifetime of falling on the field as one of the very first generals to die in the American Civil War, before returning to explore other aspects of himself.


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PATHWAY OF THE POLITICIAN AS LONGTIME NEW JERSEYITE:
Storyline: The irrepressible Republican literally and figuratively expands both his reach and himself in his desire to be a national figure, after earlier serving as a corrupt and controlling machine politician who could brook no opposition to his considerable will.

Chris Christie (Christopher James Christie) (1962) - American politician. Outer: Of German, Scottish and Irish descent on his paternal side, and Sicilian on his maternal. Father was a CPA, while mother was the dominant figure in his growing up. Raised Roman Catholic, and became interested in politics in high school. 5’10” and well over 300 pounds, with brown eyes and black hair. Earned a B.A. in political science from the Univ. of Delaware in 1984. While in law school he married Mary Pat Foster in 1986, after meeting her in college, two sons and two daughters from the union, which saw her become a bond trader. Graduated Seton Hall Univ. of Law School in New Jersey in 1987, and was admitted to the state bar. Went to work for a large law firm in 1987, becoming a partner in 1993 and remaining with them until 2001, while registering as a lobbyist. Lost badly in his first election to the State Assembly in 1995 which soured him on politics, and he became a lobbyist for energy companies. After working on the George W. Bush campaign, he was rewarded in 2001, with a position as U.S. Attorney for New Jersey, despite having no prosecutorial experience. Nevertheless, he proved aggressive against corrupt public officials of both parties, winning 130 cases and losing none. Held that post until 2008, earning the reputation of being ethical and fair-minded and two years later, he ran for and won as Republican Governor of New Jersey, proving to be a feisty, controlling figure and ultimately controversy-tinged, despite a facility for moving his legislation through the state’s houses. Fought teacher’s unions, although remained a popular figure as a moderate in a traditionally liberal state. Served as keynote speaker at the Republican National Convention in 2012, talking almost exclusively about himself. Used the calamitous Hurricane Sandy later that year to good political advantage, showing great concern for the state’s damaged coast, while working hand-in-hand with the Democratic administration to try to alleviate the considerable physical and psychological damage it wrecked. Easily won re-election with 60% of the vote, positioning himself for a 2016 presidential run, despite a traffic scandal when two lanes over the Geo. Washington Bridge were closed in recompense for a mayor of Ft. Lee not supporting him. Although his poll numbers dropped, they still remained high enough for him to begin working to refurbish his image. Shed some 85 pounds after lap band surgery in 2014, bringing him down to a healthier 230+. After two of his staff were indicted for the Bridge/gate scandal in May of 2015, the fall-out showed his popularity in NJ sinking to an all-time low, at 35%. Declared for the presidency in June in his high school gym, while teachers protested outside about his broken promise to protect their pensions and his insulting them on top of it. Positioned himself as someone who boldly tells it like it is, while faring well in the early debates which raised his status in the power rankings. Nevertheless, he was reduced to secondary status by the fourth debate, much to his displeasure, even though he got the endorsement of the New Hampshire Union-Leader the state’s most influential conservative paper. Roundly condemned afterwards by several of New Jersey’s newspapers as an abysmal failure in virtually every governance category. Forced out of the race after the New Hampshire primary in February, having gotten little real traction among his fellow candidates. Endorsed Trump afterwards. while avoiding going back to New Jersey to deal with the mess he had created, garnering much criticism for both actions. Remained a stalwart Trump supporter, hoping for a VP nod from him, when he got the nomination, and then was livid when he didn’t receive it. Put in charge of Trump’s transition team after the latter’s surprise presidential win, then was demoted to assistant to VP-elect Mike Pence, following the conviction of two of his aides for Bridgegate, which Trump felt he should have taken responsibility for it. After failing to agree on the 2017 state budget, he ordered a govt shutdown of all beaches and public parks just prior to the 4th of July, while he and his family used one of them. After kicking sand in everyone’s face through his blatant powertripping, he approved the budget deal just before the 4th. Has an extremely low approval rating of 15%, as well as a net worth of $4 million. Inner: Extroverted, combative, aggressive, blunt and direct. Obsessed with “the Boss,” New Jersey’s Bruce Springsteen, going to all his concerts, while the singer continually refuses to meet him. Keenly political and self-absorbed, while looking to make the most of every situation in which he finds himself. Fat and feisty lifetime of eschewing the greedy corruption of his previous go-round in this series, to focus on sheer power, in order to realize the ultimate in American elective actualities, the presidency. Frank Hague (1876-1956) - American politician. Outer: Of Irish Catholic descent. Parents were immigrants from Ireland. Father worked as a blacksmith for the Erie Railroad until he was appointed a bank guard by a local Democratic leader. Mother was aggressive and puritanical, and imbued her Church-going ways in him. 4th of 8 children. Raised in an Irish slum called the Horseshoe. Expelled from school at 14 for both poor attendance and unruly behavior, and spent much of his time at a local gym, training to be a prizefighter. Wound up successfully managing one instead, which led to his being put up for constable by a tavern owner, and he won his first election in 1896 by paying off voters, as a prelude to a career of unbridled corruption. 6’ and red-haired. Helped get out the Democratic vote for his ward, since irish Catholics were its dominant bloc and was appointed Deputy Sheriff, while serving as a ward heeler. Lied in court in Massachusetts to help an old pal, and wound up being fined and stripped of his position, which only made him more popular with his constituency. Still living at home, when he married Jennie W. Warner in 1903. A daughter died in infancy, while his son of the same name benefited from his political pull. His wife served no other purpose in his life and remained deep in the background throughout. In 1905, he was elected to his fourth term as a constable. Continued his steady rise in the Democratic political machine, moving up from street and water commissioner in 1911 to commissioner of public safety in 1916, putting him in charge of the police and fire departments and allowing him to take full advantage of the progressive reformist atmosphere of the state. Elected mayor in 1917 under the slogan of “the unbossed,” even though he wound up with less votes than his opponent, thereby beginning a thirty year reign as the dominating force in Jersey City and Hudson County politics. Because of subsequent landslide victories in his counties, Democrats won the governorship of New Jersey six out of nine times during his long tenure, thanks to his canvassing and providing transportation for voters, which allowed him to support candidates of his choice in local, state and national elections. That included not removing the dead from the voting rolls to insure even more votes than registered voters. Nothing ever got done without kickbacks sliding across his desk, while he made sure the working poor were served with one of the grandest hospitals in the nation. Prudish and puritan, he allowed no brothels or nightclubs in the city, and limited all games of chance to church raffles, while barring women from bars. Maintained power by controlling newspapers, intimidating opponents, making arrests and having his ward heelers distribute patronage. Pocketed cash from suppliers to the city, while also buying land that was condemned and then bought by the city at exorbitant prices. Ultimately served seven and a half four years terms. Lost much of his power after the 1949 election, thanks to a population swap of eastern Europeans and African-Americans in Jersey City, whose interests he no longer reflected. In 1952, the state Democratic organization ousted him as a national committeeman. Largely stayed away from Jersey City his last years because of pending law suits against him, dividing his time between Florida and NYC. Died in his NYC Park Avenue duplex on New Year’s Day of complications from arthritis. Little mourned at his funeral service, since he could no longer bestow favors on anyone, he was buried in an ostentatious mausoleum, while his wealth was estimated at over $10 million at the time of his death, despite earning a salary of $7500 to $8000 as mayor. Inner: Cold and calculating, with a chronic stomach condition. Neither smoked nor drank. Thin-skinned, and a fancy dresser with high-necked collars and a diamond stickpin. Liked being called Mr. Mayor or Mayor Hague, even by longtime friends. Constantly on the phone, while eschewing any written records of his dealings. Shy with women, aggressive with men, in his odd combination of benevolence and violence. I am the law lifetime of combining control, corruption and good works into an amalgam of urban and county power that made him rich, reviled and a figure not to be crossed. William Franklin (c1730-1813) - Colonial American royal governor. Outer: Illegitimate son of polymath Benjamin Franklin (R. Buckminster Fuller). Mother’s name was never revealed, since his sire did not want to impugn her honor because they were unmarried, although she may have been BF’s future common law wife, Deborah Reed. Raised in Philadelphia, he was well-educated, per his sire’s instructions. As a teen he fought in King George’s War in Albany, rising to the rank of captain in 1747. Often accompanied his progenitor on his missions abroad, and while in London, he sired an illegitimate son, who was placed in foster care. In 1762, still in England, he wed Elizabeth Downes, the daughter of a Barbados sugar planter. No children from the union which ended in her death in 1777. Completed his law education in England and was admitted to the bar, while working with his father to obtain land grants in the American mid-west. Thanks to BF’s influence, on returning to America in 1763, he was appointed Royal Governor of New Jersey, and when the American Revolution began, he remained loyal to the crown, finding himself on opposite sides to his sire, which permanently strained their relationship to the point where the latter left him nothing in his will. In 1776, he was arrested and held prisoner in Connecticut for two years, then was active in NYC’s Loyalist community, with the city still occupied by the British. At the conclusion of hostilities and independence, he fled to England in 1783, never to return to America. He and his sire met for a final time in London in 1785, with nothing resolved between them. Married Mary Johnson d’Evelin, a widow with offspring in 1788, and continued to support the Loyalist cause in North America, since many in England felt the war was not over His last years are ill-recorded and he ultimately died without any money. Inner: Headstrong lifetime of trying to give himself legitimacy as a loyalist to a nation that his father ultimately rejected, only to be rejected himself by his native land, necessitating a return that would be redolent with absolute control, so as not to fall victim to forces beyond his capacity to influence.


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PATHWAY OF THE POLITICIAN AS HEALER AND SELF-STYLED PATRIOT:
Storyline: The loose cannon libertarian follows his father’s precise footsteps in his ongoing desire to utilize his facility for remedying physical wrongs in order to re-create an America according to his own vision of it.

Rand Paul (Randall Howard Paul) (1963) - American physician and politician. Outer: Of mostly German and slightly Irish descent on his paternal side, and Welsh, English and Scot-northern Iris on his maternal side. Paternal grandfather was a German immigrant. Father was Ron Paul, an obstetrician turned libertarian congressman and 2012 U.S. presidential candidate. Third of five children with two brothers and two sisters. Baptized and raised an Episcopalian. When he was 5 the family moved from Pennsylvania to Texas, and he grew up in a small town there. At 13, his progenitor was elected to the House and he spent his summers interning in his congressional office. An active athlete in high school, he went to Baylor Univ., where he was on the swim team and contributed to the school newspaper, as well as being involved in politics, although left without a degree, to matriculate at Duke Univ. Medical School, getting his M.D. in 1988. 5’9” with reddish curly hair and sightly thyroid eyes. Pursued a general surgery internship at the Georgia Baptist Medical Center in Atlanta, and while there met Kelley Ashby. The duo married in 1991, three sons from the close union. Did an ophthalmology residency at Duke then moved to his wife’s home state of Kentucky to start his medical practice. While he was deciding to run for the presidency, she worked as a political consultant, but quit so as not to cause a conflict of interest, while thoroughly backing her mate’s desire for national office, and serving as one of his key strategists. Co-founded the Southern Kentucky Lions Eye Clinic, a nonprofit offering free eye care to patients in need and also did free eye surgeries for impoverished children in developing countries. In 1994, he founded Kentucky Taxpayers United, a taxpayer watchdog group, citing his involvement in it as his foundation for becoming drawn into politics. Also occasionally filled in for his father’s unsuccessful libertarian runs for the presidency. The economic crisis of 2008 brought him into the Tea Party and the following year he ran for the U.S. Senate from Kentucky. Resoundingly won the primary in an upset, and came under national scrutiny for comments he had made that were deemed quite radical. Nevertheless, he won the seat as the earliest candidate closely identified with the Tea Party, while his father-son tandem of House and Senate were a first, as well. Pro-business. pro-Israel and anti-tax, anti-abortion and anti marriage equality, as well as anti-big government, although also anti-military-intervention, despite not being anti-war in principle. Against government surveillance, as well as other leftist sentiments, making him a mixed political bag, and subject of criticism from both the right and left. In April of 2015, he announced his candidacy for the presidency on his website, claiming as his primary issues the principles of liberty and limited government. A number of high profile interviews followed, in which he acted quite testy, while fellow candidate Ted Cruz singled him out as the person he would most like to defeat. Showed himself to be an unambiguous opponent of renewing the government’s power to collect data on citizens’ private communications, while also stating, America was better off with Saddam Hussein in power, opining that every time the U.S. toppled a secular strong man, its gotten chaos and more radical Islam, and less safety because of it. Has written several books including “Government Bullies” in 2012 making plaint about the abuse of Federal power. Led the Senate fight against the Patriot Act’s renewal in 2015, in a desire to protect the privacy of ordinary citizens, making him a target of Republican anger for doing so, as it later was passed with much of its substance intact. The two top officials of his super PAC, America’s Liberty, were indicted on bribery charges surrounding his father’s 2012 run, shaking up his money support, despite two other PACS still in his now tarnished libertarian corner. Mutually acrimonious with frontrunner Donald Trump, with both stating unequivocally that neither had what it takes to be an effective president, despite his own substantive proposals on criminal justice, noninterventionism and civil liberties. As reflection of his subsequent uninspiring campaign, his new book - "Our Presidents & Their Prayers,” suffered abysmal sales, with the public showing little interest in what he had to say. Ended his run after the Iowa caucuses in order to focus on his senatorial race, which he won, pledging to obliterate Obamacare in his first days in office. The effort failed over-all thanks to Donald Trump’s mercurial leadership, although he later supported his tax cuts. Has a net worth of $2 1/2 million. Inner: Thin-skinned and prickly, and not that easy to categorize. Highly selective in his support for some military actions and opposed to others. Both pro NRA and pro organizations hostile to it, so as to be more of a bête noire to the right than the left. Sees radical Islam as America’s greatest threat. Vision-oriented lifetime of following closely in his father’s footsteps to become a national champion of sorts of the anti-big government crowd, while harboring a host of conflicts around his various libertarian stances in his ongoing education around healing both himself and his nation-at-large. Walter Reed (1851-1902) - American physician. Outer: Father was a Methodist minister. Youngest of five children. During his childhood, his parents moved to other parishes, so he grew up in several places. Went to college at the Univ. of Virginia at 16, under the care of an older brother, and earned his medical degree in 1869 at the age of 18, becoming the youngest ever to achieve that accomplishment. Enrolled afterwards at NYU’s Bellevue Hospital Medical College, and got a second degree there the following annum, while interning at various NYC hospitals. Also served on the Brooklyn Board of Health as an assistant sanitary officer, which exposed him to the city’s large immigrant community and its endless assortment of cases to treat and study. Developed a lifelong interest in public health through the experience, which precluded his opening a private practice. Worked in NYC until 1875. The following year he joined the Army Medical Corps for both financial security and the opportunities it afforded him, after marrying Emily Blackwell Lawrence, who would outlive him by nearly half a century. Son and daughter from the union. Served as a medical officer in various difficult frontier Army posts in the west until 1893, when he finished advance coursework in pathology and bacteriology at the John Hopkins Univ. Hospital Pathology Lab. His timing coincided with medicine’s realizing that bacteria and germs were disease causes, rather than earlier superstitions that had plagued the discipline. In 1893, he joined the Army Medical School in Washington, DC where he held a professorship in Bacteriology and Clinical Microscopy. Also became curator of the Army Medical Museum and joined the faculty of Columbian Univ. Began researching a host of diseases, publishing papers on them, and in 1898, was made chairman of a panel set up to investigate an epidemic of typhoid fever in U.S. army encampments fighting in the Spanish-American War. He and his colleagues discovered that fly contamination was the cause. Two years later, now a major, he was appointed head of a commission charged with determining the cause of tropical diseases, during which time he discovered that yellow fever was brought on by a mosquito carrier, after earlier showing what didn’t cause it. Their breeding grounds were subsequently destroyed, which opened the way for the building of the Panama Canal, after yellow fever had completely stymied the French two decades earlier. It also marked the first time a human viral disease had been thoroughly researched. His Commission's use of experimental controls with human volunteers and meticulous records served as a model for medical research through the early twentieth century. Continued to speak and publish on yellow fever following his return, and was given several honorary degrees. Unexpectedly, his appendix suddenly burst and he died on the operating table from peritonitis. After his death, the army named its premier medical research center in Washington after him. Buried in Arlington National Cemetery. Inner: Strong desire to improve public health and willing to sacrifice a private career to do so. Modest, defraying credit for his discovery by citing the work of others. Excellent deductive reasoning powers. Hall of fame lifetime of exemplary public service, making him an immortal in the medical annals of western civilization. Lyman Hall (1724-1790) - American physician, governor and preacher. Outer: Of English descent, fourth of 8 children, from a Connecticut Yankee family. Grew up in a Congregationalist community and graduated from Yale Univ. in 1747, while studying theology under an uncl.. in 1749, he became a minister in Bridgeport, Conn, although his parishioners found him morally wanting and he was dismissed two years later. Confessed to his sins, and because he was repentant, he continued preaching elsewhere for two more years. In 1752, he wed Abigail Burr, only to see her die the following year, which inspired him to become a doctor. Apprenticed himself to a physician for his MD training. In 1757, he married Mary Osborne, one son from the union. Decided there was more opportunity for a doctor in the south, and moved to South Carolina, near Charleston, where he opened a medical practice, then followed his fellow Congregationalists to Sunbury, Georgia, becoming one of the city’s leading citizens, while also operating a rice plantation. Served as a delegate to the Second Continental Congress, and became one of three Georgians to sign the Declaration of Independence. Forced to flee north when Sunbury was burned by the British and his rice plantation was destroyed. Returned to his native Connecticut and remained there until 1782. Resettled in Savannah and was elected an early governor of the state, holding that position for a year. Helped charter what would become the Univ. of Georgia. Later served as an assemblyman and judge. Moved to a plantation on the Georgia/Carolina border in 1790, and died there the same annum. Two years later his son passed on, and the following year so did his wife, so that his entire family left this mortal coil within three years of one another. Ultimately had a county in Georgia named after him. Inner: Genuine patriot, with a desire to help, heal and uplift. Founding father lifetime of mixing medicine, politics and religion, along with his own exploitative flaws in his ongoing need and desire to reshape America according to his own vision of how things should be in the United States.


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PATHWAY OF THE POLITICIAN AS LONGTIME DO-GOODER:
Storyline: The Maryland majordomo steps out from in back of the curtain, after long serving others from behind-the-scenes, in order to explore his own potential for elective office, with his previous masters as models for his own desire to stand tall in the sun.

Martin O’Malley (1963) - American politician. Outer: Of Irish, German and Dutch ancestry. Both grandparents were politically active, one a ward boss, the other chairman of an Indiana congressional district. Father was a criminal defense attorney, who served as an Air Force bombardier during WW II, directly witnessing the atomic blast over Hiroshima, and later did pro bono legal work. Mother had been a longtime Capital Hill receptionist. Third of six siblings, and raised Roman Catholic. Imbued with the Jesuit ideal of being ‘a man for others,’ in high school, while identifying strongly with Irish oppression. 6’, with piercing green eyes. Formed a Celtic band, Shannon Tide, in high school, and did the Irish pub circuit. Later formed the Celtic and folk rock band, O’Malley’s March, a seven member group in 1988, serving as lead singer as well as banjo picker and guitarist. Worked in Gary Hart’s 1984 presidential campaign, thinking he would be a behind the scenes figure, as he had been in his previous go-rounds in this seres. Showed himself to be a gifted organizer, becoming a floor leader at the Democratic convention. Matriculated at Catholic Univ. of the Americas, graduating in 1985, then went to the Univ. of Maryland Law School and became enamored of Baltimore. Worked for the Hart campaign again in 1988, then felt totally betrayed by his blatant sexual hi-jinks. Worked as a legislative fellow in Sen. Barbara Mikulski’s office, which convinced him to run for public office. Earned his J.D. in 1988, and passed the bar the same year. In 1990 he wed Katie Curran, the daughter of a Maryland attorney general, and she, in turn, became a district court judge. Two sons and two daughters from the union. Served as a prosecutor, then narrowly lost in a state Senate race, in his first personal experience of elective politics, before winning a seat on the Baltimore city council in 1991. Pushed for zero-tolerance policing in response to the city’s high crime rate, although failed to statistically lower it. After serving until 1999, he almost quit politics, but instead ran for mayor, surprising everyone by winning big, with public safety as his main issue. Shook up the bureaucracy, and was unafraid of confrontation, while using a statistics-based crime-fighting system, which isolated areas. Although it did not lower the murder rate, it helped somewhat in controlling law-breaking. Told by Bill Clinton in 2002 that he would probably go all the way to the presidency. Won re-election as mayor overwhelmingly,, and spoke at the 2004 Democratic Convention, raising his national presence. Two years later, he ran for governor of Maryland, deflating crime statistics in Baltimore as proof his methods worked, despite considerable questioning surrounding the statement. At the same, he was forced to weather internet rumors that his marriage was in trouble through infidelity on his part. Won handily for governor in 2006, and was able to implement measures to deal with the state’s budget deficit by raising taxes and enforcing statistically-based anti-crime measures. A numbers-crunching technocrat, he employed statistical measuring in other areas as well as a means of dealing with governmental problems. With an eye towards even higher office, he was elected chairman of the Democratic Governors Assoc. in 2010. Won a second term that year, and implemented a liberal agenda dealing with infrastructure, job creation and education. Pro same-sex marriage contra to his Catholic upbringing, he helped usher in a bill that made it legal in the state. An opponent of capital punishment, he commuted several death row inmates to life sentences without parole. Had a prime-time speaking slot at the 2012 Democratic convention, while underlining his wonky approach to governing, that things that get measured get done. Following his term of office, he became a Johns Hopkins Univ. Carey Business School visiting professor. and in 2015, threw his hat in the ring as a challenger to Hillary Clinton, as a potential replacement, should health issues derail the inevitability of her nomination. Also positioned himself as her replacement in 2020, should she win and only go for one term, while accusing the DNC of rigging the primary process in her favor. Easily eclipsed by Bernie Sanders’s surprise rise in the early going, thanks to an anti-corporate message far more resonate than his own. Gave a spirited performance at the first October Democratic debate, and was able to hold his own with his two main competitors, Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders, as an alternative choice to them, as well as a possibility for 2020. Never caught traction and suspended his campaign after a weak showing in the opening Iowa caucus. Inner: Good speaker with high ambitions for himself, and a persuasive political personality, basing his approach to all issues on statistical measurement. Greatly interested in returning the Democrats to their populist roots, contra big money and Wall Street’s overwhelming dominance on political debate. Front and center lifetime of coming out from behind the curtain after many a go-round as organizer and political back-up in order to directly experience the agonies and ecstasies of elective politics. Cordell Hull (1871-1958) - American politician, cabinet member and Nobel laureate. Outer: Of English descent, with many ancestors having fought in the Revolutionary War. Born in a log cabin, the third of five sons of a farmer who became a lumber merchant. Went to a one-room school that his progenitor had built, then attended a series of academies and school before receiving his law degree in 1891 from Cumberland Univ. in Lebanon, Tenn. Tall, lean and shy in manner. Practiced law, but had a stronger interest in politics and in 1893 won a seat in the Tennessee House of Representatives, holding it for four years as a Democrat. Served as a captain in a Tennessee regiment during the Spanish-American War, then returned to practice law. Made judge of the Fifth judicial district from 1903, until 1907, when he was elected to Congress, as a Tennessee Representative, holding that office until 1931, save for two years when he was chairman of the Democratic National Committee. Married a widow, Rose Frances Whitney, of Austrian-Jewish descent in 1917, no children from the union. Served as a member of the powerful House Ways and Means Committee for 18 years, and in 1913 was the author of the first Federal Income Tax bill, as well as other tax laws, as a recognized expert in commercial and fiscal policies. Elected a U.S. senator in 1931, but resigned when he was made Secretary of State by Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt (Gerhard Schroeder) in 1933. Continued in the same position until 1944 when health problems caused him resign. Managed in those 11 years to fashion the longest tenure in American his/story in that pivotal office. Able to win the trust of Latin American diplomats in 1933 at a Pan-American Conference, laying the foundation for the ‘good neighbor’ policy among the 21 nations involved. Negotiated reciprocal trade agreements with numerous countries, lowering tariffs, while advocating rearmament in response to the rise of European dictators, so as to help in Roosevelt’s manipulations of a largely isolationist America into WW II as an answer to the decade-long Depression of the 1930s. Helped in the organization of the United Nations, and served as a member and senior adviser to the American delegation in San Francisco in 1945, in the hopes that the UN would help avoid a third world war. The same year, he won the Nobel Peace Prize. Suffered from sarcoldosis most of his life, an inflammatory dis-ease that especially effects the lungs and lymph glands. Spent his last decade in retirement and lost his wife the year before he died after suffering several heart attacks and strokes. Inner: Not a particularly effective orator, with his strengths lying in his earnestness and sincerity. Able to accommodate the wishes of FDR in moving America out of its isolationist stance, so as to use that longtime palliative war, as a means of ending the Depression, before becoming a champion of peace. Tireless worker, and strongly cerebral, with the ability to analyze situations and come up with practical solutions. Humble roots lifetime of rising to a central role in the world of the 1930s and 1940s as a shaper of its policies before the career capstone of the UN as the icing on his statesman cake. Amos Kendall (1789-1859) - American journalist, political adviser and philanthropist. Outer: From a family that has emigrated from England a century and a half before he was born. The extended clan were prominent landowners. Sixth child out of 12, with many of those following him not surviving. Raised in a relatively puritanical environment, by a controlling progenitor. Worked long hours on his father’s farm, while attending free public schools. Headed his class at Dartmouth College in 1811, where he learned the most in the school library outside the classroom. Became a controversial figure by trying to ban drinking at school, eliciting the anger of his fellow students, which showed him not to impose his moral values on others. Admired by his fellow students by the time of his graduation, he studied law for two years, before becoming a tutor for the children of Henry Clay (Hubert Humphrey) in Kentucky for a year, while the former’s wife, Lucretia Clay, schooled him on the social skills he lacked. Stayed in the state, while converting to the Baptist faith, before moving to Washington, D.C. In 1815, he purchased a half-interest in the Georgetown Minerva, while also becoming postmaster, which gave him instant access to the news. In 1816, he moved to Frankfort, Kentucky and became part-owner and editor of the Argue of Western America, showing himself to be a gifted journalist. In 1818, he wed Mary Woolfolk. Two daughters and a son, as well as a still-born from the union, which ended with his wife’s death in 1823. In 1826, he wed Jane Kyle, who was two decades his junior. Four sons and seven daughters from the union. Worked for the election of Andrew Jackson (Joschka Fischer) in 1828, then went to Washington after his win to become auditor of the Treasury, as well as an intimate adviser of the president, and part of his “kitchen cabinet.” Wrote most of his annual addresses and produced much of the newspaper material that supported Jacksonian Democracy. Made postmaster general in 1834, holding that office through the next administration of Martin van Buren (Gerhard Schroeder). Founded an unsuccessful paper, Kendall’s Expositor and wound up in debt over litigation with mail contractors. Found guilty of refusal to pay his debts, although was exonerated on appeal to the Supreme Court. Made a business manager by inventor Samuel F.B. Morse (Buckminster Fuller) and along with him, earned a fortune over the latter’s newly invented telegraph. Retired in 1860, to become a philanthropist, helping to found the relatively progressive Calvary Baptist Church in 1863, after his previous church refused to pray for Union forces. Two years later, he founded Gallaudet Univ. in Washington, the first school for students with hearing disabilities. Extremely pious towards life’s end, with great concern over his immortal soul. Suffered from a digestive illness, and became bedridden, ultimately dying of what was believed to be cancer of the liver and stomach. Died in great pain, at his home. Inner: Shy and withdrawn, albeit a natural communicator with a sharp intelligence and a desire to improve and uplift all with whom he came into contact. Do-gooder lifetime of establishing journalistic precedents before ultimately devoting his time and energy to heal spiritual wounds and help the hearing impaired to expand their educational lot.


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PATHWAY OF THE POLITICIAN AS LIBERAL BUGBEAR & UNION-BUSTER:
Storyline: The former industrious industrialist enters the political sphere to give added impetus to his need for both control and authority, as he sets his sights on the ultimate position of power in the U.S., its presidency.

Scott Walker (1967) - American politician. Outer: Of Welsh, German, English, Irish and Scottish ancestry with a touch of Bohemian. Born just outside the U.S. Air Force Academy. Father was a Baptist minister, mother was a bookkeeper. Older of two brothers. At 7, he formed a “Jesus USA” club, an admixture of patriotism and Baptist belief. In 1977, the family moved to Wisconsin. Active in sports, band, church and the Boy Scouts, rising to Eagle Scout, while also being selected for a two week training program at Boys Nation in Washington, which inspired his political interests. Worked on the successful GOP gubernatorial campaign of Tommy Thompson, who became the state’s longest serving chief executive. Went to Marquette Univ., a Jesuit school in Milwaukee and while there, worked for the Milwaukee Metro Office of IBM, selling computer warranties, while also becoming involved in an impeachment of student leaders, which earned him the enmity of many. Some question remains as to why he left one semester short of a degree, after losing as student body president in a hotly contested race with a liberal opponent. Bothered by the loss, although it humbled him and according to him, made him a better person. Ran for a state seat in 1990, which he lost, which probably also fed into his deciding to devote full-time to his career. After dropping out, a decision he would later regret, he worked full-time at the Greater Milwaukee Chapter of the American Red Cross in the arena of financial development and fund-raising. Decided to run for an open seat in the State Assembly in 1993, winning a special election as a representative of the City of Waywatosa, running on a pro-life, tough on crime, fiscal conservative platform, and wound up being re-elected four times. At the same time, he married Tonette Tarantino, a widow a dozen years older than he and raised a Catholic although she converted to his religion. Two sons from the union. Served as chair of several committees, and was a key legislator in ending the statute of limitations on sexual assault cases. In 2002, he led the reform movement after a pension scandal, and was elected a Milwaukee County executive to replace the man he helped oust. Won another four year term in 2008, as the only Republican to hold the heavily-Democratic area office. Dropped out of the gubernatorial race that year, citing a lack of campaign funds, but two years later, won the state office, promising tax cuts for small businesses, although critics felt he was only helping the wealthy. Turned down a high-speed railroad line, while supporting abstinence only sex-education and opposing all abortions, even in cases of rape and incest. Totally opposed to gay marriage, as well. After his election, he introduced a budget repair plan that limited collective bargaining powers for most public employees, stripping them of almost their rights and power. A recall effort was launched in 2012 and he became the only governor in the U.S. ever to win a recall bid against him. Handily won re-election for a second term two years later, thanks to an infusion of money from conservative donors, as he became a bugbear for liberals and the whole union movement. Tried to implement a Voter ID law, but it was struck down in court as a violation of the Voting Rights Act. Defunded Planned Parenthood, and refused to consider right-to-work legislation, before reversing his position. A favorite of Alec, or the American Legislative Council, which arranges hook-ups twixt legislators and major US corporations, in order to secretly pass business-friendly measures. Announced his candidacy as the second to last of a long list in July of 2015 and immediately vaulted to number three in the polls, as a favorite of hard-liners, for his total lack of compassion for the poor and ordinary workers, as well as his profoundly pro-big business stances. Nevertheless, ran an extremely lackluster campaign, and by the second round of debates in September was counted out by many as totally irrelevant and a loser. Soon afterwards, he dropped out of the race, having shown little instinct for the nitty-gritty of presidential politics, despite claiming he had entered the race on divine authority. Had his auto-hagiography, “Unintimidated: A Governor’s Story and a Nation’s Challenge,” ghost-written. Inner: Self-aggrandizing and a magnet for controversy, eliciting strong reactions from both his supporters and critics. Domineering authoritarian personality, with the ability to evade the corruption charges that have nailed some of his underlings. Has given back his gubernatorial salary several times and remains deeply in credit card debt, so that his net worth is lowest of all his fellow contenders, -$72,500. Controversialist lifetime of exemplifying the extremes of public life, as a highly controlling authoritarian with the ultimate goal of being the single hand upon the tiller of the Uniter States. Walter Chrysler (Walter Percy Chrysler) (1875-1940) - American industrialist. Outer: Of German and Dutch ancestry on his paternal side, and German on his maternal, with the original family name Greisler. Father was a Canadian immigrant who moved to Kansas as a boy and ran away from home to become a drummer in the Civil War before becoming an engineer for the Union Pacific Railroad. Third of four children, with one sibling dying in infancy. Raised a Methodist and had a typical childhood of the time, with the ideal of thrift deeply ingrained within him. Did various odd jobs as a youth including farm hand and silverware salesman, as well as selling milk from door-to-door. At 17, he became an apprentice at the Union Pacific shops earning 5¢ an hour, despite his sire’s initial objection. A fast learner, he won his journey-man’s certificate before working as a machinist in several Mid-western railroad shops, as he restlessly roamed the west, sometimes hopping freight care to do so. Rose steadily and by 33, he was the superintendent of the Chicago and Great Western Railroad System. In 1901, he married Della Viola Forker, his childhood sweetheart, two daughters and two sons from the union. Began to notice automobiles on the streets of his Iowa town. Borrowed more than $4000 to purchase a $5k Locomobile he saw at an auto show. Bringing it home, he took it apart and put it back together several times to see how it was constructed. In 1910, he took a job as works manager of the American Locomotive Company, and two years later, he was persuaded to take the same position at Buick in Flint, Michigan at a salary cut. Reorganized it into efficient units, introducing the assembly line method of production, which vastly increased output. In 1916, he was appointed president of Buick at a salary of half a million dollars a year, by the president of General Motors, William Durant, although he chafed under his leadership, and resigned, planning to retire. Instead, he was convinced by Chase National Bank to rescue Wlllys-Overland from bankruptcy, and with the help of three engineers, produced his first eponymous car, the Chrysler in 1925. The company quickly grew, and after buying the Dodge Bros. manufacturing company, Chrysler Corp. became the 2nd largest auto manufacturing company in the world, and one of the U.S.’s big three along with Ford and General Motors. In 1928, he financed the construction of the Art-Deco style Chrysler Building in NYC, which would briefly hold the title at the world’s tallest building until superseded by the Empire State Building, although it would retain the title of being the tallest steel-supported brick building. Named Time magazine’s “Man of the Year” in 1928. Penned a serialized autobiography, “The Life of an American Workman,” which was published in 1937. Miscalculated in 1934 with the “Airflow” a model that never caught on, and almost brought the company to its knees financially. Also was hostile to the United Auto Workers Union, which organized in 1937, and wound up sponsoring a long and bitter strike in 1939. Served as President of his company until 1935, and continued to be Chairman of the Board, while retiring to the Long Island estate he had bought in 1923. Lost his wife two years before his own death, and never recovered from the devastating effect it had on him. Suffered a stroke and finally died of a cerebral hemorrhage. Buried in an elaborate columned mausoleum in Westchester County, NY. Had a net worth of some $150,000,000 at the time of his death, although his prime motivation was technological advance rather than money. Inner: Had an explosive temper, although he knew how to elicit what he wanted from the people who worked for him. Adroit with new technologies, with an absorptive mind, and the ability to impress those above him. Controlling and authoritarian. A Freemason who felt the real secret to success was enthusiasm. Hard-charging lifetime of recognizing opportunity wherever he saw it, as a dynamo industrialist who took on the new technologies of transportation as the heart and soul of his existence.


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PATHWAY OF THE POLITICIAN AS CONTROVERSIALIST POPULIST:
Storyline: The hard-core Christian conservative finds his following from the socially chafed and choleric who share his firebrand vision of America as a nation that needs to re-embrace its biblical roots.

Ted Cruz (Rafael Edward Cruz) (1970) - Canadian/American politician. Outer: Of Cuban descent on his paternal side and Irish and Italian on his maternal side. Mother was the first in his family to go to college and became an early computer programmer. Father, Rafael Cruz, fled Cuba in 1957, after being jailed under Fulgencio Batista for fighting his dictatorial regime. Initially thought Fidel Castro was the island’s savior, then was horrified he was a communist. The senior Cruz had two daughters from a previous union when he married, and the couple were working in the oil business in Calgary, Canade when their only son. They subsequently split up shortly after the junior Cruz’s birth, than separately moved to Houston and reconciled before officially divorcing. In the interim, the senior Cruz had a religious awakening and became a charismatic pastor, with the philosophy, “It’s time we stop being politically correct and start being biblically correct.” Went to a Baptist high schools in Texas, where his speaking abilities were duly noted then received his BA in Public Policy from Princeton Univ., graduating cum laude in 1992, while also showing himself to be a skilled debater, winning awards for his speaking skills. 5’11”, with brown hair and brown eyes and a protruding lunar shaped chin. Got his law degree at Harvard Law in 1995, graduating magna cum laude and serving as a primary editor of the Harvard Law Review, as well as a founding editor of the Harvard Latino Law Review, both impressing some and polarizing others with his gift for controversial stances and verbal pyrotechnics. Served as a law clerk to the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court in 1996, the first Hispanic to do so, then took a position with a large D.C. law firm, before joining the George W. Bush Republican presidential campaign in 1999. Met his future wife there, while playing a key strategic role in helping engineer his contested win over Al Gore. In 2000, he married Heidi Suzanne Nelson, the daughter of Seventh Day Adventist missionaries who did dental work in various Third World countries. She in turn ultimately became a managing director of an investment banking firm. Two daughters from the union. Held various national governmental bureaucratic posts in Washington, then became Solicitor General of Texas in 2003, the youngest in the nation, while also winding up as the longest-serving in the state’s his/story, arguing nine cases before the Supreme Court and winning five of them. At the same time, he was an adjunct law professor at the Univ. of Texas. Spent five years as a partner of one of the nation’s largest law firms in Houston, representing corporate clients. In 2012, he was elected junior Republican senator from Texas, the first half-Hispanic to win that electoral honor, after pulling off a huge upset in the primaries, then winning by a comfortable plurality. Proved to be a champion of right-wing causes, from anti-gun control to anti-marriage equality to anti-universal health care to anti-big government, to pro-Israel, pro-life, and pro-biblical tenets. A climate change questioner, and global warming denier, he has also expressed a desire to abolish the IRS, and substitute one flat tax in its stead. An active legislator, sponsoring a host of bills, while serving on armed services and judiciary subcommittees. In 2013, his father claimed he was anointed by God as a king, an assertion he never denied Briefly forced a governmental shutdown later that annum over Obamacare, and the following year formally renounced his Canadian citizenship. Both an isolationist and interventionist with a bomb-‘em-back-to-the-Stone Age view of America’s perceived enemies, such as Iran, and a continual critic of all of Barack Obama’s policies. Announced his intention to run for the presidency at Liberty Univ., an evangelical institution where the students were given no liberty about attending his speechifying with fines imposed on all who did not show up. The victim of mischief-making by on-line activists, they keyed in his various [ptemtoa; domain names to programs he has opposed. Nevertheless, he was able to raise $4 million his first week through strong support by the ultra-right and evangelical communities, as a voice directly reflecting their concerns. Following the Supreme Court’s decision on marriage equality for all Americans regardless of their sexual orientation, he introduced a constitutional amendment to give state legislatures the power to define legal unions solely on the basis of heterosexual relationships, while stripping the federal courts of their ability to officially decide otherwise. Closely allied himself with Donald Trump in all the latter’s pronouncements, with the hope, perhaps, he would be his vice-presidential nominee, should the latter capture the nomination. Also showed himself to be a huge favorite of the Value Voters Conservative Christian crowd, easily winning their endorsement over all other candidates. Ascribes his and Trump’s popularity to a volcanic rage endemic among Republican voters, and has placed himself in a position to pick up both Trump and Carson supporters should they fall from primary grace. Subsequently won the Iowa caucus, in the opening 2016 round, thanks to a good organization and a message that resonated with its most conservative evangelical voters. Continually caught in little lies, while winning three states on Super Tuesday, including his own, Texas, although was beaten everywhere by Trump on the second Super Tuesday. Nevertheless, remained competitive in subsequent primaries, as the two engaged in a continual sleaze campaign to undermine the other. A weak showing in NY, however, saw Trump once again solidly trump him, and get back on track for the nomination. In a last ditch attempt to derail the front runner, he named Carly Fiorina as his VP pick, only to suspend his campaign shortly afterwards, following a substantial May loss in the Indiana primary, because of mounting debt. Because of insults to his family, he refused to endorse Trump after he won the nomination at the RNC, asking his fellow Republicans to “vote their conscience,” which elicited a loud round of boos, as his wife had to be escorted out of the hall. Probably wound up ending his elective political career through the move, after having been suckered into playing the bad guy to Trump’s good guy, enhancing his contentious opponent’s larger standing at the cost of his own. Eventually, however, he was forced to endorse Trump, probably because of pressure put on him by the money people behind the Republicans under threat of never receiving a penny from them again. Introduced a constitutional amendment afterwards to limit senators to two terms and representatives to three as a means of ending cronyism in Congress. During the Trumpcare debates, he pushed an amendment that would offer cheaper bare bones requirements although critics fear it would attract younger, healthier people and make older ones pay higher premiums. Blamed a staffer for his official Twitter account liking a hardcore porn video earlier this week, defended the right to own sex toys and said the media and the left were “obsessed with sex.” Has a net worth of 3.5 million. Inner: Brilliant expositor with reactionary sensibilities and an extremely strong sense of Biblical right and wrnng, with absolutely no willingness to compromise his views. Roundly disliked in the Senate for his independent ways. Odd combination of keen legal intellect, strong verbal skills and a refusal to acknowledge 21st century social, cultural and environmental issues per a desire to make ancient biblical verities the law of the land. Feels far too many non-Christians are effecting the course of the U.S. Understands the importance of framing his narratives to reach those who embrace his ideals. Strong believer in the rapture and the coming of End Times, eagerly awaiting the apocalypse and the return of the prophet Jesus. Cruz missile and missal lifetime of taking his game up to the next level as a potential guide and leader of an exceptionalist America cast in his ideal as a Christian nation, with little tolerance for those who do not share his views. Theodore Bilbo (1877-1947) - American politician. Outer: Of Scottish-Irish descent. Father was a farmer and Confederate vet, who ultimately became a bank president. Won a scholarship to Peabody Normal College in Nashville then went to Vanderbilt law school, although did not receive a degree from either. 5’2” and bespectacled. Married Lillian S. Herrington in 1898, who died the following annum, one daughter from the union. As a student he taught school and worked at a drug store, while being accused of cheating, although he was never formally charged. Passed the bar in Tennessee in 1906, and opened a law practice in Mississippi the following year. Known as “The Man” by both friends and foes alike during his subsequent forty year public career. In 1903, he married Linda Gaddy Bedgood, who served as his active assistant, and lived to 100. Lost his first political race in 1903 to a one-armed Confederate veteran, then racked up succeeding victories in most but not all of his subsequent contests, played to the needs of poor white farmers and workers, as an out-and-out segregationist, who felt blacks were less than human. Served as a state senator from 1908 to 1912, during which time he admitted to taking a bribe, although the senate fell short one vote of expelling him. Served as lieutenant governor from 1912 to 1916, and had a resolution removed from the records calling him “unfit to sit with honest men.” Achieved the governor’s chair in 1916, and followed a populist agenda, much like Huey Long (Joschka Fischer) would in neighboring Louisiana in the 1930s, although lost two years later for U.S. Congress. After his first term as governor, he was defeated for a second in 1923, but came back to re-win another four year term in 1928. Left the state broke and in debt, while continually miring himself in controversies. Lost another bid for the U.S. Congress in 1932, then capped his public career with the Mississippi Senate seat from 1935 until his death in 1947. Very much interested in taking control of the state’s education system, and improve it according to his standards. Wound up dismissing a pair of college presidents and a host of their faculty members in his desire to upgrade the state’s educational system. Continually advocated reforms while race-baiting, and was a supporter of the Democratic New Deal, as well as the idea of deporting blacks to Liberia to relieve unemployment. Seen by his fellow senators as a blight on their chamber, he was always given short shrift to limit his influence. After his final victory, a group of black WW II vets challenged his win on the grounds that they had not been allowed to vote. The Senate refused to seat him, but he died before the issue could be resolved. In 1947, he published “Your Choice: Separation or Mongrelization,” in which he stated that the black volcano had to be removed from white American soil. Suffered from cancer of the mouth, and ultimately passed on from heart failure. His house burned down the year he died. Made his final exit in a hospital, and his funeral attracted 5000 mourners. A bronze statue of him was placed in the state capitol building although it was later relocated to a room used by the legislature’s Black Caucus, many of whom have employed its outstretched arms as a coat rack. Inner: Seen as a demagogue by many, thanks to an inflammatory style, and scathing rhetoric. Liked flashy clothing and referring to himself in the third person. Active member of the KKK, and a continual courter of controversy. Debit to his race lifetime of giving voice to the fears and loathings of his times, as a grotesque gadfly constantly looking to drag political discourse down to his debased view of how things should be. Theodorick Bland (1741-1790) - American doctor, soldier and politician. Outer: Descendant of Pocahontas (Halle Berry) on his mother’s side. Second cousin of Thomas Jefferson (Saul Williams). From a wealthy family of slave-owning planters and politicians, with an uncle a Continental Congressman. The only son, with five sisters. Sent to England at 12, where he received a classical education, before gaining his M.D. in Edinburgh in 1763, in response to the poor health he suffered most of his life. Returned home to be a practicing physician until the late 1760s, at which time he came into his inheritance and became a planter and major slaveholder, while also dipping into politics. Married Martha Dangerfield in 1769, no children from the union. At the outbreak of the American Revolution, he became a captain of the Virginia Cavalry, although was never much of a soldier, with some blaming the colonial army’s defeat at Brandywine in 1777 on his poor scouting reports. Retired from the military in 1789, and briefly commanded a prisoner-of-war post. Served as a member of the Continental Congress from 1780 to 1783, and the state house of Delegates in Virginia from 1786 to 1788. When called on to ratify the Federal Constitution, he was among the minority who opposed it, feeling it gave far too much power to the central government. Won election to the new U.S. House of Representative as an anti-Administration candidate, and served for 15 months, before dying in office, the first congressman to do so. Eventually interred in the Congressional Cemetery in Washington. His wife would marry twice more, outliving him by 14 years. Inner: Strong advocate of states rights, and limited central government. Established views he would continue to hold in subsequent go-rounds in this series, reflecting the various environments in which he was raised. Unapologetic slave owner, and strong individualist. Learning curve lifetime of dealing with a weak body during a time of great upheaval, as part of his ongoing education in the dynamics of democracy and his unique controversialist place in its halls of power.


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PATHWAY OF THE POLITICIAN AS GREAT LATINO HOPE:
Storyline: The canny cuate positions himself for another run for the presidential roses as a fast-track ethnic minority, with a back-up twin-in-hand, to help him take full advantage of changing American demographics and his own progressive political instincts.

Julian Castro (1974) - American politician. Outer: Born out of wedlock to Rosie Castro, a headline-grabbing 1970s firebrand who was one of the leaders of La Raza Unida, a Texas civil rights group dedicated to defending Mexican-Americans and promoting Chicano identity. Father, Jesse Guzman, was a community organizer turned teacher, who rarely appears in his sons’ biographies. One of a pair of identical twins, with his brother Joaquin, both of whom were raised with high expectations of leadership as “los cuates,” or the twins. The siblings played on their high school tennis team, earned top grades, and were given a dynamic political education by their fiery mother, replete with meeting key figures in their ethnic political world, while she helped build San Antonio’s west-side barrio political machine. Along with his brother, went to Stanford Univ. through affirmative action, and was a communications and political science major. Served as a White House intern in 1994. After Joaquin was rejected by Yale Law School, both brothers went to Harvard Law, where he was a member of Alianza and served on the Law School Council. In 2001, he immediately entered politics and won a seat on the City Council, which his mother had failed to gain nearly thirty years earlier. The following annum, his brother was elected to the Texas State House of Representatives. Both siblings, who are Democrats, also pursued law careers with a major firm with offices around the world. A successful suit in a drunk driving case gave each the wherewithal to pursue far lesser paying political careers. Lost in his first bid for mayor of San Antonio in 2005, largely through the shadow his mother’s past cast over his present, when he insisted he was far more than a barrio candidate. In 2007, he married Erica Lira, a consultant to math teachers, after a long engagement. One daughter from the union. Elected mayor on his second try in 2009, and became the first of his office to be grand marshal of the annual gay rights parade. Continually expressing views outside city affairs, showing an obvious interest in becoming a national figure, with measured liberal responses to most issues. Surrounded himself with a high power staff, even though his job is subsumed by a city manager, while his larger eye remains on the steppingstone of governor of Texas. As keynote speaker at the 2012 Democrtatic convention, he introduced himself to the nation in rousing manner with his immigrant story then tore into Mitt Romney, making himself a potential national figure, in presidential elections to come. Made head of HUD by Obama in 2014, throwing him into the Washington maelstrom, as part of his own route to the White House. Inner: Doesn’t really speak Spanish, studying Latin and Japanese in school, while his mother always spoke to him in English. Far more the pragmatist than the ideologue, and fiercely competitive, with a genuine desire to change things. Despite his mother’s disdain for the Alamo, supports it as a tourist attraction. Fast track lifetime of heading for the presidency once again, from a minority ethnic root, and a life bathed in the political from the beginning in order to help him realize a longtime fascination with both power and the power of communication and to what ultimate ends he can take both. James M. Cox (1870-1957) - American politician. Outer: Parents were both farmers. Youngest of 7 children, and farm-raised. A high school graduate, he taught at his alma mater for six years, beginning in 1886. Short, stocky and bespectacled. Through a brother-in-law who was publisher of the Middletown Weekly Signal, he became involved in newspaper work, first as a newsboy, then copy reader, before moving to the Cincinnati Inquirer, showing himself to be an enterprising reporter. In 1894, after exposing a railroad’s magnate shady business deals, he was asked to leave and became a personal assistant to Paul Song, a former robber baron who was elected to Congress. With the latter’s financial help, he bought the Dayton Daily News in 1898, a failed enterprise which he turned around by involving himself in every aspect of the paper from editor to business manager. Plugged into the AP wire service, solicited female readership and steadily expanded its circulation into outlying districts, while updating the press technology, so that within two years he had bought out his investors. The same year he wed Mayme Simpson Harding, and the duo had a pair of sons before divorcing in 1911. Added to his newspaper stable, and became quite wealthy, before opting for politics as a progressive Democrat in 1909, initially as a Congressman, where his record was largely undistinguished, and then as governor of Ohio, from 1913 1921, serving three terms, while losing in a 1916 reelection bid. An enthusiastic and well-liked reformer, he began the state’s highway system, put restrictions on child labor and also created the state’s worker compensation program. Married Margaretta Parler Blair, who was some 20 years his junior, in 1917, two daughters from the union. In 1920, he became the Democratic candidate for president, with Franklin D. Roosevelt as his running-mate, although the country was looking for a party change after 8 years of Woodrow Wilson (Michael Eric Dyson) and he lost in a landslide to fellow Ohioan Warren G. Harding (Warren Beatty), who was his political inferior. Spent the rest of his life expanding his newspaper empire, including the prestigious Atlanta Constitution, while also adding radio stations to the mix, which would be continued by his sons and daughters as a media conglomerate known as Cox Enterprises. Refused to run front page stories on the 1929 stock market crash, feeling public confidence outstripped truth-telling. Proved to be a caring boss, granting unlimited sick leave, while never losing interest in the daily business of editing and running a paper. Remained active in Democratic politics and died at home after a series of strokes. In his will he stated his newspapers should remain devoted to working people. Penned his memoirs, “Journey Through My Years,” in 1946. Inner: Workaholic, with a great concern for commonality. Progressive, highly detailed-oriented, and pragmatic, with a strong moral sense. Avid baseball fan and ardent golfer, as well as an inveterate reader, with biographies a favorite. Said if he reincarnated, it would be into the aroma of printer’s ink. Newsworthy lifetime of bringing his probity to bear in two realms not known for them, the media and politics, in his continuing exploration of the larger and smaller temperaments of his times in order to find his proper place in them. Silas Wright, Jr. (1795-1847) - American politician. Outer: Born on the family farm, and at one moved to Vermont where he grew up on another farm. 5th child, raised a Presbyterian. Father was a member of the state legislature. Taught school in between taking classes at Middlebury Academy, then read for the law and moved to NYC. In 1813, he married Clarissa Moody, the daughter of an old family friend, although her innate shyness made the limelight extremely difficult for her, creating social mishaps galore as a public couple. No children from the union. Admitted to the bar in 1819, before establishing his practice in Canton, NY, where he would settle. Made friends with Martin Van Buren (FDR), who would serve as his political mentor after the two initially scuffled on a steamboat, causing the latter to fall overboard. Along with Van Buren, he became a member of the Albany Regency, whose fellow Democratic politicos, William Marcy (Antonio Villaraigosa) and Charles Dudley (Bill Richardson), would continue to parallel one another in American politics in centuries to come, in their coveting of the presidency and in their ethnic backgrounds as a crypto-brotherhood of sorts. Served in several positions before being elected to the NY Senate in 1823. Less the ideologue than the pragmatist, he followed the political lines created by his cohorts, and with them, was to blame for their loss of the legislature, although more maneuvering regained it for them. Became a brigadier general in the state militia and served in the U.S. House of Reps from 1827 to 1829, while supporting Andrew Jackson (Joschka Fischer) for the presidency, which almost cost him his seat, since the latter was unpopular in his district. Van Buren won the governorship of NY in 1828, and he was awarded the position of State Controller, after turning down a senate seat in favor of the more lucrative position. Fought corruption, which enhanced his reputation, and when Van Buren became vice-president, he reluctantly accepted a senate seat, replacing the resigned Marcy, although proved somewhat indecisive as such, while showing himself to be alternately progressive and conservative on both social and financial issues. As a product of his age, he was a heavy drinker, with a frequently florid complexion, although he was never impaired by his imbibing, even though it did eventually affect his health. Reelected to the Senate in 1837, where he served as chair of the Finance Committee. Offered the vice-presidential nomination in 1844, but declined in order to run for governor of NY, and served from 1845 to 1846, before being defeated for reelection. Retired to his farm afterwards, which he proudly cultivated himself, and died soon afterwards of a heart attack while picking up his mail. Appeared on the U.S. $50 gold certificate for thirty years. Inner: Known for his probity and honesty, as well as his clear-headedness and party loyalty. Felt people needed the leadership of bosses. Group lifetime of coming in with his longtime crypto-brotherhood as an ongoing member of a liberal political faction that would reflect one another over the next two centuries of American public life.

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