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SHOW BUSINESS - ACTORS - 1940s-1950s

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS RESURRECTED HEART/THROB:
Storyline: The celluloid sheik makes several early exits to sensational effect, before finding his true high-flying self through retreat and self-examination, and angelically resurrects to enjoy full maturity, only to be beset by further unintegrated elements of his character.

vJohn Travolta (John Joseph Travolta) (1955) - American actor, producer and director. Outer: Of Italian/Irish descent. Father was a former semipro football player who co-owned a tire store. Mother was an actress and drama teacher. Youngest of 6 children, all of whom entered show business. Fascinated with flying from the age of 5 onward. Close family, his sire built a miniature stage in the basement, where the kids could put on shows. Found his parents to be completely supportive of his decision to drop out of high school to pursue an acting career in NYC. Did off-Broadway, commercials, and toured with Broadway musicals, before going to Hollywood and working in TV there. His initial breakthrough was as Vinnie Barbarino on the 1975 hit comedy series, “Welcome Back, Kotter.” 6’, and blue-eyed with dark brown hair. Became deeply involved at 22 with a 40 year-old actress, Diana Hyland, who died in his arms of breast cancer a year later. Extremely wary of the press afterwards because of its sensationalism over his loss and began withdrawing, despite a trio of film successes, particularly the lead in Saturday Night Fever, where he demonstrated his dancing skills. Also a singer, releasing several albums early in his career. After his mother died of cancer during this period, he moved to an isolated ranch near Santa Barbara, and pursued flying, traveling and broadening himself by himself. His next dozen pictures were all failures, while he turned down numerous roles in films destined for success, and was written off by Hollywood as a has-been by his early 30s. Sold his ranch and moved to Florida, where he designed a house there, and at 37 married one of his former costars, Kelly Preston, son and daughter from union, including Ella Bleu, a budding actress. When his son Jett turned two, he became subject to seizures, which were attributed to an arterial affliction called Kawasaki disease, despite no official medical connection between the two. Closely monitored Jett’s health, never leaving him alone, with a permanent nanny in constant attendance. Despite one modest success, his career stood at a standstill until his turn as a hit man in Quentin Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction in his late 30s, after which he reemerged as one of Hollywood’s most popular leads in a series of hits, including the grubby, but angelic Michael, and the tellingly titled Resurrection. Discovered on meeting Tarantino that he used to live in his apartment during his early career. In 1975, he became interested in Scientology, a controversial behavioral reprogramming system, for which he would credit the ultimate turnaround in his life. Because of his celebrity status, he became one of its best-known advocates, and has maintained his close ties with its teachings. At century’s turn he produced and starred in Battlefield Earth, based on one of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard’s works, but it wound up winning a Razzie as one of 2000’s worst films, and failed to garner any kind of audience. Owns 5 jets, and has a full-time copilot working for him. Continually on screen, thanks to his choice of scripts, and his rekindled superstardom, as well as his ability to bounce back from failures. Added female impersonation to his c.v. with Hairspray in 2007, reprising the role of Edna Turnblad first made famous by the drag queen Divine two decades earlier. In 2009, he lost his son Jett when he banged his head on a bathroom fixture in a seizure, at their vacation home in the Bahamas. Completely devastated by the loss to the point of being unable to attend the cremation, he had earlier refused to acknowledge his son might be autistic, since Scientology denied mental disorders, and therefore never gave him the medication that might have altered his ultimate course. His virtually mute scion, who spent most of his time playing video games, gave all indications of suffering from that condition, leaving his father in a painful state of denial with which he will have to wrestle the rest of his life. On top of all his guilt about not being there for his son at the end, he also had to weather a subsequent extortion plot by local Bahamians. Ballooned afterwards, while questioning Scientology precepts for the very first time, much to the latter group’s extreme discomfort, because of his open checkbook with them, and his status as an Operating Thetan VII, just below the highest position in the Church. Eventually, he was able to begin the healing process through a combination of work, good works, and a reaffirmation of his deeply held religious beliefs. Had a healthy son in 2010, in recompense for his previous profound loss. Two years later, he suddenly became the subject of lawsuits from a variety of young men around his aggressive sexual behavior, after years of rumors of his bisexuality, which runs totally counter to Scientological tenets, in what seems to be a further crypto--need on his part to publicly deal with more of his demons. Has a net worth of over $150 million. Inner: Friendly, goodhearted, optimistic, generous, enthusiastic gourmand, extremely family-oriented. Nocturnal, with a strong risk factor in all he assays professionally. Hearty appetite, with the capability of ballooning to huge proportions. Sensitive, empathetic, with a surety over his skills, and a desire to continually create and recreate himself. Desire to be a pop icon who survives, in an unconscious nod to his earlier flameouts. Back from the self-styled grave lifetime of literally resurrecting through a deep-seated belief in himself and his abilities, with the solid base of loving parents and a loving family behind him, only to suffer intimate losses as reflection of his earlier propensity for premature exits. vRudolph Valentino (Rodolofo Alfonzo Raffaelo Pierre Filbert Guglielmi di Valentina d’Antonguollo) (1895-1926) - Italian/American actor. Outer: Father was an army veterinarian. Sent to military school at 13, but was turned down as officer material. After a further rejection by the Naval Academy, because his chest size was an inch too small, he studied agriculture at the Royal Academy of Agriculture, but found it unsatisfactory and went from Italy to Paris at 17, only to wind up begging on street-corners. 5’11, 156lbs., with dark brown hair and eyes. Emigrated to NYC the following year, speaking no English and lived with Italian immigrants while working as a landscape gardener. Fired and took odd jobs, but was booked several times for petty theft and blackmail. Became a taxi dancer, before taking his skill to nightclubs and dance halls. Arrested again, he was released through the efforts of actress Alla Nazimova (Anna Paquin), and left NY with a traveling troupe that folded in Utah. Made his way to San Francisco, where he continued as a dancer, before finally arriving in Hollywood in his early 20s. Began his career in silents with Alimony in 1918, and continued playing bit parts, often as a villain or a dancer. Married actress Jean Acker, but they never even made it to the marriage bed, when she locked him out of their hotel bridal suite on their wedding night, in a Hollywood record six hour union. The following year, he achieved instant stardom with The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse after being discovered by screenwriter June Mathis (Nora Ephron) who would serve as a mother figure, and ultmately secure a crypt for him right next to her own, so that they would be enjoined eternally. Enjoyed a meteoric rise, as he became the favorite fantasy of women all over America, with his dark good looks, lithe grace and athletic body, as well as his sensual melancholy. Men, on the other hand, viewed him as a powder puff, dismissing him as effeminate. Cemented his reputation with The Sheik, causing women to faint in the aisles at its showing. Wrote a volume of treacly poetry called, “Day Dreams” that further enhanced his reputation with women, but by the middle of the decade, his career began to sag, despite showing some comic talent in addition to his celluloid sexuality, in a desire to to stretch himself as an actor. Contracted another ill-conceived marriage in his late 20s, with actress and set designer Natasha Rambova, who dominated him, controlling his career with ill-chosen roles, as his masculinity came into greater question through his relationship with her. Her continual interference eventually made her absence from the set a condition of his working. Arrested for bigamy when it was discovered he had not officially divorced his first wife. After a comeback, he was lambasted in the Chicago Tribune as a “Pink Powder Puff.” Challenged the anonymous editor to a boxing match, but died a few months later from a perforated ulcer at the age of 31. His last words were reputedly, “Don't pull down the blinds. I feel fine. I want the sunlight to greet me!” Very unhappy and frustrated with the way his life turned out towards the end. On his death, several hysterical women committed suicide, while the streets were lined with female fans for his public funeral, and some 30,000, mostly women, stood in line to view his powdered and puffed remains. Later glorified in death with Valentino cults, as well as by a mysterious female mourner in black, who put flowers on his grave for years on the anniversary of his passing, beginning in 1927. That role would eventually be taken up by others, including, eventually, many who had not even been born at the time of his premature demise. Inner: Charming, ambitious, with a curious dishonesty about himself that was reflected in his early brushes with the law, and the public’s divided view of him along gender lines. Irresponsible and weak-willed, with luxurious tastes. Despite image, never particularly interested in sex, far more of a foodie. Very dark-skinned, took care not to tan, for fear of being labeled negroid. Repeat lifetime of projecting an unintegrated exterior and self-destructing over his alternately hypnotic hold and revulsion by the female and male public. Harry Montague (Harry Mann) (1843-1878) - English/American actor. Outer: Place of birth uncertain, as were details of his childhood. Son of an Anglican clergyman. Began his carer as a secretary to playwright Dion Boucicault (Robert Shaw), then acted for a decade in various London theaters. Emigrated to the U.S. in 1874 and made his debut in Wallack’s theater in “Partners for Life.” Quickly became a huge favorite of female fans. Only a conventional actor, but his handsome, graceful magnetic stage mien was highly appealing to the female members of his audience, particularly since he didn’t use make-up to play his matinee idol self. Associated himself with Lester Wallack (Sting) throughout his American career. Played contemporary roles because of his limited skills, since he did not have the ability to assay more demanding parts. Endeared himself far more for who he was than what he did. Died suddenly from a hemorrhage of the lungs, and was awarded funerals on both coasts. Inner: Charming, handsome, uncomplicated. Part One lifetime of emigrating, achieving heart/throb status as a matinee idol, and then making an early exit stage left to the collective anguish of his adulating female audience.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS DROLL COMMENTATOR:
Storyline: The homespun humorist achieves extraordinary public power through the sheer velocity of his irreverent wit in a pair of legendary go-rounds, before choosing a less visible route doing the same thing, albeit from a more removed perspective.

vArlo Guthrie (Arlo Davy Guthrie) (1947) - American singer/songwriter and comedian. Outer: Son of legendary folk singer Woody Guthrie, who died when he was 10. Mother, Marjorie Greenblatt Mazia, was a dancer and the daughter of Yiddish poet. Grew up among musicians in a busy household, dancing at 3 and playing the harmonica with bluesman Leadbelly (Busta Rhymes). His mother taught him guitar at the age of 6, while his father became less and less of a presence, because of a degenerative disease. Led a bohemian existence punctuated by private schools, and attended college in Montana, but dropped out to pursue a musical career. 6’, and long-haired. Became a regular while still in his teens on the East Coast coffeehouse circuit, and in his early 20s, toured Japan. Produced his debut album the same year, in which his 18 minute musical commentary riff on his incarceration for being a litterbug in "Alice’s Restaurant," became an anti-Vietnam War staple. Married in 1969 to Jackie Hyde, a fellow free spirit, 4 children from the union, all of whom would join and tour with him, as well as have their separate venues. Had a popular career in the 1970s, although seemed indifferent to stardom, and in his early 30s, converted to Catholicism, although maintained his connection to his Judaic root. Became an activist for a variety of causes, including the environment and antinuclear concerns, through the Guthrie Center and Guthrie Foundation, while maintaining a steady, but low profile as a story-telling scold, preferring to be a second tier public personality, rather than the full bore powerhouse of yore, despite spending 10 months a year on the road, while enjoying the intimacy of continual live audiences rather than entertaining at a remove via electronic devices. Eventually registered as a Republican because of a need he felt for a real two-party system. In 2012, he lost his wife of 43 years to cancer. Inner: Good-humored, good-hearted, well-intentioned public prodder. Laid back lifetime of retreating from the mainstream, to pursue his own internal development, while maintaining his ongoing role as droll commentator on his times. vWill Rogers (1879-1935) - American comic. Outer: Of mixed Cherokee Nation and European descent. Father was a successful rancher, politician and banker in the Oklahoma Territory. Youngest of 8 children, with only 4 surviving to adulthood. Learned to ride as soon as he could walk, and became an expert horseman and lasso tosser. Lost his mother at 11. Had a spotty education, preferring mischief to scholarship, and dropped out of a military academy after the 10th grade, becoming a ranch hand. Went to Argentina to work as a gaucho, then South Africa where he trained horses for the upcoming Boer War, before joining a Wild West Circus there as a lasso-spinning cowboy, under the sobriquet of ‘The Roping Fool.’ 5’11”, 180 lbs. Returned to the U.S. in 1904 and continued to display his skills in fairs and on vaudeville stages, saying shyly one night, “Swingin’ a rope’s all right, if your neck ain’t in it,” which got a laugh, and led him to add similar earthy observations to his act. Married Betty Blake, an Arkansas woman in his late 20s, 4 children, with the youngest dying in childhood. The eldest, William Rogers, became a politician and publisher, while also portraying his sire in the movies, and his only daughter, Mary, became a Broadway actress, while his second son, Jim, also did some acting. Developed his own unique persona and was a huge star by his mid-30s, as "the Poet Lariat," mixing homespun philosophy with political jokes. Always prepared himself well, reading local newspapers so as to personalize his show for each audience. His self-styled old country boy’s truisms, coupled with a sly irreverence, struck a very respondent chord, and he became one of the best loved figures America ever produced, operating on the Christ-ian dictum, "I never met a man I didn’t like." Played musical comedy and was a star of the Ziegfeld Follies, as well as numerous silent movie shorts, although they were not his medium, and he lost money on producing and directing them. Began writing in his late 30s, and then in his early 40s, started a newspaper column, which was ultimately read by 40 million highly amused readers, or roughly one/third of the population of the time. With the advent of sound in movies, his popularity escalated, ultimately making him the number one box office attraction of 1934. Declined to run for governor of Oklahoma, although did serve as mayor of Beverly Hills, and proved instrumental in getting Franklin D. Roosevelt elected president in 1932, so great was his personal power. En route from Seattle to the Soviet Union to chart a possible trans-Siberian air route, he was killed along with close friend, one-eyed flyer Wiley Post (Treat Williams), when their plane crashed in Alaska, after running out of fuel. The nation mourned greatly, with some 50,000 filing past his casket, for he had managed to touch the hearts of virtually everyone. At the time his daughter Mary was on stage, playing the role of a daughter whose father had died in a plane crash, when she heard the news, and gave up her acting career soon after. At his death, he was Hollywood’s second favorite star behind Shirley Temple. His same-named son played him in a subsequent biopic of his life. Inner: Friendly, good-hearted and unaffected. Thought of himself primarily as an entertainer, but his sly wit found contemporary politics too tempting a target. Had a bleak view of the world, despite his good humor. Fascination with famous people, although preferred the company of his own kind. Well-loved lifetime of living by true Christian principles to become a man that virtually everyone truly revered, and, more important, listened to. vDavey Crockett (1786-1836) - American frontiersman and politician. Outer: Parents were dirt-poor pioneers. Father had fought in the Revolutionary Wars, 5th son. Grew up on the frontier and received no formal education. Hired out as an indentured servant at 12, then went to work as a farmhand to pay off his sire’s debts. Lost his first love to a man who could read and write, when he could not. Married Polly Finley by his early 20s, 2 sons and a daughter from the union. Became a farmer, but had no great feel for the work. Gained a reputation as a bear hunter, then participated in a brutal retaliatory Amerindian massacre and served as a scout under Andrew Jackson (Joschka Fischer) during the Creek War, but happily relinquished his military role when his 2nd enlistment was up. His wife suddenly died after the birth of their daughter, and he quickly married Elizabeth Patton, a widow, after a brief period of mourning, then moved farther west in Tennessee. Although a poor farmer, he was a highly skilled hunter, and because of his popular personality and ready wit, a magistrate. In his mid-30s, he was elected to the state legislature, thanks to his humorous oratory. Opponents often traveled the stump together, and he once memorized the standard speech of his rival, giving it ahead of him, and leaving him literally speechless. Elected to the House of Representatives in 1827, he went to Washington, D.C. without his family and served twice as a Democrat, with a strong identification with the commonality of Jackson. Became a capitol celebrity, although he failed to get any legislation passed in 3 terms. Unable to compromise, he eventually broke with Jackson, and was defeated by his forces, then returned for one last term as a Whig. Toured the North, as ‘a ba’r-huntin’’ backwoodsman with political savvy, in order to drum up support for the Whig Party against populist Jackson, with the fantasy of possibly running for president. After being defeated in his next election by the president’s forces, he was extremely embittered, finding himself no better off than when he started his political career. Decided to head for Texas in his late 40s with 3 companions to seek his fortune, seeing a place for himself in the new government there. Swore fealty to the impending Republic of Texas and joined its army. Arrived at the Alamo garrison with a dozen men, just in time to join Col. Jim Bowie (Treat Williams) and Col. William B. Travis (Tommy Lee Jones) in its legendary foolhardy defense. Died along with the other 2 in the subsequent massacre there, although controversy remains over the possibility of his surrendering and then being executed. The myth-making surrounding him began during his lifetime as an adjunct to his unusual role as politician/performer, and continued with a series of 50 Davey Crockett almanacs published over the next 2 decades after his death. His coonskin cap image was still popular over a century later, when his legend was resurrected for 1950s TV consumption. Inner: Commonsensical, homespun politician, with a love of performing on the stump. Great mimic and raconteur, but filled with the prejudices of his times, as well as the conventional thinking of commonality. Became the first American to make a living off his own fanciful legend. Far less modest and far more ambitious than he made himself out to be - half horse and half alligator with a touch of snapping turtle. Charming chest-thumping lifetime of trying to intertwine a Christian political sense with his own overweening ambition, and creating a living legend in the process.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS HIGH-FLYING PERFORMER:
Storyline: The precarious pilot has an ineluctable draw towards crash-landings, but is able to ultimately right his craft through a restructuring of his priorities from self-destruction to self-recreation, after numerous go-rounds of opting for the former.

Treat Williams (Richard Treat Williams) (1951) - American actor and pilot. Outer: Of British descent, with a smattering of Dutch. Father was a business executive, got his name from an ancestor on his mother’s side, Robert Treat Payne, who signed the Declaration of Independence. Mother was an antiques dealer. Went to prep school, then graduated from Franklin and Marshall College, then did repertory theater in Pennsylvania. 5’10”, with dark brown hair and blue eyes, as well as rugged, with a strong stage and film presence. Came to NYC and became the understudy of John Travolta in “Grease” on Broadway in 1973. After more Broadway work, he made his film debut in his mid-20s in The Ritz. Took a year off from acting to fly charter flights, until his partner was killed in a crash, as a reflection of his previous demise, and he went back to acting. Seemed as if he were poised for megastardom after playing a policeman-turned-informant in Prince of the City in 1981, but his career stalled in his 30s, and he slipped into cocaine abuse for 6 years, with far more of a desire to party than work. Finally broke his addiction through 7 years of psychoanalysis, and was able to release his need for drug crutches. Pam Van Sant, an actress and producer, in 1988, Son and daughter from the union. Began working again on TV, and did some turns on the New York stage. Had difficulty returning to films, however, since Hollywood had long given him up on him. Through persistence, he finally started his 2nd career in Tinseltown in his early 40s, with Things To Do In Denver When You’re Dead, giving him the opportunity to resurrect himself and enjoy his life and work once again. Returned to off-Broadway in 1999 with "Captains Courageous," and in 2002 began his first TV series, “Everwood,” which lasted for 5 seasons. More series would follow and would prove to be the bulk of his acting work. Continues to fly, feeling himself in control while high in the air, while trying to regain that same sense firmly upon the ground. Inner: Enthusiastic aviator, high-flyer in his personal life. Resuscitated lifetime of unconsciously imitating earlier crashes at the same age, although this time with the potential of complete and healing resurrection, after learning how to rechannel his thirst for adventure into far healthier more constructive outlets. vWiley Post (1899-1935) - American aviator. Outer: Parents were farmers, 4th of 7 children. Disliked schooling, preferred tinkering on his father’s machinery. After his family moved from Texas to Oklahoma, he saw his first airplane at 14 at a county fair and spent most of the day staring at it, then had his first ride in an auto on the way home. At 17, he took a course in an auto school, then worked for a construction company driving and grading, before becoming a tool-dresser and driller in the oil fields. Joined 3 aviators in the early 1920s, and made parachute descents. At 25, he began a new career as a parachutist at country fairs. Also took flying lessons, but had to return to oil drilling. His first day at work, a metal chip hit his left eye, and it had to be removed because of an infection, although it did not curtail his sense of adventure. Wore a jaunty eyepatch. Spent his compensation money in buying an old plane, then eloped with a 17 year old in it to marry in his late 20s. Worked as a pilot, then won a race in the ‘Winnie Mae’ from LA to Chicago in 1930, against America’s best airmen. Made his first round-the-world flight in his early 30s with a navigator and published their account of the trip as “Around the World in Eight Days.” Bought the ‘Winnie Mae’ from his sponsor afterwards. 2 years later, he performed the same feat solo, doing it in under 8 days, while proving the value of navigational instruments. Tried 4 times to navigate the stratosphere, but failed each time. En route from Seattle to the Soviet Union to chart a possible trans-Siberian air route, he was killed along with his close friend, the humorist Will Rogers (Arlo Guthrie), when their plane crashed in Alaska, after running out of fuel. Inner: Energetic, daring and resourceful. Greatly admired for having overcome a disability to perform heroic feats. Stratospheric lifetime of literally giving his left eye for his higher ambitions, before soaring off into fame and ultimate self-annihilation. vJames Bowie (1796-1836) - American frontiersman. Outer: Born in Kentucky, but came to the Missouri frontier with his parents when he was about 4, and then Louisiana 2 years later, where his family became farmers. 8th of 10 children with four brothers and five sisters. Little known of his youth, left home at 18, and did manual labor before joining his siblings in the slave trade as well as sugar planting and lumber. 6’, with an erect carriage. Bought a sugar plantation in Louisiana with one of his brothers. Elected to the state legislature, and also mingled with New Orleans society. Killed a man with his knife, made from a blacksmith’s rasp, in a duel in a sandbar in his early 30s and went to Texas, where he became friendly with the Mexican vice governor. Assumed Mexican citizenship, got extensive land grants, and married Ursula de Veramendi, the daughter of the vice governor in his mid-30s. Became interested in the Texas revolutionary movement, when an influx of thousands of American settlers caused anti-American sentiment in the legislature. Soon became a colonel in the Texas army, after showing his aggressive mettle in several battles. At 40, he joined the garrison at the Alamo under Col. William B. Travis (Tommy Lee Jones). Took command of the volunteers there of a force of some 150 men, but fell sick during the famous seige by the Mexican army, dying on his cot, when the superior numbers of his enemy overtook that stronghold. Although credited with the invention of the Bowie knife, it was probably created by his brother, Rezin. Became a hero through story and legend, along with the other defenders of the Alamo. Inner: Energetic, daring and resourceful. Also quiet and unobtrusive. Great courage, strength and agility. Low-flying lifetime of enjoying the challenges of frontier America, and becoming a living legend in the process.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS WESTERN REALIST:
Storyline: The self-involved early screen legend stubbornly adheres to his own dogged agenda in pursuing the fugitive fantasies of integrity, fame and fortune, and manages to etch himself into the public imagination on each of his action-filled go-rounds.

vTommy Lee Jones (1946) - American actor and filmmaker. Outer: Of British descent with some Scots-Irish. Father was a cowboy who became a specialist in drilling tools while laboring in the oil fields of Texas and the rest of the world. Mother worked as a policewoman and schoolteacher, among other things. 8th generation Texan. His 2nd brother died in infancy, when he was 3. Worked in the fields on school vacations both with and without his father, who died in his mid-50s. Played football, and went to a prestigious Texas prep school in Dallas. Started acting there, seeing it as a good tonic for his imagination, while feeling its craft gave him a sense of well-being. 6’1”, with light brown hair and eyes and large-headed, both literally and figuratively. Majored in English at Harvard, where he continued acting, while also playing on the interior line on the football team. Classmate of Al Gore, with whom he maintained longtime contact. Made his Broadway debut at 23, and entered films the following year, in Love Story, before returning to Broadway for the rest of his 20s. Married Katherine Lardner in 1971, 2 stepchildren from his wife’s previous union. Began forging a screen personality for himself as the convoluted hero or villain in a series of noticeable turns, where his large-headed, compact-bodied intensity often transcended otherwise mediocre material. Divorced and married photojournalist Kimberlea Cloughley in the early 1980s, 2 children from union. Divorced in 1996, and married a third time in 2001. Enjoyed huge success in the 1990s, winning a Best Supporting Actor Oscar in 1993 for his role as a dogged pursuer in The Fugitive, then cemented his status with a turn as a matter-of-fact govt. agent in pursuit of aliens in Men in Black. All told his films of that decade grossed over $1 billion. In the interim, he also wrote and directed a western for TV, unconsciously aping his earlier life in this series, which led to his well-received directorial debut, The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada in 2006, a gritty modern western in which he also starred. Followed it up in 2014, with The Homesman which he also penned, produced and starred in. Although his tale of three pioneer women driven mad by western life garnered good reviews, it failed to find much of an audience. Has a net worth of $85 million. Inner: Great love for his craft, allowing it to give him a deep, confident sense of self. Self-involved in extremis, yet always capable of intelligent, unique performances. Dogged pursuer lifetime of trying to extend his grasp on the public imagination beyond the rut he had dug for himself earlier in this series. vWilliam S. Hart (1870-1946) - American actor. Outer: Father was an itinerant laborer, taking his family with him around the country. Close to sister, May Ellen. Spent a lot of his childhood in the West, developing a great love for both the landscape and the lifestyle. 6’1”, 180 lbs. Returned to NYC in his late teens and became a postal clerk, although soon began to train for the stage, and made his debut as an actor in his mid-20s, ultimately gaining a reputation for his Shakespearean roles, and winning popular success for a series of western dramas. Did not make his screen debut until his late 40s, when he began working for director Thomas Ince (Sam Peckinpah), who specialized in westerns. Initially played villains, but eventually traded in his black hat for a white one, and began directing his own films, as well as starring in and writing them. Took a long time before he realized he was being exploited by Ince. Because of his direct experience with the West as a youth, he insisted on authenticity, slowing down the melodramatics of the time in order to give a true depiction of a world he intimately remembered. Eschewing the Hollywoodized West, he insisted on realistic costumes, stories and sets, as well as complex heroes, who had both good and bad in them, although were ultimately redeemed by their heroic acts when the last reel ended. Shot many of his films on his ranch, La Loma de los Vientos, ‘Hill of the Winds,’ and did his own riding and stunts. Rarely smiling, and sitting atop his pony Fritz, his West was peopled by dusty characters facing gritty problems in tumble-down housing in a decidedly unromantic milieu. Had the odd habit of proposing to his leading ladies, briefly marrying one of them, Winifred Westover, in 1921, when he was 58 and she 21. Separated several months later and formally divorced in 1927. Had a son from the union of the same name. Achieved both critical and popular acclaim for his work, but tastes soon passed him by and he refused to alter the integrity of his pictures, for the more action-oriented westerns coming into vogue. The more successful he became, the more serious he took himself, ultimately losing his larger sense of reality in the pursuit of celluloid accuracy according to his vision. By 1920, his work had lost its mass appeal, although he continued making films for another 5 years, then sued his distributor, United Artists, for negligence, ultimately winning his case and several hundred thousand dollars, although his career was finished well before the advent of sound. After going into retirement, he wrote his autobiography, “My Life - East and West” as well as numerous Western novels, some of which, he penned with his sister, who lived with him until her death in 1944. Left instruction to turn his ranch into a museum and public park after his death of a stroke. Inner: Serious, dogged and stubborn, with decidedly sentimental Victorian sensibilities. Obsessed with bringing his realistic moral fantasies to life to the point of falling in love with the projected women he peopled them with. Stuck in the saddle lifetime of lassoing the public imagination, but once having captured it, unable to fully reel it in with the changing times. vWilliam B. Travis (1809-1836) - American lawyer and army officer. Outer: One of 10 children. His family moved to Alabama when he was 9. Attended a military academy in South Carolina, then studied law privately there, and was admitted to the bar before he was 20. 6’, 175 lbs. Unhappily married to Rosanna Cato, one of his pupils, in his mid-20s, 2 children from the union. Separated from and later divorced his wife, while leaving Alabama and coming to Texas, where he opened law offices in Anahuac on the Gulf coast, and was immediately drawn into the revolutionary movement, which wanted independence from Mexico. Arrested the following year when Mexican authorities declared martial law in Ananhauc and hauled in all activist Anglo-Texans. The prisoners, however, staged a near-rebellion and were released, as tensions twixt the two parties escalated. When Anahuac was garrisoned, he gathered two dozen followers and forced the surrender of the Mexicans, which angered moderates. After being enrolled in the Texas cavalry as a lieutenant colonel, he was sent to the fortified mission called the Alamo with reinforcements. Commanded the regulars there, while Col. Jim Bowie (Treat Williams) commanded the volunteers. Together the two had about 150 men. Bowie fell sick shortly afterwards, leaving himself in command. Fell during the siege, along with Davey Crockett (Arlo Guthrie) and Bowie, but gave America a watch-phrase, ‘Remember the Alamo,’ that would immortalize that future filmdom trio’s last dramatic stand. Inner: Charming, practical, astute, gallant, ambitious. Legendary lifetime of actualizing his sense of the martyred hero, while fully participating in the memorable dramatics of his time. vRobert Devereux, 3rd earl of Essex (1591-1646) - English nobleman and soldier. Outer: Father was Robert Devereaux, 2nd earl of Essex (Ethan Hawke), who was beheaded for treason when his oldest son was 10. Gained special permission to succeed to his sire’s titles and estates 3 years later. At 14, James I (Kenneth Tynan) arranged a marriage between him and Frances Howard, countess of Suffolk (Grace Kelly), who was repelled by him. Sent to travel on the continent, and when he returned, he discovered his wife had fallen in love with Robert Carr (Bob Hope). Her family saw the benefit of this second match for themselves, and manipulated a subsequent nullity commission, which concluded that her husband was impotent, and their daughter was still technically a virgin. Humiliated and embittered, he eventually became involved in military affairs, fighting several campaigns in The Thirty Years’ War, before being made a vice-admiral by James’ successor Charles I (George VI) in 1925, and fighting unsuccessfully against the Spanish. After being made second-in-command by the king in the Bishop’s War in 1639, he refused to take the monarch’s side, when he was subsequently deposed in the English Civil War. In 1642, he commanded the Parliamentary Army, fighting courageously against the royalist forces, but his army ultimately was forced to surrender in 1644, and he was the only one who successfully escaped by sea. Resigned his post the following year, just before Parliament passed an order denying its membership military command. Continued to sit in Parliament, while working to promote veteran’s affairs. Since he produced no issue, the earldom of Essex ended with him. Inner: Courageous and capable, although very attuned to the political currents of the time, preferring opportunity to idealism. Retiring disposition, sense of duty, ill-tempered when crossed, also very jealous. Swords-crossed lifetime of suffering degradation through a tainted father and a faithless wife, but managing to see his way clear of both through a strong instinct for survival and an equal adeptness at manipulating circumstances to his own ultimate advantage, while underlining his multi-life difficulties with the fairer sex.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS UNPREDICTABLE LUMINARY:
Storyline: The exuberant theatrical light continues his long love affair with the stage via a host of unexpected performances geared towards the triumphant donning of the dual masks of comedy and tragedy, without being rigidly cast in concrete in either.

vKevin Kline (Kevin Delaney Kline) 1947) - American actor and singer. Outer: Of German Jewish descent on his paternal side and Irish descent on his mother’s. Father was a Jewish musician who owned a toy and record store, mother was Catholic. Attended Catholic schools run by Benedictine monks, which taught him to retain his emotions, and gave him an added impetus to release them upon the stage. Had a desire for a musical career, although only acted in high school. Attended Indiana Univ., and for a lark auditioned for a part in “MacBeth,” which helped him decide to become an actor instead, switching his major to speech and theater. Founded an off-campus improvisational theater company, which totally hooked him on the stage as his lifework. 6’2”, with dark brown hair and eyes. Went to Juilliard afterwards and enrolled in its newly-founded drama division, studying under legendary director John Houseman, and then touring for 4 years with Houseman’s Acting Company. Began doing commercials and a daytime soap opera, “Search for Tomorrow,” while taking minor roles with the New York Shakespeare festival. Became a Broadway star, winning Tony awards for “On the Twentieth Century” and “The Pirates of Penzance.” Later starred in two off-Broadway productions of “Hamlet,” directing the 2nd one himself, while winning plaudits for the first in 1986 as potentially the actor of his generation. Has carried a well-worn copy of the play with him for over a quarter century, claiming to find constant new meaning in it. Made a well-received movie debut in his mid-30s, in Sophie’s Choice, playing a schizophrenic. Met his future wife, actress Phoebe Cates during casting calls for The Big Chill, although they did not begin dating until a decade later. Married her in his mid-40s, 2 sons from the union, including actor Owen. Won an Academy Reward for Best Supporting Actor in 1988 as a madcap criminal in A Fish Called Wanda. Has alternately played comedy and tragedy, while refusing to be pigeonholed in either category, and, in the process, he has developed into one of America’s pre-eminent actors both on stage and on-screen, capable of a wide variety of performances, most of them quite memorable. Live performance would remain his abiding love, and he would continue giving highly intelligent interpretations of classical roles, relying on an excellent innate sense of language, and a deep knowledge of both craft and character to retain his eminent place in American theatrical annals. In 2017, he returned to Broadway in a revival of Noel Coward’s “Present Laughter” acquitting himself in his usual excellent fashion, and winning his fourth Tony for his efforts. Has a net worth of over $32 million. Inner: Passion for Shakespeare and the stage. Heavy smoker, articulate, intelligent, reflective. Always looking for what’s least expected in his work, with the ability to infuse his characterizations with his own unique high energy. Exuberant lifetime of expected success through unexpected star turns in order to deepen his long love affair with his craft. vOtis Skinner (1858-1942) - American actor. Outer: Of Puritan descent, his immediate ancestors were men of the cloth, law and medicine. Father was a universalist minister. 2nd of 3 sons. His other brothers became an artist and a writer. Avid reader and self-taught graceful writer, but disliked school and left before graduating. Strong, well-knit. Worked as a clerk and later a correspondent for the NY Dramatic News and an editor of the Hartford Clarion. After seeing “The Hunchback of Notre Dame,” he was determined to be an actor. Read plays and gave amateur performances, then became a utility actor with a poverty-stricken stock company. Made his stage debut at 19 at the Philadelphia Museum in “Woodleigh,” and wound up playing 92 roles his first season. Moved up to the Walnut St. Theater, the following annum. Spent 2 years in Philadelphia before making his New York debut. Developed a classical repertory over the next 5 years, working with Edwin Booth (Ben Chaplin), who went on to become his teacher and revered friend. Afterwards he appeared with Lawrence Barrett (Frederic March), although he began to feel he was losing his own emotion and taking on that famous actor’s stances. Joined Augustin Daly’s (Aaron Spelling) company in his mid-20s, where he worked on his technical facilities. Stayed with the company for 5 years, during which time he made his London debut. Assayed hundreds of roles, most notably in the Shakespeare canon, in a career that spanned 60 years, and saw him play off of many of the leading actresses of the time, including Helena Modjeska (Ingrid Bergman) and Ada Rehan (Glenda Jackson). Managed his own company in 1894, and within the decade was an established star. In 1895, he married his leading lady, Maud Durbin, who retired as soon as they had an offspring. Their only child was the actress and writer, Cornelia Otis Skinner (Owen Kline), who appeared with him in one of his best-remembered roles as a matador in “Blood and Sand.” Maintained a home in Bryn Mawr, Pa. His career spanned 3 generations of theater, from when actors reigned supreme to the heyday of playwrights and directors. Died of uremic poisoning. Authored 2 books of reminiscences, “Footlights and Spotlights” and “Mad Folk of the Theater.” Inner: A disciplined and extremely conscientious actor, with a natural gift for self-expression, be it on the stage or the printed page. Being there lifetime of enjoying the full span of America’s transition into its modern theater, while serving as one of its pre-eminent stage personalities. Robert Wilks (1666-1732) - Irish/English actor and theatrical manager. Outer: Father moved to Dublin after the English Civil War, because of his Royalist sympathies, and became a stuffweaver there. Had several siblings, while evincing a lively spiritedness that had his sire envisioning a career in the church for him. Proved resistant to classical studies, which greatly disappointed his sire, who got him a position as a clerk in the office of the Irish Secretary of War. Frequented the theater, which made his own work quite tedious in comparison while spending his time at his desk reading plays. Secretly married his neighbor’s daughter, Elizabeth Knapton, much to the outrage of her father as well as his own, causing the couple to be buffeted about, while he lost his position. Two children from the union. Joined the Willamite Army during the war between supporters of the Catholic James II (Martin Sheen) and the Protestant William of Orange (Lyndon Johnson), playing in “Othello” in an amateur production, which accelerated his wish for an acting career. Upon his discharge, he joined the Smock Alley Theater Company in Dublin for two years in the early 1690s, before moving to London and hooking up the Drury Lane company, where he replaced the recently murdered William Mountfort (Hugh Grant). Returned to Dublin near century’s end, where his popularity soared. Tall, erect, with a pleasing sense about him. Teamed up with playwright George Fahrquahr (Clive Barker), and returned to London, where he scored his signature role of Harry Wildair, a rich and unreliable baronet, in the latter’s “The Constant Couple.” Became a matinee idol through his portrayals, while rising to director of rehearsals at Drury Lane, a position of some power. Left for the Haymarket Theater during an actor’s strike in 1706 against the management of Christopher Rich, and won star status there, as well. His “Hamlet” in particular, measured handsomely against the other leading actors who had assayed that classical role, although his primary reputation came from genteel comedy. Following the death of his first wife, he wed again, only to lose his second spouse, as well. Continued working in Farquahr vehicles, while becoming one of a quartet of managers of the Haymarket, including Colley Cibber (Brendan Behan), Thomas Doggett (Paul Robeson) and Anne Oldfield (Helen Hayes), although the latter was eased out because of her gender. Paid well for his various endeavors, particularly after getting a royal patent in 1714, with his contracted and expanded triumvirate, which swelled to a quartet again with the addition of Richard Steele (Stephen Fry). Maintained a busy schedule of performances, although he rarely left London on tour, because of his various duties as a manager, which extended back to Drury Lane. Married a third time to a gentlewoman who had worked as a seamstress and had several children of her own, whom he supported. Criticized along with his partners for their quick low-cost productions, and spectacles, rather than engaging theater, while his efforts garnered him a considerable amount of money. Following his death, he was buried at midnight, so as to avoid an ostentatious funeral per his request, while a monument in the graveyard was erected afterwards. Inner: Vain and tempestuous to some, good-natured, generous and shrewd to others. Fame’n’fortune lifetime of profiting handsomely from his endeavors, while accruing to his own experience both in front of and in back of the footlights, as a figure of pure projection for all those who knew him, and either liked or despised him.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS FACILE ACTION STAR:
Storyline: The coy cowboy parlays a winning personality and handsome physique into a multiple life action career, while slowly stretching himself in order to add depth and artistry to his winning screen presence.

vDon Johnson (Donald Wayne Johnson) 1949) - American actor, producer, director, singer and songwriter. Outer: Of British descent with some Scots-Irish. Father was a farmer, mother was a beautician. Oldest of 4, one brother became a writer and director. At 6, the family moved to Wichita, Kansas, where his father worked for an aircraft manufacturer. His parents subsequently divorced when he was 12, which devastated him. Became a hell-raiser, as well as abusive to his younger siblings and began skipping school so that he was sent to live with his progenitor at 13. Returned to his mother for his senior year of high school, while working in a local meat packing plant as a butcher’s apprentice, then as a ladies’ shoe salesman. Acted in his senior year in high school, which struck a responsive chord within him. 5’11”, 170 lbs, with dark blond hair and blue eyes. Had 2 brief youthful marriages, both of which were annulled. Won a drama scholarship to the Univ. of Kansas and gobbled up roles, then studied acting at the American Conservatory Theater. Did “Fortune and Men’s Eyes,” in Los Angeles and made his film debut at 19 in Good Morning and Goodbye. Played numerous leads in mostly forgettable films, as a handsome, dimple-cheeked hero. Became involved with actress Melanie Griffith when she was 15, married her in his mid-20s, divorced shortly afterwards, and then remarried her in his late 30s, their daughter, Dakota, became an actress. In the interim, he fathered a son with actress Patti D’Arbanville, with whom he also had a longtime relationship. Got his big break in his mid-30s, as the star of TV’s “Miami Vice,” creating a vogue with his unshaven look and pastel sweaters, which made the series highly popular for several years. Became involved in motorboat racing, and in his late 30s, won the offshore powerboat championship. Also released one singing album. In AA for drug abuse in 1983. Divorced Griffith and became involved with singer Barbra Streisand. Although a casual actor with no great range, he has proved a consistently popular Hollywood personality, with a playboy image and a good-time lifestyle. Starred in TV’s “Nash Bridges,” in the late 1990s, and married a 4th time, to Kelley Phleger, a former debutante and nursery school teacher, in 1999, a daughter and two sons from the union. In 2002, a car he was driving in Germany was discovered containing credit notes and securities worth $8 billion. Although no charges were filed, the incident caused him considerable discomfort. Launched the quickly cancelled “Just Legal,” in 2005, in unconscious response to the incident. His later career would consist mostly of TV series. Has a net worth of $40 million. Inner: Charming, promiscuous, competitive. Thrives on work, strong ego. Golden boy lifetime of parlaying his handsome features and likable craft to a successful career, while slowly trying to expand his abilities in front of the all-seeing camera. vBuck Jones (Charles Gebhardt) (1889-1942) - American cowboy star. Outer: Parents divorced soon after he was born. Unhappy with his mother’s second marriage to a hardware salesman, he lived with a couple who owned a general store. Moved with his sister to Indianapolis, and went to school there until the eighth grade. Hollywood publicity had him spending his boyhood on his father’s 3000 acre Oklahoma ranch, although no proof exists of this. 5’11 3/4 with dark brown hair. Joined the U.S. Cavalry at 16 from Indiana, when his mother attested to his being two years older, and saw action in both Mexico and the Philippines, where he was wounded in the leg as a cavalry rider. Mustered out in 1909 and returned to Indianapolis, showing a fascination for cars, and would tinker with them the rest of his life. Worked for Marmon cars as a test driver, and then reenlisted in the army, serving as a cavalry sergeant, with the desire to become a pilot, but was turned down because he was not an officer, and left the service for good in 1913. 5’10”, 178 lbs. Worked as a cowboy, then began appearing in Wild West shows, where he met his future wife, Odille Osborne, a professional rider, whom he married in 1915, in a show performance, since they had no money for a private wedding. Their daughter Maxine would eventually wed actor Noah Beery, Jr. Trained horses for the Allied cause during WW I, then toured with the Ringling Brothers circus, while also touring with his wife throughout the west. Entered films in his late 20s as an extra and a stuntman, making his debut in Blood Will Tell. 2 years later, he began playing leads and by his early 30s was a popular western star, with a flair for comedy, so as to serve as his own sidekick. Tried to start his own company, although it failed after one indie effort, as did a family riding show with his wife and daughter because of the onset of the Depression. Went to work for another circus, then settled for becoming a contract player with Columbia, making his first talkie in 1930. With his horse, Silver, he averaged 8 productions a year over the next 2 decades, while receiving a record number of fan mail. His popularity, however, eventually began to wane with singing cowboys and changing tastes, as he turned to radio and non-oaters. Found new life in a series called the Rough Riders, with another pair of 50+ stars, before perishing in a nightclub fire in Boston at the Cocoanut Grove, where he was trapped with nearly 500 others, although publicity would later paint him as a hero trying to rescue his fellow victims. Inner: Happy-go-lucky, adventurous, with a folksy charm. Continuation lifetime of combining martial adventure with popular performance, while oddly mirroring his earlier wife’s future demise by fire, in his own phoenix-like need to rise from his own ashes and reclaim is larger self. Texas Jack Omohundro (John Baker Omohundro) (1846-1880) - American scout, soldier, cowboy and actor. Outer: Of Irish descent. Fourth child of a farming family. Attended a country school, before dropping out at 15 to work as a cowboy in Texas, showing great skill with both rifles and horses, while also spending a couple of months as an indigene captive. At 17 he enlisted in the Confederate army of North Virginia, serving under J.E.B. Stuart, mainly as a scout. Mustering out at war’s end, he headed out west to become a cowboy again, picking up his sobriquet “Texas Jack,” while adopting a 5 year old indigene boy, who would take on his name, with a junior appended to it. Worked the Chisholm Trail for three years, then in 1869, he met Wild Bill Hickok (Gene Hackman), followed by Buffalo Bill Cody (Clint Eastwood), with the trinity becoming good friends. Through Cody’s auspices he became a cavalry trail agent and scout, showing great skills at tracking and shooting. Gained enough of a reputation to become a hero of dime novels, while also ingratiating himself with the Pawnee, learning their language and signs, while gaining their trust as a superior hunter, earning the nickname of “Whirling Rope,” for his prowess with a lasso. Along with Cody, he served as a guide of European royalty, with one Englishman immortalizing him in print to add to the lore already written about him in dime novels. At the end of 1872, he and Cody created a wild west stage show, “Scouts of the Prairie,” written by Ned Buntline (Mickey Spillane), although its two stars couldn’t remember their lines. The show went off without a hitch, with some ad-lib pistol play between its cowboy and indigenous actors and was a huge hit, although the duo broke off the greedy Buntline, and formed Cody’s Combination, while adding Will Bill to the cast and recasting it as “The Scouts of the Prairie.” In 1873, he married the show’s female star, Italian-born dancer Giuseppina Morlacchi (Rose McGowan), and they settled on an estate in Massachusetts. Returned to the frontier in 1876 as a scout and war correspondent for the New York Herald and Spirit of the Times, reporting on the Plains Indigene wars with the U.S. cavalry. Enjoyed his fame as popular tale spinner about his experiences on the frontier, and in 1877 he and his wife formed a theatrical troupe, touring the U.S. in a variety of melodramas, while making a considerable amount of money, which allowed them to buy a second home in Leadville, Colorado. A month before his 34th birthday, he caught pneumonia and died, devastating his wife who followed him six years later. Posthumously elected to the National Cowboy Hall of Fame in 1994. Inner: A natural in the saddle, with equal skills at exposition and self-promotion. Probably an indigene in the lives leading up to this one. Footloose lifetime of finding performance a perfect counterpoint to his trail skills, as a charming action hero, which he would continue to explore in subsequent go-rounds in this series.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS ACCIDENT-WAITING-TO-HAPPEN:
Storyline: The handsome screen hero has all the external gifts for longlived stardom, but his interior is one long horror movie of doubt and self-damage, which he is unable to transcend, and instead buries himself alive with his own bottled self-abnegating fury.

vHoward Rollins, Jr. (1950-1996) - American actor. Outer: Of African/American descent. Father was a steelworker and mother was a domestic worker. Youngest of 4. Initially wanted to be a teacher, but after attending a casting call at a local theater, he won a role in “Of Mice and Men,” and decided on acting as a career. 6’. Studied theater at Towson State College in Maryland, and after graduating, moved to NYC at 24. Did TV and stage work, and in 1979 made his film debut in 1979 in House of God. Garnered an Academy Reward nomination for best supporting actor 2 years later for Ragtime, and achieved his greatest film success in 1984 in A Soldier’s Story. His filmwork, afterwards, however, was sporadic, and he did mostly TV fare. Later in the decade, he starred in the small screen series, “In the Heat of the Night,” for 5 years, although found the work formulaic, and also felt isolated for racial reasons. Turned to cocaine and alcohol for solace, and was arrested in 1988 for crack cocaine possession. Went into rehab, but could not shake his overwhelming need for self-obliteration, and became very unpredictable, sometimes not showing up on the set at all. Eventually he was replaced, although the producer stated he would be welcomed back once he conquered his demons, which he never did. Arrested three more times in Georgia during the early 90s for driving under the influence, he made his final cinematic appearance in 1995 in the aptly titled, Drunks. Died the following year from complications from lymphoma. Inner: Self-destructive in the extreme, with an inability to integrate his noticeable talent with his deeper sense of self. Downward slide lifetime, once again, of falling victim to his fears and insecurities, instead of using his talent to truly see himself and recognize his considerable gifts. vJohn Bowers (John Bowersox) (1885-1936) - American actor. Outer: His birthdate has been erroneously given as 14 years later, although records show him to have been born in 1885. Father was a railroad engineer from Ohio who moved to Indiana. Mother was originally from Maryland. Originally intended to pursue a business career, but the lure of amateur theatricals proved too much of a draw, and he joined a stock company, eventually becoming a leading man. 6’. Made his uncredited film debut in 1914 in a Tom Mix oater, In the Days of the Thundering Herd. Dropped the ‘ox’ from his last name, and found himself in great demand, gradually rising to handsome leading man status, so that by the early 1920s, he was playing opposite many of the screen’s major silent female stars. In 1923, he starred with Marguerite de La Motte (Paula Abdul) in Desire, and desire it turned out to be between the two both on set and off, so that they married soon after, and subsequently appeared in a dozen features together over the next four years. The advent of sound in 1927, however, spelled the death knell for his career, and he only appeared in 3 features afterwards. In his last film, in 1931, Mounted Fury, he played an alcoholic, which was a true-to-life reflection of what he had become because of his faltering career. His wife divorced him, and with his run in Tinseltown over, he returned to Indiana in 1932 to take care of his ailing mother. When she died in 1936, he returned to Hollywood, deeply depressed and dead broke. After being turned down by director Henry Hathaway, despite pleading for a job, he rented a small sailboat and jumped overboard, after announcing he would do just that. His body washed ashore 2 days later, and his death would later be used as an inspiration for the character of Norman Maine, in the oft-reshot film, A Star is Born. Inner: Shooting-star lifetime of blazing a brief trail across the Hollywood firmament, before flaming out and allowing his inability to cope with failure overwhelm him, in his ongoing battle with bottled frustrations, that never find true release. nDavid Herold (1842-1865) - American assassination conspirator: Outer: Father was chief clerk at the Navy store of the Washington Navy Yard for twenty years. 6th of 11 children, with two brothers who died young, and 8 sisters. Grew up in comfortable circumstances, and then studied pharmacy at Georgetown College, before working for several druggists, and as a clerk for a doctor. Also labored for a quack physician for a brief time in NYC. Met John Surratt (James Earl Ray), while going to a military academy, and through him, actor John Wilkes Booth (Michael Kennedy) in 1863. Drawn into the Abraham Lincoln (Carl Sandburg) assassination plot by the latter, he became part of the infamous group who martyred the president. Originally chosen to assassinate vice-president Andrew Johnson (George Wallace), although never did, for reasons unknown. Went to the home of cabinet member William Seward (Howard Cosell) with Lewis Powell (Jack Ruby), but the clumsy attempts by Powell to stab Seward caused him to panic, and he rode off to link up with Booth right after he had shot Lincoln at Ford’s Theater. The two galloped off into the night, and he accompanied Booth to the home of Dr. Samuel Mudd, who treated the former’s broken leg, before riding off again as fugitives. Bragged about the deed, showing little remorse, and twelve days after the assassination, they were cornered on a farm in northern Virginia by Union troops, and he was captured outside a burning barn, while Booth was killed. At his subsequent trial, his defense claimed he was extremely immature and easily led, but he was found guilty, and hanged with three other conspirators, Powell, Mary Surratt (Anna Nicole Smith) and George Atzerodt (Lee Harvey Oswald). Urinated on the gallows, and shuddered for several minutes before dying. His grave remained unmarked until one of his sisters died in 1917, at which point he finally received a marker. Inner: Boyish, filled with braggadocio and easily manipulated. An avid hunter, he was comfortable with guns all his life. Muddled lifetime of being a secondary player in a major American tragedy, and then subconsciously internalizing his guilt over it in self-destructive public lives to come.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS SERIOUS SELF-HEALER:
Storyline: The sobersided sailor eschews skimming the aesthetic surface of himself for a plunge into his deeper waters, allowing the conflicts of his interior to supersede his dead ringer refined self.

Jeremy Irons (Jeremy John Irons) (948) - British actor. Outer: Father was an accountant. Youngest of three with a brother and sister. Grew up in a yachting resort town Led a childhood of deliberate containment, although he found expression through acting and playing drums in a band called the Four Pillars of Wisdom. His parents separated when he was 13, and he was forced to reign in his emotions at school. 6’ 2”, and lanky, with light brown hair. Wanted to be a veterinarian, but was unable to pass the entrance exams in the sciences. Moved to London, became a social worker, and a part/time busker, performing on the streets, which he loved doing, and decided on a theatrical career. Married actress Julie Hallam in 1969, although the union was soon annulled. Became assistant stage manager in Canterbury, before studying for 3 years at the Bristol Old Vic Theater School. Left in 1971 to enter the commercial theater, doing house-cleaning and gardening to support himself, while making his stage debut in “Hay Fever”. His first major role was in 1973 as John the Baptist in “Godspell,” and he has worked steadily ever since. Acted with both the NY and Royal Shakespeare companies, and also did TV for the BBC, as well as winning a Tony Award in 1984 for “The Real Thing.” Married actress Sinead Cusack at 30, two sons from the union, including actor Samuel Irons. His film debut in 1980 in Nijinsky was less than soaring, but was one of only a few clinkers in an otherwise memorable screen career, often playing upper-class types. First garnered cinematic notice as the romantic interest in 1981 in The French Lieutenant’s Woman. Always looking for challenges, he has selected his roles carefully, including playing deranged twin gynecologists in Dead Ringers in 1988. Also shared the lead in the BBC series “Brideshead Revisited.” Won an Academy Reward for Best Actor in 1990 for Reversal of Fortune. Continually in demand as a serious, conflicted lead, specializing in being the male end of unusual, and often, unsatisfactory love relationships, despite having an extremely satisfactory one in his own private life. Inner: Serious, self-obsessed, with the ability to use both his body and his voice to equal effect in his characterizations. Secret desire to heal and be of service, using acting as a vehicle for teaching, and as a way to plumb himself. Always looks for elements of himself in his characterizations, rather than trying to hide himself in his roles. Harbors a great love of the sea, avid boatsman, skilled horseman and a dedicated actor. Self-absorbed lifetime of repressing his younger self in order to give added motivation for self-expression later on, in an ongoing process of deliberate self-investigation, self-teaching and self-healing through aesthetic means. Frank Benson (Francis Benson) (1858-1939) - English actor and theater manager. Outer: Father was a barrister. Third son and 4th child, with his eldest sibling, W. A. S. Benson, a well-known industrial artist, and his youngest, Godfrey Benson, a Liberal MP. Educated at Winchester and New College, Oxford, where he proved an uninspired student. A skilled athlete and runner, he also produced the university’s first Greek play, the “Agamemnon,” which led him to a career on the boards, making his debut in a support role in “Romeo and Juliet” in 1882. The following year, he founded his own theater company after taking it over from a predecessor, and focused on the plays of Shakespeare. Married actress Gertrude Cockburn in 1886, and she would continue to appear with him, often as his leading lady. Their son was killed in WW I. Used his productions to promote his own stardom, and also toured the provinces extensively as the only modern repertory company to do so, in an effort to bring high culture to the outlanders. Made his initial reputation outside the London stage, although he eventually hooked up with several of the city’s prominent theaters. His touring company would prove training grounds for a host of actors and actresses who went on to well-received careers of their own, and, in that regard, in 1901, he founded his own acting school, proving to be a key figure in the English theater of the early 20th century. His initial focus was on Shakespeare, reviving many of the master’s works that had not seen footlights for many a generation. In 1888, he began managing the Stratford-on-Avon Shakespearean Festival, and would continue to do so. Had a good stage presence, abetted by his athleticism, so that he was well-suited for his various characterizations, with both voice and physicality. His singular production that was filmed was “Richard III” in 1911, in which he played title character. Knighted in 1916, and served for two years as an ambulance driver in WW I, despite his age, winning the French Croix de Guerre at conflict’s end. Exhausted his fortune in his desire to bring Shakespeare to as wide an audience as possible, and at life’s nearend was given a very modest civil pension. Inner: Despite his athleticism, never viewed as a physical actor, nor was his voice seen as distinguished. Motivated more by love of craft than overwhelming skill. Greatly imbued with the Bard of Avon, feeling himself an emissary for his plays. Teacherly lifetime of bringing his considerable will to bear on elevating the theatrical culture of his time, before returning in a more skilled state to plunge deeper into himself and continue to perfect his craft.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS HIGHLY CHARGED TEACHER:
Storyline: The coiled craftsman explores himself as an ongoing unedited film in his early life, then channels his considerable emotion into art, in an ongoing desire to integrate himself around disintegrative and unintegrated worlds.

vSamuel L. Jackson (Samuel Leroy Jackson) (1948) - American actor and producer. Outer: Of Western African descent, with some British as well as Amerinian roots. Parents separated when he was young, and his sire proved totally disinterested in him, the only child of the union, fathering other children and quitting the army so he didn’t have to pay child support. Sent to live with his maternal grandparents, and his mother rejoined him when he was 10. Close to his grandfather, who was a maintenance man. Realized as a child that movies were censored for black people, and came to see his enforced apartness, through growing up in the segregated South. Wanted to be an architect, mother wanted him to be a pediatrician. 6’3”, lanky. Served as student body president in high school, and was diligent about becoming a success. Went to Morehouse College to study marine biology, but was expelled for being part of a protest crew that locked the school’s trustees in a building for 2 days in 1969. Also part of the nearby street scene, under the sobriquet of ‘Slim,’ giving vent to his innate rebellious, which he had repressed as a teenager, as an active member of the Black Power movement. Saw the Negro Ensemble Co., and realized acting would serve him best, as a place to put his rage and humor. Escaped the Atlanta scene as a life-saving measure and became a social worker in Los Angeles for 2 years, then returned to Morehouse as a drama major and graduated in 1971. Founded the Black Image theater in Atlanta, which played mostly to white audiences, and where he met his future wife, actress LaTanya Richardson, who was also raised by her grandparents. Moved to NYC on Halloween in 1976, and was involved in a subway accident damaging his leg. Worked as an off-Broadway security guard during slow stretches, while building up an impressive theatrical resume, although was never offered a starring role on Broadway. Always performed while high, and periodically would go off on self-destructive benders. Married Richardson in 1980, one daughter. Became addicted to crack cocaine in 1990, but finally broke through his drug dependency in rehab, and gave his true emotional essence its proper focus. Began making cameo appearances in movies, but didn’t get his breakthrough role until 1991, playing a drug addict in Jungle Fever, drawing his reel life and real life together. Made a half dozen movies in 1992, then in 1993, began getting his first starring roles, becoming a name player through Pulp Fiction and Die Hard With A Vengeance. Co-founder of the Atlanta-based Just Us Theatre Company. Wound up making more films than anyone else in the 1990s, with 44, as well as TV appearances and documentaries, mixing small independent fare with slick studio packages. Even more active after the turn of the century, sometimes churning out 5 movies a year. Able to channel his intense presence into any role given him, raising the wattage of the surrounding film, making him a much sought-after player, and a well-integrated major star on all levels, who knows where he’s been and is proud of where he has taken himself, with the help of the love of those closest to him. Had his first starring role on Broadway in 2011, in the Martin Luther King drama, “Journey to the Mountaintop,” garnering good reviews. Constantly working on both the large and small screens, as a go-to actor who remains much in demand to anchor any production in which he is involved. On some lists, credited with being the 2nd highest grossing actor of all-time at 4.63 billion. In 2016, he won the BET Lifetime Achievement Award. In the 2017 retelling of the King Kong cinema legend, Kong: Skull Island, he gave the CGI title character a good run for film dominance with his own blustering performance. Inner: Intensely disciplined and purposeful, with the ability to turn his roiling interior into steady art, allowing him peace in his non-working life. Always views his roles in theaters alongside paying audiences. Extremely active mind, creating back-stories for all his characters, so as to thoroughly know them before assaying them for film. Avid golfer, addictive personality, and sports fiend. Perfectionist, willing to give acerb reminders to fellow players or directors not giving their all. Great love for the art of film. Fatherless lifetime of teaching himself what it means to be a man, and finding he had a good teacher all along in himself. Richard B. Harrison (1864-1935) - Canadian/American actor, lecturer and teacher. Outer: Of African/Canadian descent. His parents escaped slavery via the underground railway, and fled to Canada. 4th child and oldest son. Father died when he was young, raised by his mother. Sold newspapers to support the family, and was galvanized by the stage, after seeing a performance of Shakespeare’s “Richard III.” 6’, with a leonine head and iron eyes. A good impersonator, he hung around theaters and gave impromptu performances to friends, repeating plays he had seen. Studied at the Detroit School of Dramatic Art, while working as a bellhop, porter, waiter and mailclerk for the railroad. In 1885, he married Gertrude Washington, the first black person to graduate from the Chicago Conservatory of Music, son and daughter from the union, with the former becoming a choir director. In his late 20s and early 30s, he traveled the Chatauqua circuit, giving readings, and was very close with short-lived poet Paul Lawrence Dunbar (Lorraine Hansberry). Became a teacher and dramatic’s coach after convincing the president of North Carolina A&T, it needed a summer drama program, while living in NYC most of the year. Played De Lawd in 1930, in Marc Connelly’s “Green Pastures,” which would be his culminating role, and symbol of his longtime stance as gifted creative teacher. The recipient of honorary degrees from a host of colleges and universities. Died of heart failure, just before a performance, and more than 15,000 attended his funeral. Inner: Always wanted to play Shylock in “The Merchant of Venice.” Dedicated to his art, although more the teacher and lecturer than the performer, before concentrating on the latter skill in his next go-round. Odd-man-out lifetime of serving as a peripheral theatrical figure, rather than a star, in order to augment and expand his knowledge of his craft, while still garnering the admiration and respect accorded his far more famous mainstream peers.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS EASTERN WESTERNER:
Storyline: The suicidal Buddhist learns to find his center, not in his handsome exterior, but in his hidden interior, and, in so doing, achieve a certain peace of mind and pace, heretofore denied him in his unconscious quest for the beauty within.

vRichard Gere (Richard Tiffany Gere) (1949) - American actor and social activist. Outer: Of British and Scots-Irish descent. Father was a farmer turned insurance salesman, who instilled within his son the desire to make the world a better place. Oldest of 5, one brother became a concert pianist, 3 sisters. Had a normal childhood, and was close to his parents, who raised him on a farm. A trumpet player and gymnast in high school, as well as pianist, and occasional composer. 5’10”, 160lbs., with dark brown eyes and prematurely gray hair as well as strongly built and movie star handsome. Became a philosophy major at the Univ. of Mass, where he had won a scholarship, but dropped out in his sophomore year, to be a musician. Landed a job in summer stock at Provincetown Playhouse, then went to Seattle where he acted and composed music for a Seattle repertory theater. In 1970, he joined a musician’s commune in Vermont but left after a few months. Drifted to NYC, where he was an understudy for the lead in “Grease,” then when to London, appearing on the stage in both cities, where he did a star turn in “Grease,” which he reprised on the Broadway stage. Had numerous further roles and studied acting with the director of the American Place Theater. Despite a growing reputation, he became disenchanted with the theater, which led him to filmdom. Made his debut in his mid-20s as a pimp in Report to the Commissioner. Gained notice as a knife-wielding threat in Looking for Mister Goodbar in 1977, and his career took off. Although raised as a Methodist, he converted to Buddhism in his mid-20s, which superseded his career, particularly after experiencing early desires for suicide, despite his overt successes. After a visit to a Tibetan refugee camp, he became a disciple of the exiled Dalai Lama, and spent much time and energy on the issue of the latter’s return to his rightful spiritual throne in Tibet. Helped found the Tibet House in NYC with composer Philip Glass a decade later. Also active on behalf of Central American refugees, after a personal visit to the region. In his ongoing worldly adventures, he barely escaped with his life, after watching canoe-racing in Borneo. In 1980, he became the first American male movie star to flash himself in a full frontal shot in American Gigolo, and has never been shy about displaying his buttocks, even into his late 50s. Married supermodel Cindy Crawford in his early 40s, duo later divorced. Made an impassioned plea at the 1993 Academy Rewards ceremony for the plight of exiled Tibetans, after having done the same thing the previous year for AIDS. The ploy cost him his big ticket career, because of studio fears of his having offended the huge Chinese market. Wed actress Carey Lowell in 2002, one son from the union, although like his father, was often away from home tending to the needs of others, which effectively ended his marriage in 2013. Offended Indian sensibilities by publicly lavishing Bollywood actress Shilpa Shetty with affection during an AIDS-awareness event in 2007, and wound up with an arrest warrant issued against his Western disregard for sub-continental behavior. His activism has turned him into a character actor rather than a lead, which is fine by him. Has a net worth of $100 million. Inner: Intense, impassioned, involved. Often chooses vehicles which highlight the theme of identity. Inner light lifetime of veering away from the usual supreme self-involvement of screen stardom to become a voice of the voiceless, and use his fame and prestige to underscore the inequities of our benighted world, while trying to explore egolessness in the most narcissistic of environments. vLou Tellegen (Isidore Van Dameler) (1881-1934) - Dutch/American actor. Outer: Beginnings unclear, probably of Dutch/Greek descent, and the illegitimate son of an army officer, who died when his son was 19. Offered a fantastical background for himself, claiming to have run away from Russia with his father’s mistress and winding up in a St. Petersburg jail for selling obscene books. Performed a high wire act in a St. Petersburg circus, then worked as an artist’s model in Paris. Traveled widely, studying with a Buddhist Hindu, then performed as a bullfighter in Granada. Married a countess, Jeanne de Broncken in 1903, divorced two years later. ade his stage debut in Amsterdam in his early 20s, and 6 years later afterwards prominence on the French stage as actress Sarah Bernhardt’s (Laurie Anderson) leading man. Accompanied her on her American tour in 1910, then starred in 3 of her vehicles, the last of which was a hit in the U.S. A handsome leading man, he returned to the U.S. in his early 30s, and starred in a couple of Broadway productions before heading out to Hollywood to permanently settle there. Married opera star Geraldine Farrar in his mid-30s, divorced 7 years later, then wed twice more, to actress Nina Romano from 1923 to 1928, and Eve Casanova from 1930 to 1932. In addition to acting, mostly in silent films, he also directed several cinematic efforts, although his career was definitely on the wane by the time sound arrived to the movies. Published his memoirs, “Women Have Been Kind.” Committed suicide by eviscerating his heart and chest with a golden pair of scissors. Found naked and blood-soaked surrounded by aging clippings of himself in his glory days. Inner: Charming and magnetic, although probably held a great feeling of emptiness. Hari-kiri mode of suicide indicates hidden Eastern consciousness and inability to integrate it into a western body. Lost-in-inner-space lifetime of difficulties in finding completion through normal avenues of success, which he would redress by touching directly on his ancient spiritual roots the next time around in this series.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS CHARACTER ACTOR IN A STAR’S BODY:
Storyline: The self-absorbed seeker utilizes his celluloid realities to alter his states of self-perception while continually looking for more interesting projections of his interior in which to loosen and lose himself.

vWilliam Hurt (William McChord Hurt) (1950) - American actor. Outer: Of British descent, with some German, Scottish and Irish. Father was a government official who worked for the State Dept. One of two brothers. Spent most of his childhood in Guam, where his sire was stationed. His parents divorced when he was 6, and he lived with his mother in NYC, although visited his father in exotic ports-of-call on vacations. His mother married Henry Luce III, heir to the Time-Life fortune, when he was 10. Unable to countenance their sudden wealth, he was sent off to prep school, where he found solace in school dramatics. Majored in theology at Tufts Univ., through the influence of his step-father, but preferred the drama department, where he met and married actress Mary Beth Supinger. The duo moved to London, where he spent his senior year studying dramatics, before returning to NYC and enrolling at the Juilliard School, although he suffered initially from paralyzing stage fright. 6’3”, with blonde hair and blue eyes. After his marriage fell apart, he motorbiked across the U.S. and made his stage debut in his early 20s in a regional Shakespeare festival in Oregon. Joined NY’s Circle Repertory Company in his mid-20s, and enjoyed several stage successes, winning an Obie Award in 1977 for “My Life.” Made his screen debut 3 years later in Altered States, and became a leading player of the silver screen, specializing in portraying complex men with conflicted interiors. Won an Academy Reward for Best Actor in 1985 for his portrayal of an imprisoned homophile in Kiss of the Spider Woman. Divorced his first wife in 1982, and became involved with Sandra Jennings, a ballet dancer, one son from the union. His unmarried mate later sued him in a landmark case, claiming to be his common-law wife, despite his having already married Heidi Henderson, the daughter of bandleader Skitch Henderson. Two sons from the latter union, which ended in divorce in 1993. Later had a daughter with actress Sandrine Bonnaire. Always capable of interesting performances, no matter the vehicle, while continually looking for challenges to his actorly sensibilities, and being unafraid to show hair loss and his natural aging processes, in a medium that usually frowns upon itTook on the role of agent Frank Hamer in the cable series remake of the classic “Bonnie & Clyde,” in 2013, in a largely forgettable production that did little to reflect its classic filmic antecedent, in one of the few questionable moves of a career noted for its integrity. Two years later, while filming Midnight Rider, a biopic in which he played rocker Greg Allman, he intuited something profoundly wrong, and immediately afterwards, a female camera crew member was killed in an accident, which shut down production. Soon after, he returned to the small screen in “Humans” playing a human who forms a father-son relationship with his robotic servant known as a synth. Has a net worth of $15 million. Inner: Intense, self-involved, with a great desire to be known as a character actor despite his matinee idol looks. Ability to grow and mature in his craft, with a singular dedication to expanding his considerable talents. Self-involved lifetime of trying to transcend his handsome outer appearance by bringing to life an equally compelling, albeit totally self-absorbed, interior through the self-discovery of his chosen craft. vKing Baggot (1874-1948) - American actor/director. Outer: Father was a prominent St. Louis real estate investor. Initially wanted to be a baseball player. Began his career upon the stage, switching to films in his early 30s, commencing with The Scarlet Letter. 6’. Married in 1912, son of the same name became a cinematographer. Became one of the first movie personalities known by name to the American public. Handsome and virile, he quickly developed into an adventure star, making some 300 shorts and features. Despite his overt success, he remained in the second tier of stars of his time, providing competent entertainment without emblazing himself on the public imagination. Also began working as a director in the silent era, making dozens of films, although without any standouts to his credit. With the advent of sound, he returned solely to acting, playing mostly character roles, before finally retiring from the screen in his late 60s. Died of a stroke. Inner: Unchallenging lifetime of pursuing a conventional career through his pleasing masculinity and storytelling skills, without stretching himself as an actor or a director, necessitating a far more focused existence in his next go-round to plumb his deeper and more creative side.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS LOVABLE LUG:
Storyline: The two-fisted song-and-dance man utilizes his athleticism and strong emotionality to good effect in a variety of venues in an attempt to add self-expression to his natural ability for crowd-pleasing antics.

vTony Danza (Antonio Ladanza) (1950) - American actor. Outer: Mother was an Italian immigrant, father was a sanitation worker. Older of 2 sons, very close to his mother. Grew up in Brooklyn, then moved to Long Island. Attended the Univ. of Dubuque in Iowa on a wrestling scholarship. 5’9” with dark brown hair and eyes. Went through a series of odd jobs, and briefly appeared in summer stock. Became a golden gloves amateur fighter, first as a heavyweight, then as a middleweight, before turning professional in his mid-20s. Already married and divorced, between 1971 and 1974, to Rhonda Yeoman, with a young son. Had a record of 13 and 3. His second to last fight, in which he gutsily rose from the canvas to win by a knockout, was witnessed by a TV producer who sent him to Hollywood to read for a TV sit-com. In 1978, he was cast as an Irish fighter on the successful series “Taxi,” and moved to Los Angeles, finally gaining custody of his son when the latter was 13. Followed his 5 season earlier hit with an 8 year run, as a male housekeeper on “Who’s The Boss,” beginning in 1984. Despite occasional film roles, his stock in trade has continued to be the small screen. Made headlines for assaulting a security guard in his mid-30s, and was sentenced to community service, later rammed their car when he saw 2 men videotaping his children on a Malibu beach. It took 5 years for his next wife, Tracy Robinson, to finally agree to go out with him, and he married her in his mid-30s, 2 daughters from union. Following his mother’s death, he crashed into a tree while skiing and tore up his body, but recovered after 6 months of physical therapy. Executive produced a third TV series, “Hudson Street,” once more playing a character named Tony, although it fared poorly. Had a lifelong dream to be a dancer and entertainer, unconsciously tapping into his earlier existence in this series, and wound up putting together a nightclub act. Has also worked on stage, although realizes his limits as an actor, as he did as a fighter. Made his Broadway debut in 1998 in a revival of Arthur Miller’s “View From the Bridge,” and continues to pursue the stage as viable alternative for him, while also working on network TV. Given a talk-show in 2004, and though it was put on at an ungodly hour, he persevered with it for three seasons. Became a teacher in the Philadelphia school system as he neared 60, as a labor of love, turning his efforts into a reality show called “Teach: Tony.” After separating earlier, he ended his 24 year marriage by filing for divorce in 2011. The teens would see him occasionally appearing on talk shows, with no desire to involve himself in any palpable projects. Has a net worth of $40 million. Inner: Highly physical and emotional, hard worker, family man, good-natured, but with a strong temper. Up from the canvas lifetime of actualizing his own sense of the American Dream, while successfully fighting his own physical, self-damaging impulses. vJohn ‘Rags’ Ragland (John Lee Morgan Beauregard Ragland) (1905-1946) - American actor and dancer. Outer: Had a workingclass upbringing. Hit the road as a truck driver, then became a boxer, before giving it up to become a burlesque comedian in his 20s, working his way up to top banana at Minsky’s. Became notorious for his ad libs, and his unpredictable intrusions into his fellow comics’ acts, for which he was not appreciated. Married and then divorced in 1926, son of the same name from union. Very seductive and predatory, with a host of lovers, including Gypsy Rose Lee. Became a top banana in burlesque, and spent most of his entertainment career on Broadway as a dancer and comic in musical comedies, with occasional movie appearances in saidsame, beginning in 1941, reprising his stage role in Panama Hattie. Appeared in some 2 dozen MGM movies as a good-natured lug with a facility for mangling the language, most notably as Red Skelton’s sidekick in his series of “Whistling” movies. Died prematurely and suddenly of uremia several days before his 41st birthday. Inner: Extremely physical and highly sexed. Knocked out lifetime of giving expression to himself through his footwork and his largely lug-like likeability, only to be ultimately consumed by a body that wasn’t as strong as it looked.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS VIRILE HERO:
Storyline: The academic athlete proves himself as a square-jawed straight-shooter in both his personal and professional life, acting as private and public support to those closest to him, while giving both his mind and body a good run for their money.

vKurt Russell (1951) - American actor. Outer: Of English, German, Scottish and Irish descent on his paternal side. Father was baseball-player-turned-actor Bing Russell, who spent 12 seasons on “Bonanza,” playing a sheriff, among other roles. One younger sister. Began performing in films and on TV as a child, and won a starring role on “The Travels of Jamie McPheeter”’ at 12. Spent his teens as an All-American boy in numerous Disney productions, before giving professional baseball a try at 19. 5’11”, with blue eyes and dark brown hair. Tore a shoulder muscle after 2 years and returned to his show business roots, playing Elvis Presley in a TV biopic in his late 20s. Despite tensions with his father over his independence, the latter served as his financial manager until his late 20s. Married actress Season Hubley in 1979, one son, later divorced. In 1981, he starred in Escape from New York, as one-eyed Snake Plisskin, and subsequently enjoyed a popular career as a leading man, showing a versatility to his acting in a variety of roles, usually playing heroes. Although never a superstar, always a solid performer, holding his own in the second tier of high-priced Hollywood talent. Hooked up with actress Goldie Hawn, one child from longtime union, although the two never officially got married, because of her fears around that institution. Able, however, to help her overcome her problems surrounding manipulative men, thanks to an extremely close family life, as he became father to her two children as well. The family would also become involved in the joint production company, Cosmic Entertainment. Enthusiastic car racer and sportsman, with a trophy case full of awards for his various endeavors. Has a net worth of $70 million. Inner: Intelligent, articulate, highly opinionated, with strong political convictions, and little real use for Hollywood. Athletic and competitive, using sports as a release from the demands of his public life. Square-jawed lifetime of playing off his athletic/show biz roots to become one of the few juveniles to extend his career successfully into adulthood, while giving his longtime mate the love and support she had needed to get her past her fears of men as exploitative louts. Milton Sills (1882-1930) - American actor. Outer: From a well-to-do family, father was a dealer in mica, and mother was from a banking family. Privileged upbringing, where both his intellectual and aesthetic natures were encouraged. Went to the Univ. of Chicago, where he majored in philosophy and became involved in college dramatics. Traveled in Europe, then did graduate work in philosophy at his alma mater for 2 years . 6’1”, 180 lbs. Tall and rugged, as well as an expressive actor, he joined several stock companies, before making his NY stage debut in his mid-20, specializing in virile he-man roles. Became a Broadway star and married Gladys Wynne, an actress, in his late 20s, daughter from union. Entered films in his early 30s, with The Pit in 1914, and proved a handsome hero in a wide range of movies, from Westerns to swashbucklers to comedy and melodrama, while also working on the stage during his first 3 years in that medium. Moved to California and became an ardent horticulturist, while he was considered a relative highbrow in Hollywood circles. Divorced in his early 40s, and the following year, he married actress Doris Kenyon, who starred in a number of his films, one son. One of the highest paid stars throughout the 1920s in a variety of silents. Lived royally on a well-tended estate with servants. Had a nervous breakdown in his late 40s at the advent of sound films, although later recovered. Despite having the innate ability to make the transition, he died of a heart attack while playing tennis, before realizing that ambition. Inner: Cerebral, cultured, athletic, man of action and intellect, with a great love of beautiful surroundings. American dream lifetime of taking full advantage of a privileged upbringing, to carve a popular career for himself, and live in the high style to which he had been accustomed from birth, before letting his nerves dictate a premature ending.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS THE WIZARD OF ODDBALLS:
Storyline: The unclassifiable comedian brings his eccentric energy to comedy, drama and dramedy, while etching his own unique niche in Hollywood annals by playing with his own reflection via his self-embattled, darkly humored heroes.

vMichael Keaton (Michael Douglas) (1951) - American actor and director. Outer: Of German, British, Scottish, and Scots-Irish on his paternal side, and Irish on his maternal. American actor and director. Outer: From a lower middle-working/class background. Father was a civil engineer, mother was a home/maker. Youngest of 7 children. Liked to draw attention to himself, via humorous skits. 5’10”, with light brown hair and blue eyes as well as physical and athletic. Majored in speech at Kent State Univ. but dropped out after 2 years. While working as a cab and ice-cream truck driver, he began performing at local coffeehouses in Pittsburgh, before joining the crew of the city’s Public Television station in his early 20s. Moved to Los Angeles 3 years later, and began his professional career there as a member of the Second City improvisational group, then did comedy writing and appeared on several TV shows. Made his film debut in his early 30s in Night Shift, and married actress Caroline MacWilliams, ultimately separating and then reuniting, one son. Beginning with comic parts, he broadened his range, most noticeably with a surreal turn as a lively dead man in Beetlejuice in 1988. The following year, he gave a dark, brooding performance as the star of the megahit Batman, and became a hot Hollywood commodity, alternating between comedy and drama, including playing 4 different versions of the same character in the clone comedy, Multiplicity. Particularly adept at dark comedy, with an affinity for limning troubled oddball characters at war with themselves. Although far from the Hollywood mold of conventional leading players, he has been able to create a notable career through the sheer dint of his unusual persona. After stardom in the 80s, he turned to support roles, indies and voiceovers, including one indie he directed, The Merry Gentleman, in 2008, playing a hit man in a slow-moving character study which got mixed reviews. Also did TV during this period, determined not to repeat himself or take easy roles. Sprang back to stardom in 2014, with Birdman an extremely well-received vehicle, giving him ample opportunity to display his considerable chops once again as an actor who desires legitimacy after playing a feathered superhero in several blockbusters. Subsequently won a Golden Globe for his performance. In 2016’s The Founder he gave a subtle rendering of Ray Kroc, the needy, drive mastermind behind MacDonald’s, usurping it from its original owners and creating a revolutionary fast-food enterprise from it, making the predatory businessman almost likable. Added to his considerable coterie of memorable oddball portrayals via the villainous Vulture in 2017’s Spiderman: Homecoming. Has a net worth of $15 million Inner: Intense, mercurial and politically liberal with a strong temper. Revels in his own sense of extraordinary ordinariness, while remaining unfazed by his own success. Amped up lifetime of expanding his edgy range, while continuing to learn how to channel his emotions into his craft, rather than his own uninhibited volatility. vFrank Morgan (Francis Wupperman) (1890-1949) - American actor. Outer: Father was a prosperous manufacturer of bitters for cocktails. One of 11 children, older brother was actor Ralph Morgan. Upper middle-class upbringing. 6’, 180 lbs. Attended Cornell Univ., then worked at a variety of jobs, including selling toothbrushes and bronco-busting, before following his sibling onto the stage, making his Broadway debut in his mid-20s. 2 years later, he made his film debut in The Suspect, while continuing to work in front of the footlights over the next decade, making intermittent appearances in films. Married Alma Muller in 1914, 2 children. Settled permanently in Hollywood in his early 40s, and became an MGM fixture, playing roguish middle-aged types as a supporting character actor and grade-B lead. Won a lifetime contract from the studio for his efforts. Best remembered for the title role in The Wizard of Oz. A popular and amiable character actor, he worked steadily until his death of natural causes. Inner: Eccentric and malleable. Well-liked lifetime of focusing on the lighter side of his persona, as a support rather than a lead, before returning in far darker form to display the off-centered wizardry that lay beneath his veneer of amiability.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS POLYMATHIC POLICEMAN:
Storyline: The guarded guide lets rock’n’roll open up his heretofore overly sensitive soul, in order to give his inner need for self-expression more of a resounding, masculine bite.

vSting (Gordon Sumner) (1951) - English musician, actor, producer and vintner. Outer: Father was a milkman, and a tenor who entertained at family parties, mother was a hairdresser who had a strong affinity for rock’n’roll. Oldest of 4. From the age of 8, he rose at 4 to help his progenitor with his rounds. Felt marooned by poverty in the shipbuilding city in which he grew up. Went to Catholic school, good athlete, was a north England running champion, but also a cut-up, often getting beatings for his behavior. 6’, with blue eyes and blond hair as well as a strong male cast. Attended the Univ. of Warwick, but was far more interested in drinking and partying, and left after one term. Went to a teacher’s training college, then taught 9 year olds in a Catholic school. In his early 20s, he married an actress, Frances Tomelty, 2 children from union. Named for a yellow and black jersey he often wore, while playing with a local jazz band called Lost Exit, before hooking up with 2 others to form the rock band the Police in his mid-20s, for which he was the chief songwriter, bassist and singer. The trio dyed their hair blonde and postured at punk, while performing pop exotica and reggae and also playing off their sultry good looks, in a style he called, “the sound of tension.” Toured America to establish a base and then started pumping out successful albums, while taking higher royalties in lieu of standard advances. After his marriage broke up, he hooked up with Trudie Styler, an actress, producer and former friend of his wife’s, 4 children from union. Extremely close family life, from which he draws his strength, particularly after the non-communicative upbringing he had. Did a world tour in 1980, and became one of the big bands of the early 1980s, while also working in a whole variety of musical genres, from jazz to reggae to world-beat, both in collaboration with others and with his own solo output, beginning in 1984, after the band broke up following a spectacular 7 year rise, thanks to bitter conflicts and completely disparate personalities amongst the three. Began appearing in films in his late 20s, with Quadrophenia, although his cinematic career has remained secondary to his musical interests. Strong supporter of environmental causes, particularly the Brazilian Rain Forest, despite his own overload of bio-mass devouring children. In 1992, he discovered his accountant had embezzled £6 million of his, although because of his excessive income and total lack of interest in the business side of his career, hardly noticed the loss. Lives in a rambling 300 year old house in north London, and also owns a number of other homes, in England, Italy and the U.S., as an inconspicuously conspicuous consumer. Winner of 16 Grammys, with record sales close to $100 million. Wrote his autobiography in 2003, “Broken Music.” Sued by a former cook for wrongful dismissal in 2007, who put a lie to his eco-friendly image, by describing a household awash in waste, and a wife who loves being treated like royalty. Reunited with the Police for the 2007 Grammys, after a two decade separation, in anticipation of a North American tour, then got caught replenishing his stinger in a high-priced brothel in Hamburg, Germany, as an affirmation of longheld rumors of a swinging lifestyle with his wife. Officially became a vintner in 2009, from his Tuscany estate and organic farm, Il Palagio, which he purchased in 1997. Made his Broadway debut as a composer with “The Last Ship,” revisiting his boyhood, where the lyrics did not match his vigorous score, nor were his collaborators up to par with his efforts, creating mixed reviews. Despite giving up royalties and joining the cast mid-way as star, the show only had a brief 3 month run. Has a net worth of around $300 million. Inner: Earnest, pensive, domestic and driven, with an instinctive knack for drawing attention to his abilities. Consistently inconsistent with virtually all his stances. Hair guitar lifetime of focusing on his alternate talent, using his hidden past as a basis for both performance and recognition, while reflecting the more aggressive and less sensitive side to his nature, through the nature of his choice of self-expression, the considerably less subtle sensibilities of rock’n’roll. vLeslie Howard (Leslie Howard Stainer) (1893-1943) - English actor, director, producer. Outer: Parents were Hungarian immigrants, father was a stockbroker’s clerk. His brother Arthur was a film actor as well. Educated at Dulwich College. 5’11”, with a slim, boyish figure. Became a bank clerk, then enlisted at the start of WW I. Suffered from shell shock on the Western front, resigned as a 2nd lieutenant, and as part of his therapy, took up acting. Appeared in a short silent, The Happy Warrior, in his early 20s, then made his professional stage debut in London. Married Ruth Martin, the daughter of a laundry manager at 23, son and daughter from the union, including actor Ronald Howard. Became a Broadway favorite, with his blonde, blue-eyed English charm, and with the advent of sound, established himself as the quintessential romantic Englishman in American films, ending his stage career in his early 30s. Occasionally did British fare, but the core of the rest of his career was fashioned in Hollywood, including a coveted role in the epic Gone With The Wind. A producer as well as a sometime director, he helped give Humphrey Bogart (Matthew Broderick) his first big Hollywood break, by refusing to star in The Petrified Forest without him, after the 2 had played in it together on Broadway. Devastated when an inamorata with whom he was desperately in love and having an affair, Violette Cunningham, suddenly died of pneumonia. At the start of WW II, he returned to England, joined British intelligence, and became both a producer and director there, as well as continuing his acting. Shot down by Nazi aircraft, while returning from Lisbon to England in the middle of the war, when it was thought Prime Minister Winston Churchill (Boris Johnson) was aboard his plane, because a double of his had boarded it. No bodies were ever recovered. His daughter wrote a loving biography of him. Inner: Sensitive and intellectual, as well as extremely shy and retiring, despite multi-talents. Shell-shocked lifetime of exploring his more sensitive, female side through a repressed personality, only to enter another plane through his symbolic exit, in order to give fuller expression to his more overtly male side the next time around in this series.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS UNDONE SUPERMAN:
Storyline: The deeply wounded warrior disconnects himself from his handsome body in order to heal his hidden scars and test his courage and perseverance against the challenge of becoming whole once again.

vChristopher Reeve (Christopher D”Oler Reever) (1952-2004) - American actor, writer, producer, director and activist. Outer: Father, Franklin Reeve, was a professor and writer, mother, Barbara Johnson, was a journalist. Older of 2 brothers. His parents divorced when he was 4. At 8, he began appearing in school plays, which compensated for his sense of losing his forbears. At 15, he started his theatrical apprenticeship at the Williamstown Theater Festival. Educated at Cornell Univ. then studied drama at the Juilliard School in NYC, sharing an apartment with then-unknown Robin Williams. 6’4” with dark brown hair and blue eyes as well as handsome and athletic. Played at London’s Old Vic, and also appeared with the Comedie Francaise, after acting in a small screen soap opera, “Love of Life.” Made his Broadway debut in 1976 in “A Matter of Gravity,” then effected his film debut in his mid-20s in Grey Lady Down. Rose to prominence, after being selected from 200 candidates, with the title role in Superman in 1978, and its successful follow-ups, performing his own stunts in all of them. In his 20s, he had a son and a daughter with modeling executive Gae Exton, whom he met while shooting the first Superman. After divorcing, he married singer and actress Dana Morosini, In 1992, one son. An avid rider, but in 1995, he fractured his 1st and 2nd cervical vertebrae in an easy jump on his horse, Eastern Express. His hands became entangled in the bridle and he couldn’t break his fall. Wound up paralyzed from the neck down, superman undone. Deeply depressed afterwards to the point of contemplating suicide, but he tapped into his own strong inner reserve, as well as his wife’s steadfast support, and slowly began to try to rehabilitate himself, becoming a spokesman, lobbyist and symbol of his debilitating injury. In spite of his infirmity and grueling rehabilitation, as well as needing a respirator to breathe, he began doing voiceovers and directing again, beginning with TV’s “In the Gloaming,” in 1997. Despite pessimistic medical prognostications, he vowed he would walk again, turning that fantasy into a projected reality by appearing in a computer-enhanced commercial during the 2000 Superbowl, showing him fully ambulatory. Established the Paralysis Foundation, which funded research on regenerating injured spinal cords, raising some $46 million, while serving as an inspiration for others, through writing, appearances and documentaries. Further experimentation returned his sense of smell, as well as freed him for his ventilator, while also giving him use of his right wrist and the fingers of his left hand. Eventually succumbed to cardiac arrest, and died after falling into a coma. Cremated with his ashes given to his family.. His wife succumbed a year and a half later to breast cancer, after insuring his legacy would continue. Wrote his autobiography, “Still Me,” in 1998. Inner: Good-humored, courageous and ultimately optimistic. Unconscious imitation of earlier self-destructive superman, George Reeves, who killed himself because he couldn’t professionally transcend his one character. Deeply wounding lifetime of suffering disconnection from a handsome athletic body, in order to try to heal himself of his own hidden vulnerabilities through dint of his personal courage and perseverance, Thomas Meighan (1879-1936) - American actor. Outer: From a large Irish-American family. One of 6 children. Wanted to be a doctor and went to St. Mary’s College, but was distracted by an equal draw towards the stage. Made his acting debut in “Mistress Nell,” in his late teens. 6’1”, and well-built. Became a noted Broadway figure around the turn of the century. In his late 20s, he married Frances Ring, one of his costars, and a member of an acting family, no children. The union was kept a secret initially, because he didn’t want to upset their fans. Entered films in his mid-30s, but was initially appalled at his first look at movie/making with casual bystanders gawking at the proceedings. Also didn’t care for rising early, preferring the late-night life of the stage. Stubbornly held out from demeaning himself, but after acting in London, he finally made his film debut in his mid-30s in Dandy Donovan. His celluloid image proved highly palatable to fans and within a few years he was a star, playing mature, dependable heroes during the silent era, and then switching entirely to film as a means of actorly expression during the advent of sound. Had an alcohol problem, although did not drink while he was working. Easily able to make the switch to sound, and continued as a leading man until a bronchial ailment ended his career. Died from a bronchial obstruction and cancer. Inner: Simple tastes, good-humored, saw himself as a true artist, and acting as a business, while hiding his scars from himself through the balm of alcohol. Side-stepping lifetime of satisfying his own sense of self through the stage, rather than as a healer, before taking on a far more difficult role the next time around, in an attempt to heal his whole being through being totally disconnected from his body.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS ONGOING EXPRESSIONIST:
Storyline: The off-beat odd-ball goes for the baroque in his cinematic characterization tastes, while playing out his unusual interior in a multiple-lifetime career dedicated to celebrating his own off-the-wall sensibilities.

vJeff Goldblum (Jeffrey Lynn Goldblum) (1952) - American actor, painter and musician. Outer: Father was a Jewish internist, who was extremely abusive, both beating and threatening to beat his children to constantly keep them in line. Mother was in broadcasting. 3rd of 4 children, with a sister and two brothers, including an older brother who died of kidney failure when he was 23. A jazz pianist at a local lounge while still in high school, he also participated in the Carnegie-Mellon theater program, although was turned down by the university when he later applied. 6’4”, lanky and bespectacled, with dark brown hair and eyes. With the support of both his parents, he went to NYC, where he trained at the Neighborhood Playhouse. Also spent many years in therapy in order to deal with his upbringing. Made his professional debut the following year in one of producer Joseph Papp’s productions of Shakespeare in the Park. Began playing small roles both on and off-Broadway, and made his film debut in his early 20s as a mugger in Death Wish. Married Patricia Gaul, an actress in 1980, divorced 6 years later. Failed in first TV series attempt with “Tenspeed and Brown Shoe,” the same year. By the mid-1980s, he had established himself as a lead, most notably in the remake of The Fly, where he transmogrified into a giant insect, and later married his co-star, Geena Davis in 1987, although the duo divorced 3 years later. After playing in some very strange movies, he finally did his first blockbuster, Jurassic Park some 20 years into his career, and 2 years later directed his first short. An avid painter as well as acting teacher at a workshop he co-founded, Playhouse West, with an affinity for off-beat characterizations. Also plays piano with his 5-piece jazz combo, the Mildred Snitzer Orchestra, comprised of students of his at PW. The band was named after a family friend, and backs him up in his weekly stints at an east Hollywood club, where he both riffs and raps. Returned to Broadway in 2005 with “The Pillow Man,” while also doing TV to complement his filmwork. Launched his third TV series in 2007, “Raines,” about a hallucinatory detective who speaks to dead victims, which failed, then decided the following year, to join the cast of the well-established series, “Law & Order: Criminal Intent.” In late 2014, he wed actress Emily Livingston, despite, or perhaps because of the 30 year difference in their ages, one son from the union. Has a net worth of $40 million. Inner: Multi-talented trickster, with a slightly off-kilter overview. Serious and extremely self-disciplined. Enjoys fame, occasionally pointing himself out to tour buses while driving alongside them. Eccentric lifetime of continuing to explore his oddball sensibilities through the various media available, while purposefully incarnating in a religious heritage that ran totally counter to his earlier host country’s obsessions in this series of lives. vConrad Veidt (Hans Walter Conrad Veidt) (1893-1943) - German/English actor. Outer: Father, who was a civil servant, thought actors were gypsies and discouraged him from his chosen career. Raised in a working-class Lutherans hoe. A poor student, he never received a diploma. Acted at 17 for the first time and was always superstitious around that number. His first stage success and movie was made in 1917, his cabin number on coming to America was 17, and he died in a year adding up to 17. 6’3” and lanky. After he was conscripted into the German army in 1914, he developed jaundice and pneumonia on the eastern front following several months of active duty. and was ultimately declared unfit for duty. Used his off-time entertaining frontline troops, before being discharged. Earlier studied with German theatrical producer Max Reinhardt and made his stage debut at 20 at his mentor’s theater in Berlin. Entered films the following year, and soon became a noted figure in the early German expressionist movement, using his tall spare frame and gaunt high-cheekboned face to specialize in demonic and demented characters. Best remembered for his role as the somnambulist in the eerie The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari. His first marriage was to Gussy Holl in 1918, divorced a year later, and she went on to marry actor Emil Jannings (Willem Dafoe). Remarried Felicitas Radke in 1923, divorced in 1932, one daughter from the union. Had 2 careers in Hollywood, the first, at the end of the silent era, was largely insignificant. By his early 30s, he was a world famous movie figure, after his portrayals of both literary and his/storical characters, and came to Hollywood for a series of silent films. With the advent of sound, he returned to Germany, but when the Nazis rose to power, he went into exile with his 3rd wife, Ilona Praeger, who was 1/2 Jewish. Returned the following year, but was held by the Nazis under the pretext that he was too ill to travel. The ploy almost created an international incident, before his British employers sent over a team of doctors to rescue him. Became a British citizen in 1939, and the following year went to Hollywood, where, ironically, he played a series of Nazis, most memorably in the classic film, Casablanca. Died of a heart attack while playing golf. Inner: Generous, good athlete, intuitive rather than cerebral. Eccentric lifetime, once again, of close identification with off-beat characters, while centering his career in a country that looked askance at nonconformists.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS HYPHENATED ENTERTAINER:
Storyline: The short-sighted singer actualizes his ultimate vision of being taken seriously as a triple threat trouper, after earlier having been marginalized as an amusing footlit lightweight.

vMandy Patinkin (1952) - American singer/actor. Outer: Of Russian-Jewish descent. Grandfather founded a scrap metal company for which his father worked. Named after his grandfather, and raised in a conservative religious atmosphere. One older sister At 9, he began singing in a synagogue and made his debut in his teens in a YMHA play, while also appearing in a 7-Up commercial. Attended the Univ. of Kansas for 2 years, and then was classically trained at the Juilliard School of Drama in NYC, although also left after 2 years, with no desire to get a degree. 6’ 3/4”, with dark brown hair and eyes. Traveled in Europe, then did bit parts off-Broadway. Connected himself to the NY Shakespeare Festival for 6 years, and made his Broadway debut in his late 20s in “Shadow Bow,” and his film debut in 1978 in The Big Fix. Never learned to read music, but had a natural aptitude for musical theater and quickly carved a name for himself as a Tony award winning ‘Che’ Guevera in the stage musical “Evita,” in 1980. Married actress Karyn Grody in 1980, 2 sons from union. Has since pursued a busy dual career on stage and screen as well as TV, as both a dramatic and a musical actor. Had a one-man show in 1989, “Mandy Patinkin on Broadway: Dress Casually,” and won further acclaim for “Falsettos.” Extremely active on stage, allowing film and TV to be secondary to his desire for direct performance. From his late 20s, he has suffered from a degenerative eye disease, which was finally operated on to replace his right and then left corneas, after 15 years of dimming sight. Became a medical star of TV’s “Chicago Hope,” in his late 40s, for which he won an Emmy, although he left the show because of the weekly grind of a TV series, and then returned several years later in hopes of reviving its sinking ratings, while continuing his active profession on all levels. As his career has progressed, he has tended to lose himself so much in his characters, that he begins to exhibit their pathological excess, in his ongoing struggle to find his own true center. Eventually modulated his excesses, including his over-the-top concert performances, in order to try to balance himself out on all levels. In 2005, after a failed series, he returned to TV with a well-received vehicle, “Criminal Minds,” as an FBI profiler, although suddenly bowed out of it giving no reason, after several successful seasons. Has largely worked on the small screen since then, including the hit series, “Homeland.”The author of a children’s book, and musical CD, “Dooey Dewit Helps Owlie Fly Again,” in an unconscious reference to his own ongoing healing through high-flying work, with the promise of more of the same to come. Inner: Intense, emotional, with a preference for live audiences and stagework to TV and movies. Extremely vulnerable while performing. Electric train enthusiast, and political activist, although compartmentalizes it from his professional life. Muddied sight lifetime of dealing with his vision on numerous levels, and his need to truly see himself through the greasepaint and the roar of the crowds, rather than his own inner vision. vWilliam deWolfe Hopper (William D’Wolf Hopper) (1858-1935) - American singer/actor. Outer: Mother was from a prominent Rhode Island family, father was a Quaker lawyer who died when son was 6. Only child, indulged by his mother. At 15, he acted for a church benefit, although had no real desire for a stage career. Read law in the office of a friend of his father’s, but at 20, acted in an amateur show, and drew the manager’s attention. His mother gave him money to support a road tour and the following year, he came into his inheritance, which he used to finance his own company. The lawyer for whom he had worked was greatly relieved at his change in careers, since he had shown little legal aptitude. Briefly appeared with Harrigan & Hart (Jackie Gleason and Art Carney), and then studied singing. Sang in Madison Square Garden, which led to a role in light opera, although his real ambition was to sing in grand opera. Felt, however, he was ‘ticketed for life’ in light roles. Over 6’, with a powerful voice. Recited the poem, “Casey at the Bat,” in 1888, and then was forced to repeat it at virtually every subsequent performance he gave, estimating some 10,000 recitals over his career. Sang for 5 years, and acted as an eccentric comedian with a rich bass voice. Became a star in 1890 in “Castles in the Air,” and finally achieved his long-sought fame with “Wang.” Worked with comedians Weber & Fields (Steve Martin and Martin Short), then went back to singing. In 1911, he began his association with Gilbert & Sullivan operettas over several seasons, playing 12 different roles in their repertory. Noted for his clear enunciation. Had an odd affliction where he lost all his body hair. Made 2 silent pictures in 1915 in Hollywood, although did not translate well to the screen. Married 6 times, beginning with his cousin, Ella Gardiner, with whom he had one son. After divorcing her, he wed Ida Mosher with whom he had another son, then Edna Wallace, a much younger actress. After divorcing her, he wed Nella Bergen, an Englishwoman, at century’s end, which lasted until 1913. The same year, he wed future columnist Hedda Hopper (Chelsea Handler). Their son, William Hopper, became an actor. His final wife, Lulu Glaser, who he wed in 1925, survived him, and all his divorces were amicable, save for the first. Toured towards the end of his life with a radio broadcast and died shortly after making one. Inner: Born performer with a strong sense of self-confidence, thanks in large part to the adoring audience of his mother. Never able to replicate their relationship in any of his many marriages. Encased-at-the-bat lifetime of enjoying a long lightweight career, when he probably would have been much more fulfilled in being taken as a serious artist, an oversight he addressed in his next go-round in this series, with a far deeper and well-crafted talent.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS DEFT ARTISTE:
Storyline: The arch esthete adopts his adept theatrical sensibilities to any and all modes offered him, re-creating himself as such a thoroughly unique entertainment presence that he can actually be integrated, not above or below, but directly into movie titles.

vJohn Malkovich (John Gavin Malkovich) (1953) - American actor, director and producer. Outer: Grandmother was the publisher of a local newspaper and a strong influence in his life. His mother became a newspaper owner through her, via the Benton Evening News. His father was an environmentalist, and the head of the State Conservation Department. 2nd of 5, 3 sisters and a brother, 2 of whom went into the newspaper business. Given to temper tantrums as a child, and often was locked out of the house, in a symbolic teaching of learning how to rechannel his emotions. Difficulties with his mother, close to father, constantly beat up by his older brother, who eventually took over the family paper. Also heavyset as a child, later slimmed down on a pure Jell-o diet when he attended Illinois State Univ., to pursue his father’s work. 6’1”. Became involved, instead, in school productions, initially because of an attraction to a female drama student. In 1976, with several college friends, he formed Steppenwolf Ensemble in Chicago, and spent the next 7 years serving his stage apprenticeship with the group, as well as later returning to work with them, after his individual success. Won numerous acting awards, including an Obie in 1983 in his off-Broadway debut playing one of 2 brothers in Sam Shepard’s “True West,” and the following year did a noticeable turn as Biff in “Death of a Salesman,” winning an Emmy for his efforts. At the same time, he made his screen debut in Word of Honor and quickly established himself as a strong celluloid presence, with an intense facility at getting to the heart of his characterizations. His bald pate also enables to him re-create himself from head to foot in a wide variety of roles, from hero to villain. Married actress and fellow Steppenwolfer Glenne Headly in 1982. She later referred to him as “the root of all evil,” when they were divorced 8 years later. Married Nicoletta Peyran in 1990, after she was 2nd assistant director on Under the Sheltering Sky, daughter and son from union. Did Con Air for the money, and found a lucrative niche for loathsome criminals, although soon tired of them, and formed Mr. Mudd, a production company, as well as Mrs. Mudd, a clothing design company. The former was named after a chauffeur he had in one of his earlier films, whose philosophy was, “Sometime Mr. Mudd kill. Sometime Mr. Mudd not kill,” which he found to be a perfect epigram for an entertainer’s relationship with his or her audience. With an eclectic array of roles under his belt, he was enough of a public figure to play a celluloid version of himself in Being John Malkovich, a role that underscored his unique status as a notable presence on the American screen. Made his cinematic directorial debut in the late 1990s, after 8 years of searching for the financing, with the well-received Dancer Upstairs, a political drama. Moved to the south of France in the mid-1990s, with his family, to escape his resultant celebrityhood, and oversaw every aspect of his home’s detailed design, although a contretemps with the French government made his stay there questionable, and he moved back to the U.S. 14 years later. Has remained busy on both the large and small screen since his return. Has a net worth of $65 million. Inner: Intense, edgy, extremely non-Hollywood. Voracious reader, apolitical, artist to the core, with a vile temper, and a great belief in sheer luck. Also courteous, soft-spoken and considerate, in contrast with his screen image, although the possessor of a gigantic ego and strong esthetic sensibilities in virtually every arena. Egomaniacal esthete’s lifetime of enjoying being John Malkovich, after experiencing a childhood dedicated to erasing his innate sense of insufferability, in order to make him more of an accessible stage and screen presence. vRudolph Schildkraut (1862-1930) - Romanian/American actor. Outer: Of Jewish descent. Educated in Vienna and Berlin. Joined a touring company at the age of 14, and eventually worked his way to the stage of Vienna. Married Ema Weinstein, a Hungarian woman, son Joseph Schildkraut (John Cusack), also became a well-known actor. Oversaw his scion’s education in a variety of the arts, and even permitted him to study with his arch-rival. Traveled the world in touring groups, and became a star of Max Reinhardt’s Berlin stage company, while also appearing in German films. Asked to convert to Christianity in 1911, which caused him to leave Germany and ultimately emigrate to the United States in the mid-1920s, where he continued his career on Broadway and the Yiddish Theater, as well as American silent films, playing character leads, most notably as Shylock in the Yiddish version of “The Merchant of Venice.” Made his acting debut in English in 1922 in Sholem Asch's "God of Vengeance." His strong German accent limited his Broadway access, as well as the roles given him. Also owned and managed a small Yiddish theater in the Bronx. Died of a heart attack at the home of his son. Inner: Highly cultured, with an all-abiding love of craft. Bi-cultural lifetime of gaining a thorough European grounding in the theater, before coming to the New World to accept the challenge of performing in an alien tongue.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS PARAGON OF NORMALCY:
Storyline: The cuddly child star turned clear-headed director manages to retain his strong sense of domestic self, by refusing to immerse himself in the usual Hollywood effluvia while maintaining a distance between his personal and professional life.

vRon Howard (1954) - American actor/director/producer. Outer: Parents were both stage performers, who had met in the theater department of the Univ. of Oklahoma. Their son made his initial debut with them at the age of 18 months in Baltimore, under the name Ronny Howard. His younger brother, Clint Howard, also took to the stage and screen as a child. Made his first screen appearance the following year, and then carved out an early Hollywood career for himself as a cute, blond-haired child actor. Became a TV star at 7, playing Opie Taylor on “The Andy Griffith Show,” for 8 seasons, then returned to the Hollywood screen, before assaying teenager Richie Cunningham on the sitcom “Happy Days,” for an additional 6 seasons, using the name Ron Howard. Despite initially being the star, gave way to the supporting character of ‘the Fonz,’ played by Henry Winkler, and was able to adjust to the audience’s preference. 5’9”, with red hair. His parents tried to give him a normal childhood by enrolling him in public schools. Holds a lifelong fascination with the Depression, and in high school made a 30 minute documentary on it for a social studies class. Married Cheryl Alley, a high-school classmate, at 23, 4 children from the union, including actress Bryce Dallas Howard. Insisted his children also have a non-show business upbringing, and not enter it until they were adults, if they were so inclined. Directed his first film in his mid-20s, from a script he co-wrote with his father, Grand Theft Auto, in which he also starred, and by the 1980s, he turned to directing fulltime, with several hits to his credit, including Splash and Backdraft. Formed Imagine Films Entertainment with a longtime friend, and has enjoyed continued success in a number of different genres, ultimately getting $10 million per film. Despite his strong show business roots, he has stayed rooted on the East Coast in Connecticut, preferring the normalcy of a non-Hollywood life. Won an Academy Reward for Best Director for A Beautiful Mind in 2002. Also continued working in TV as a producer and narrator of “Arrested Development.” In spite of a reputation as a lightweight, he has been willing to tackle all subjects that interest him with a depth that his gentle persona belies, while pulling in over a billion dollars in the first 30 years of his career. In 2006, he directed the controversial The Da Vinci Code, to universal panning, although his midas touch extended to its reception as well, as it did its prequel sequel, Angels and Demons. Did shorts afterwards and worked as an actor on the multi-season series “Arrested Development,” before helming his first real bomb in 2015 with In The Heart of the Sea, a tale based on true events that led to the writing of “Moby Dick.” The following annum he returned to form, directing the documentary The Beatles: Eight Days a Week which covered their unprecedented four years of touring, a semi-improvised multimedia affair which turned them into a giant public spectacle amidst endless public scrutiny. Has a net worth of $140 million. Inner: Slightly shy, regular fellow, and strong family man. Despite early fame, never let it distort his own sense of himself. Diligent, meticulous and methodical. Level-headed lifetime of enjoying very early success, and remaining centered around it, with his priorities very much in order, allowing him to continually expand his sense of craft. vHarry Pollard (1879-1934) - American actor/director and screenwriter. Outer: His family migrated to California from Kansas, and he was brought up on a ranch, showing himself to be a good athlete, and a good rider. 5'10". At 18, he secured a minor position with a San Francisco theater, and became a lead in stock companies. Married actress Margarita Fischer, and toured with her in vaudeville, while she would later star in many of his films. No children from the union, while his wife would outlive him by three decades. Switched to that medium when he joined the Selig Company. Made his cinematic acting debut in 1912 in The Worth of a Man, and then shortly afterwards, he inaugurated his directing career with a short, Nothing Shall Be Hidden, and went on to enjoy a near two-decade run behind the camera, fading out in the early sound era. Ultimately was involved in over 300 productions. Died after several weeks of illness. Inner. Open and straightforward, with nothing hidden as his means of assessing his self-worth. Level-headed lifetime of integrating his family life directly with his career, so as to have a sense of normalcy in an environment that has traditionally inspired the opposite.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS ENNOBLING STAR:
Storyline: The virtuous realist acts as a man with a mission to level the cultural playingfield for one and all, after earlier having compromised some of his principals in a pioneering effort to do the same.

vDenzel Washington (Denzel Hayes Washington, Jr.) (1954) - American actor, producer and director. Outer: Of African/American descent. His great grandparents were born into slavery. Mother was a former gospel singer who became a beautician and ultimately owned several beauty parlors, father was a Pentecostal minister. The former was urban and very religious, the latter was her opposite, rural, but equally filled with spirit. 2nd of 3 children. Grew up in a multi-racial neighborhood. His hard-working parents kept a tight rein on him, with his father only allowing the children to watch Biblical epics or animated Disney features. His parents, however, divorced when he was 14. Extremely angry over the division, he began getting into fights, until his mother enrolled him at a prep school. Good athlete, albeit an indifferent student. Journalism major at Fordham Univ. 6’, handsome and muscular. Was flunking out of school, when a woman from his mother’s church who had the gift of prophecy, saw him speaking to millions, which stirred him. Discovered acting while working in the summer at a YMCA camp. Starred in a Fordham student production of Eugene O’Neill’s “Emperor Jones,” then gave an extremely impressive performance in “Othello,” touching on the rage and passion of the classical role. As a senior, he got his first professional part in a made-for-TV film, “Wilma,” where he met his future wife. Graduated with a degree in journalism and drama, then joined ACT in San Francisco for a year, before heading to LA and then back to NYC, where he worked with a number of black theater companies. Despite being desperate for work, he turned down stereotypical pimp and pusher roles, refusing to play degraded characters. Played Muslim martyr Malcolm X in a short-lived play, then joined the Negro Ensemble Co., where he did “A Soldier’s Play,” and later reprised his role in the filmed version, A Soldier’s Story. In 1981, he joined the cast of TV’s “St. Elsewhere,” playing a Yale-educated doctor, which brought him to national attention.Married singer and actress Pauletta Pearson, 2 years later, two sons and two daughters from the union in a close-knit family. Made his Broadway debut in 1988 with “Checkmates.” Began to draw more notice in the late 1980s with his role as activist Steve Biko in Cry Freedom, and as a soldier in Glory, a Civil War drama. His breakthrough came in the title role of Spike Lee’s Malcolm X in 1992, and he has been a solid star ever since, although has not been able to carry African-American oriented films into the stratosphere of big hits, a situation that bothers him deeply. Made his directorial debut in 2001 with The Antwone Fisher Story, in which he also starred, although found the dual role too taxing for his perfectionist standards. Won an Academy Reward for Best Actor for Training Day in 2002. In 2005, he decided to test his actorly chops by taking on the role of Brutus in Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar,” although won mixed reviews for his efforts. Did better in 2010 in a revival of August Wilson’s “Fences,” stepping into the large shoes of James Earl Jones, who created the original character, a former Negro League baseball star, and acquitting himself quite creditably, while racking up $3 million in profits for the theater. Given the Cecil B. DeMille award at the 2016 Golden Globes. Later that year, he directed and starred in the first of a projected series of films based on the stage works of August Wilson, Fences, which he had earlier assayed on stage. Proved himself loyal to the playwright’s vision and got rave reviews all the way around, both in front of and back of the camera for his initial effort, while winning a SAG best actor’s award for it. Has a net worth of $140 million. Inner: Serious, purposeful, as well as warm, modest and unpretentious. Thoroughly dedicated lifetime of continuing his struggle to ennoble, those of African descent on the American screen, via his projected powerful emotional and physical presence upon it. Noble Johnson (1881-1978) - American actor. Outer: Of African/American descent. Father was a horse trainer on the racing circuit. Brother George became a scriptwriter and marketer of black films. Friend of Lon Chaney (Dustin Hoffman) in high school, who later aided him in Hollywood. Helped his father, then worked as a rancher and miner before heading out to Lotusland. Made his motion picture debut in 1909 in Mr. Carlson from Arizona. 6’2”, 225 lbs. Because of his light complexion, and skill with horses, he was able to land movie roles, but was deeply disturbed by the racism of Birth of a Nation, and the resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan from their heroic portrayal in the movie, and vowed to depict African-American life with dignity on film. Formed the Lincoln Motion Picture Co. in 1916 with his brother, and created their first feature that year, The Realization of a Negro’s Ambition, in which he played the principle role. His brother wrote and marketed their films, while he starred in them, and they were rented to houses geared for black audiences. After the end of WW I, and the great influenza epidemic, when theaters closed by the score, their fortunes plummeted, although moviegoers began coming back to exhibitions afterwards. Desiring a steadier paycheck, he quit the company in 1920 and began working for Universal Studios, although managed to stay on close terms with his disappointed sibling. The Lincoln company went out of business 2 years later, while he continued working in supporting roles for the major studios over the next 3 decades, including the ignoble task of playing zombies in horrorfests of the 1940s, before finally retiring in 1950, after which time his whereabouts remain largely unrecorded, although he lived until nearly 100. Married twice. Inner: Handsome, dignified and well-named in his noble pursuit of creative justice. Partially principled lifetime of serving as a pioneer in raising racial consciousness through the newborn medium of motion pictures, before focusing on his own needs in more conventional and less noble environs, and then disappearing entirely, as befit an invisible man of the times.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS QUINTESSENTIAL SOUTHERN CALIFORNIAN:
Storyline: The hyphenated hunk makes his own field of dreams a reality, while surfing the unpredictable waves of success and failure and maintaining his modest sense of loner self in the process.

vKevin Costner (Kevin Michael Costner) (1955) - American actor, director, producer and musician. Outer: Of Irish, German and Cherokee descent. Father’s family had come from an Oklahoma farm to Southern California during the Depression. His progenitor worked for Southern California Edison, while his mother labored for the state welfare department. One older brother, and one brother who died at birth. The family moved frequently in SoCal because of his father’s job, so that he wound up attending 12 schools. Always had a love the outdoors. Good athlete, who sang in a church choir, but had only one date in high school, because of his innate shyness. 6’1”, 170 lbs., with blond hair and blue eyes. Drove a truck, worked as a deck hand, and framed houses. While pursuing a marketing degree at California State, Fullerton, he joined a community theater group, after a chance airborne meeting with actor Richard Burton, who told him he needed to act fulltime if he wanted to give filmdom a full chance. Graduated and married his college classmate, Cindy Silva, in his early 20s. Surprisingly, she would be the only woman he ever dated, 3 children from the union. Worked briefly in marketing before deciding to pursue acting fulltime. Got bit parts, and also often wound up on the cutting room floor. Played the corpse in the opening sequence of The Big Chill, before finally achieving star status in his early 30s as straight-arrow Elliot Ness in The Untouchables. His career took off immediately afterwards, and he became one of Hollywood’s most desirable and best-paid hunks with uplifting fare such as Field of Dreams. Formed his own production company, TIG, and made a notable debut as director with Dances With Wolves, which won 7 Academy Rewards in 1990, including Best Picture and Best Director. Followed that up with Robin Hood, Prince of Thieves, in which his English accent quickly gave way to his California drawl. The 1990s saw several spectacular failures on high-budget films, including two apocalyptic works, Waterworld and The Postman, in which he saved the future but failed to impress present time audiences. Despite his high profile fiascos, he continued to be a bankable star. His 16 year marriage crumbled during the early 1990s, and he paid out a $40 million settlement, then was connected with a bevy of beauties, and begot a son by the grand/daughter of the founder of the Pittsburgh Steelers. Plays acoustic guitar with his own 6 piece eponymous band, and has also had some failed efforts at environmental entrepreneurship. A quintessential Southern Californian, he relies more on his solid presence than any great depth to his acting, although is able to project a likable, down-to-Earth sensibility that allows him the leeway of flops in his up-and-down later career. After struggling with a fear of commitment for six years, he married his longtime girlfriend, Christine Baumgartner, in 2004, but on his honeymoon in Scotland, he exposed himself and played grab-ass with a masseuse, further dampening his public image. Two sons and a daughter from the union, making for seven children all told. Admitted to spending some $40 million on green investments and projects, and seeing little green for himself out of them, before having a score of his centrifuge machines accepted for clean-up in the 2010 Gulf oil spill. Has a net worth of $150 million. Inner: Shy, reserved loner who prefers to stay hidden from public view, despite his high-profile impact on the screen. Quintessential Californian lifetime of enjoying both spectacular success and failure, and learning how to ride the waves of each, while trying to keep his own sense of balance in between, despite breeches in his behavior towards women Hobart Bosworth (1867-1943) - American actor, director and producer. Outer: A direct descendant of early Puritan Miles Standish (Prescott Bush) Humble upbringing, largely illiterate, with little schooling. His mother died, and he hated the woman his father married. Ran away to sea at 12, and worked as a cabin boy on an American merchant marine ship for 3 years. Originally wanted to be a painter. Spent all his money on books, which he used to educate himself. 6’1”, over 200 lbs. Tried to make a go of it as a painter, and at 18, began acting to supplement his art, while studying Elizabethan drama. Became a member of Augustin Daly’s (Aaron Spelling) stock company and had several starring stints on Broadway. Contracted tuberculosis in his early 30s, losing 70 pounds in 10 weeks, and moved to Arizona where he lived in a hammock out in the open. Lost much of his voice to the disease, but through outdoor, healthy living, he was able to cure himself. Came to Los Angeles, and became the director of a national theatrical company, then was one of the first legitimate stage actors to go the route of the burgeoning silver screen, when he entered films in his early 40s, starring in the West Coast’s inauguratory shoot, The Count of Monte Cristo in 1908. The following year, he did The Power of the Sultan, which was filmed in a Chinese laundry so that the backdrops could be hung on clotheslines. Became one of Hollywood’s first stuntmen, while doing outdoorsy adventure films. Did numerous one-reelers, which he directed and produced, and also wrote screenplays for others. Reeled in some $4 million for the $9000,The Sea Wolf, a Jack London (Jack Kerouac) tale, that he produced, directed and starred in, which enabled him to start his own state-of-the-art eponymous studio. Spent more than a decade as a Hollywood star, while overseeing one of Tinsel Town’s first film factories. Married and divorced Adele Farrington, an actress, by his early 50s, then married Cecile Kibre, the widow of an art director the following year, and adopted her son. Rented a hotel suite, rather than living in his own home. Switched to supporting roles in his 50s, and remained active in films until his mid-70s. Spent his spare time painting from nature. Died of pneumonia. Made over 250 films, as well as directing another 40 in the silent era, while also producing around a dozen in the same era. Inner: Gentle, kindly, heroic. Brush-in-hand lifetime of reinventing himself through self-education into one of the early renaissance men of Hollywood, in his ongoing evolution as a handsome, quasi-wholesome artist, with himself as his favorite canvas.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS FORMERLY POLITICALLY INCORRECT STAR:
Storyline: The tragic tragedian suffers the slings and arrows of political fortune, before returning in more accepting form to reclaim his mantle as an artist of unusual dimensions and ability.

vWillem Dafoe (William Dafoe, Jr.) (1955) - American actor. Outer: Of English, Irish, Scottish, German, Swiss and French ancestry. Father was a surgeon, mother was a nurse. Took on the Dutch version of his name, Willem, as a child so that he wouldn’t be called Billy. Given the freedom to find himself by his parents. Dropped out of the Univ. of Wisconsin and joined an experimental theatrical troupe called Theatre X, serving his apprenticeship in avant-garde improvisation. Toured both the U.S. and Europe with them, before eventually settling in NYC at 22, where he joined another experimental crew, the Wooster Group, and spent half his career with them. Married its director, Elizabeth Lecompte, one son from union, later divorced. 5’9 1/2”, with an unusual high-cheekboned face and full lips, making him a natural visual villain, although equally capable of heroic turns. Began his film career in his late 20s with Loveless, often playing demented young men and heavies, before scoring his breakthrough role as a Vietnam sergeant in Platoon. The following year, he played an extremely flawed Jesus Christ in Martin Scorsese’s Last Temptation of Jesus, and has continued with unusual character leads in a variety of films, playing off his broad-faced ability to project both good and evil, while maintaining his theatrical ties. Especially impressive as Nosferatu in The Shadow of the Vampire, unconsciously harkening back to his earlier roots. In 2005, he married Italian actress, Giada Colagrande, who was some 20 years his junior. Continually in demand for his off-beat portrayals. Has a net worth of $24 million. Inner: Keeps his private life to himself. Anti-analytic, preferring to find his characterizations in the moment of playing them. Reactive rather than reflective, and extremely generous in his ability to inspire his fellow actors. Resurrection lifetime of repeating his earlier European stage education and then focusing on his craft, rather than allowing political considerations to totally subsume his career, as he did in the past. vEmil Jannings (Theodore Friedrich Emil Janenz) (1886-1950) - German actor. Outer: Father was American-born, mother was German. Grew up in a comfortable German middle-class home, although ran away at 16 to become a sailor. Served as an assistant cook on a liner twixt England and Germany, but disliked the work and returned home before discovering that his true vocation was acting. Became a professional at 18, touring with a number of stage companies in the German provinces before joining producer Max Reinhardt’s Berlin theater in his early 20s, and establishing himself as a praised stage presence. Made his screen debut in German films 6 years later, although it took him five years before he began establishing an international reputation by doing a number of pseudo/his/storical dramas with a German twist to them, as well as literary adaptations. Powerfully built and magnetic. By the mid-1920s, he was widely seen as the world’s greatest silent screen actor. Signed a contract with Paramount in 1927 and came to Hollywood, which exploited his reputation as a brilliant tragedian, giving him roles of solid citizens corrupted by sin. In 1928, he won the very first Best Actor Oscar for his first 2 silent American efforts, The Last Command and The Way of All Flesh. As soon as Hollywood switched to sound, however, his thick German accent ended his American career. Returned to Germany, where he gave one of his most memorable performances as the professor degraded by his passion for Marlene Dietrich in The Blue Angel. When the Nazis rose to power in 1933, he was recruited as part of its propaganda machinery, and though he was not a party member, he enthusiastically supported their ideology, playing anti-British roles in their propaganda films. Made head of the company that produced his films in 1938, and 3 years later, he was honored as “Artist of the State.” His last film was halted by both illness and anguish over the coming Nazi defeat and he was forced into retirement, when he was subsequently black-listed by Allied authorities. Married 4 times, 3 of them actresses, including Hannah Ralph, Lucie Hoflich and Gussy Holl, one child from his first union, and divorced thrice. Died of cancer after 5 bitter and lonely years. Wrote his autobiography, “How I Got into Movies” in 1928. Inner: Memorable player who incorporated his own sense of tragedy into his life in an unconscious attempt at deepening his craft through direct experience. Politically incorrect lifetime of strong identification with the fatherland, enjoying the fruits of its rise to power and suffering the ignominy of its defeat, despite his own transcendental artistic skills.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS LATE BLOOMER:
Storyline: The reactivated return player disproves the old adage that there are no second acts in American lives.

Bryan Cranston (1956) - American actor and director. Outer: Of irish and German/Austrian descent. Mother, Audrey Sell, a radio actress, loved performing, but compromised her career hopes through marriage, and wound up being wed four times, while his father, Joe Cranston, who was an actor, married thrice. Had an older brother, Kyle, who also became an actor His sire walked out on the family when he was 10, and he didn’t see him for a decade, making for an insecure growing up, including living on food stamps. Originally wanted to be a policeman, and got an associate degree in police science from LA Valley College, while also taking theater courses, in which a passionate kiss from a student-actress proved to be only pretending on her part, which floored him, but also hooked him on the possibility of a career in front of the camera. Took a two year traveling trip afterwards with his brother on a motorcycle, doing odd jobs, and realized at the end of it, that his true passion was for acting. 5’10”, with light brown hair and green eyes. In 1977, he married Michaelle Middleton, divorced in 1982, no children form the union. In 1989, he wed actress Robin Dearden, one daughter from the union, Taylor Dearden, who became an actress. Did mostly TV series in his early career, with a turn as the father in the sit-com “Malcolm in the Middle” which ran from 2000 to 2006 as a highlight, and for which he directed several episodes, while appearing in much forgettable fare, other than very small roles in hits. Took quite a while to get his career in gear, before finding the role of a lifetime on the cable series “Breaking Bad,” from 2008 to 2013, where he played a high school chemistry teacher who learns he has terminal cancer, and begins making and dealing meth in order to leave his family some money, to ultimately become a drug lord over the six seasons of the popular show’s run, in a highly believable transformation from light to extremely dark. Won four Lead Actor in a Drama Series awards for the show, while becoming an instantly recognizable personality, rather than the long-term non-entity he had been. Took on the Broadway role of LBJ afterwards in “All The Way,” bringing many people to the theater who wouldn’t ordinarily come, thanks toubsequently won a 2014 Tony for Best Actor in a Play for his Johnson portrayal, and later a SAG award in 2017 for the TV version. Followed up the earlier portrayal in 2015 with a nice turn as blacklisted Hollywood screenwriter Dalton Trumbo in Trumbo. The following year he published his well-received memoir, “A Life In Parts.” Inner: Eminently likable, with little real interest in money, and much fascination with craft, allowing him to delve deeply into his characters, as a means of exploring himself as well. Always looks for good writing in the roles he can now afford to take, with cast and director secondary. Act two lifetime of reintegrating himself in two parts, with his previous existence focusing on childhood, and his second giving him the full power of middle-age and beyond as a full-blown star, finally to be reckoned with by the public. Donald Haines (1919-1943) - American actor and pilot. Outer: Father was a hotel electrician, mother was a restaurant cook. Had one older brother. The family moved to California shortly after their second son was born. Appeared in several of “Our Gang” shorts, beginning at the age of 11, as a largely peripheral character. Had an onscreen adversarial relationship with fellow child-star Jackie Cooper, which extended through numerous films over a decade period. Continued to work for Hal Roach Studios for the rest of his abbreviated career, which consisted of a mix of comedies and dramas during the 1930s, ending with Bowery Blitzkrieg in 1941, in which he reprised his East Side Kids role of Skinny for the sixth time. After Pearl Harbor, he signed up to become an Aviation Cadet in the Army Air Force, ultimately rising to First Lieutenant. On a combat mission, his plane went down over North Africa, although its exact crash site would remain a mystery. Inner: Act one lifetime of professionally focusing on childhood and early adulthood, as a preliminary means of re-integrating his larger self, before literally disappearing into another plane of himself, to return to focus on his middle-aged and older being, to far greater success.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS PUNISHMENT-PRONE PLAYER:
Storyline: The oft-wounded warrior takes his licks on a variety of fronts and keeps on ticking, thanks to an innate ability for rising from his own self-created battlefields, and accepting the healing grace of others.

vEric Roberts (1956) - American actor. Outer: From a theatrical family, father was a drama teacher, and mother ran the school they founded, the Actor’s and Writer’s Workshop, in Atlanta. Older brother of superstar Julia Roberts, although the duo have long been estranged. His younger sister Lisa Roberts also became an actress. Had a tenuous home environment, since his parents were forever short of money, and the school ultimately went bankrupt. Had a terrible stutter when he was young, nevertheless, was determined to be an actor, particularly since he overcame his disability with memorized lines, and his early stage experience served as much needed therapy for him. His parents divorced when he was in his early teens, and he went to live with his father, while his sisters joined their mother. Had a disjointed upbringing, afterwards, with virtually no contact with his mother. Got involved with drugs and alcohol early on, while frequently getting into fights, so that the only semblance of stability in his life was acting. 5’11” with dark brown hair and blue eyes. Close to his father, who managed to send him at 17 to the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London. Returned to continue his studies at the American Academy of Dramatic Art in NYC, but was impatient and left after a year to begin his career on the Off-Broadway stage. Also did TV soaps. Made his film debut in King of the Gypsies in 1978 to much acclaim, only to suffer the death of his father shortly afterwards from cancer. Despite his overt success, he continued his addictive ways, with alcohol, drugs and women, finding little solace in anything other than work, which consisted of dark, offbeat characterizations. Fathered a daughter, Emma Roberts, who became an actress, by actress Kelly Cunningham. In 1981, he lost control of a Jeep and ran into a tree, suffering brain trauma and multiple broken bones, and went into a coma for 3 days. His left hand ring finger, which symbolizes creativity, was also permanently disfigured. With memory loss, and his handsome features in disarray, he, nevertheless, was able to rebound with several stellar performances, only to earn the reputation of being difficult, making it harder and harder to get jobs, and he wound up in financial difficulty. Sank into grabbing anything offered him, as his reputation plummeted, while his sister’s conversely steadily rose. Managed to gain stability through a loving marriage to actress Eliza Garrett, and the birth of a daughter in the early 1990s. Entered a 12-step program, and has gradually resurrected himself, to become both the man and the actor he had always wanted to be, with a measure at last, of inner peace. Inner: Intense, self-destructive, but also with the capacity for seeing past his wounds. Self-regenerating lifetime of creating as much drama in his private life as his public portrayals, before finally re-integrating himself around the love he had earlier found missing from his familial female intimates. vLouis Wolheim (1880-1931) - American actor. Outer: Although listed as having been born in NYC, may have been born in Russian Poland, with both his parents immigrating around the time he was 8. One of two sons. Had a Jewish upbringing, eventually spoke fluent French, German, Spanish and Yiddish. 5/10 1/2”. Played halfback at Cornell Univ. Graduated with an engineering degree and taught for 6 years there as a mathematics instructor before taking to the Broadway stage. Squat, ugly, and rugged with a broken nose from his football days, which made him a perfect brute and thug on stage, despite his underlying intelligence. The original protagonist of Eugene O’Neill’s “The Hairy Ape,” and also later a friend of the playwright. Began his screen career in his mid-30s, playing brutish villains during the silent era, but is best remembered for his role as a sympathetic sergeant in All Quiet on the Western Front. Died of cancer the following year. Inner: Cerebral, with a need to hide his intelligence behind a tough-looking exterior. Hairy ape lifetime of looking quite the opposite of who he was, and playing to type, rather than himself, which was reflected in his most memorable screen role.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS ECLECTIC ETHNIC:
Storyline: The commedia dell’arte artist trades in his theatrical flamboyance for theatrical integrity, looking for the classical in the roots of ordinary reality, and bringing it to unusual life on both stage and screen as a purveyor of longtime traditions.

vJohn Turturro (John Michael Turturro) (1957) - American actor, writer and filmmaker. Outer: Of Sicilian descent. Father was a carpenter and construction worker, as well as an amateur boxer, who died of cancer in 1980. Mother was an amateur jazz singer. Middle of 3 brothers, younger sibling Nicholas also became an actor. Originally wanted to be a professional athlete, but broke his leg, turning him to his lifelong fascination with the theater, unconsciously acting out its good luck mantra of ‘break a leg.’ 6’, with dark brown hair and eyes. Went to the State Univ. of NY, then won a scholarship to the Yale School of Drama, where he received an MFA in Drama and met his wife, actress Katherine Borowitz, whom he married in 1985, 2 sons from union, Amadeo and Diego, both actors. Began appearing in regional theater and off-Broadway, winning an Obie in 1985 for “Danny and the Deep Blue Sea.” Made his film debut in 1980 in Raging Bull, and since then has become a favorite of both director Spike Lee and the Coen Brothers, assaying edgy urban roles, but equally adept at comedy. Co-scripted several plays, and also made his directorial debut in 1992, with a paean to his father, Mac, which he also co-wrote. Has worked with both his wife and son, most notably in Illuminata. Formed his own production company, Humperdinck Productions, and in 2005, he wrote and directed a highly unconventional musical, Romance and Cigarettes, which he penned in part on camera during his role as a blocked writer in the eponymous Barton Fink, an earlier Coen Brothers film. Far more interested in craft than conventional Hollywood fare, he is an unconscious throwback to the many European traditions he currently embodies, with the ability to give deep resonance to bit roles as well as star turns. In 2014, he released Faded Gigolo which he directed, starred in, and partially co-wrote with Woody Allen, fashioning a warm and sensitive, albeit occasionally silly look at passion and ethnic eccentricity. Has a net worth of over $20 million. Inner: Serious craftsman, but with a good sense of humor and a strong sense of his own humanity, which he readily projects into his eccentric characterizations. Craft-conscious lifetime of exploring himself and his intimates through the lens of make-believe in an ongoing pursuit of the theater as pure canvas for his own brand of personal art. vBoris Thomashevsky (1868-1939) Yiddish/American actor. Outer: Grandfather was a village cantor. Father had studied for the rabbinate, then disappeared into the Caucasus for 2 years, before returning to become a shopkeeper, and moving his growing family of 5 children to Kiev. The family took in actors, thanks to his father’s fascination with the theater, and gave his son the foundation for his career. As a child, he used to sing whole Yiddish services, to the astonishment of the congregation. When his father fell under suspicion for his radicalism after Alexander II’s (Steven Spielberg) assassination in 1881, the family emigrated to the U.S., where its progenitor became a shirt operator. Son got a job in a tobacco factory, then became an actor and showman in NY’s Yiddish Theater. Helped organize a Yiddish troupe, although fared poorly initially, then gradually built up a devoted public, while touring and employing members of his family. Discovered his wife, Bessie (Patricia Arquette), as a 14 year old seamstress, when she came backstage in a Baltimore theater, thinking he was a ‘she’ because of the role he had just played. She subsequently ran away from home to join his company and turned her into a noted actress, basing her routines on those of comedienne Fanny Brice (Ellen DeGeneres). The couple married in 1891, although he was continually unfaithful. Had a daughter who died from diphtheria at 6, then three sons from the union, with the eldest Harry, becoming an actor, writer and dialogue director. The second was involved in a murder/suicide attempt which left him paralyzed, and the third, a stage manager was the father of conductor Michael Tilson Thomas. Geared his vehicles to the immigrant masses, giving his audiences escapist stories of their homelands, or tales of workers adjusting to the new world with which they could identify. Although his music hall shund tales of life on the streets, were looked down upon by the Jewish literati, they had far more of a resonance with the truths of the lives of their audiences, than the ‘literary’ theater of more polished performers. Played the role of matinee idol to the hilt, taking his salary in gold, and being the first of the luminaries of the Yiddish stage to have a chauffeur-driven limousine, as well as a Japanese valet. Carried on a longtime affair with actress Regina Zuckerberg, who was the leading actress in a number of his theaters, and also modeled herself after Bessie, so as to be a younger version of her. He and his wife eventually parted ways acrimoniously, setting up competing theaters against one another, and writing accusatory autobiographies, although they never divorced. Failed in his attempt to bring Yiddish theater to Broadway, and was also unable to do English-speaking roles, freezing on the opening night of “The Singing Rabbi,” in the 1930s, after which he did Yiddish dinner theater. Had a heart attack and died in the middle of a performance. Bankrupt at the time, although his funeral was attended by thousands. Reunited with his wife in death as they were both buried in the Yiddish theater section of Mt. Hebron cemetery in NY. Inner: Flamboyant and self-worshipping, but also very much in touch with common tastes, while trying to act the uncommon celebrity purveyor of them, including sporting an $8000 pair of diamond-studded garters. Centerstage lifetime of gearing entertainment as a means of mass identification, while playing the self-anointed theatrical prince to his people.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS CARE-FILLED CRAFTSMAN:
Storyline: The Irish idealist uses the stage and screen as a platform of self-discovery, while serving as a solid support for creative group endeavors, be it personal, family or familial institutions.

vAidan Quinn (1959) - American actor. Outer: Parents were Irish immigrants, who came to America shortly before he was born. His childhood stretched from being on welfare to middle-class to poverty again, as the family moved back forth between Illinois and a farm in County Offaly. His father ultimately became a professor of English literature, specializing in Irish literature at Rock Valley College, while his mother was the family storyteller. One of 5 siblings, older brother, Declan, became a cinematographer, younger brother, Paul, became a writer/actor/director, and sister, Marian, an Irish actress. Instilled with high artistic standards by his father, as well as a love for literature. On returning to his native Chicago he became a roofer. 5’11 1/2”, and slim with light brown hair and blue eyes. Became involved in local theater, and made his film debut in his mid-20s in Reckless. With his large, languid eyes and a wide range of roles, he established himself as an off-beat lead and supporting player, often assaying parts where his protagonist battles himself as well as his adversaries. Preferring characterization to stardom, he has selected his parts carefully, and imbued them with an unusual sensitivity and vulnerability that reflects his own ongoing inner life. Married actress Elizabeth Bracco in 1987, 2 daughters from the union. The brothers got together in 1997 to do This Is My Father, an Irish self-discovery tale in which he played the lead. In 2006, he entered the ranks of small screen series as an Episcopal priest with family problems with, “The Book of Daniel,” a show that did not sit well with Christian conservatives. Inner: Intelligent, articulate, able to subsume himself in his roles. Enjoys getting into a semi-trance state, slowing his heartbeat and subsuming his existence to as close to non-existence as he can get it. Environmentalist and nature-lover. Self-searching lifetime of transposing his talents to American shores, while maintaining his integrity as a craftsman in search of himself through his ability to play the inner conflict of others. vDudley Digges (1880-1947) - Irish/American actor. Outer: Attended St. Mary’s College in Dublin, then studied theater under Frank J. Fay, before joining the Fay brothers’ Ormonde Dramatic Society. In 1902, he became one of the charter members of the Irish National Theater, under the direction of poet/playwright William Butler Yeats and Lady Isabella Gregory. Appeared in the premier of 2 of Yeats’s plays in its first season. Came to America and played at the Louisiana Purchase Expo in St. Louis, Mo. in 1904, although the trip proved to be a fiasco, when he argued over the inclusion of anti-Irish elements in the programming. Worked as a clerk in St. Louis, then made his American debut in NYC in George Bernard Shaw’s “John Bull’s Other Island.” Stayed in NYC for 3 years, married an Irish actress and spent the next 4 annums touring. From 1911 to 1917, he was a stage manager for the George Arliss (Ralph Fiennes) company. Had a better reputation with his colleagues than the general public. Helped found the American Theater Guild, and worked with the Guild from its inception until shortly before his death. His greatest role was the Guild’s 2nd production, “John Ferguson.” His was the only production organization to recognize the newly formed Actor’s Equity. Played many diverse roles, and after 1930, he expanded to non-Guild productions, while also doing over 3,000 Guild performances. In 1929, he made his film debut as a warden in Condemned, and then went on to play irascible, grandfatherly figures in movies. Played the bar owner, Harry Hope, in Eugene O’Neill’s “The Iceman Cometh,” and died of a stroke the following year. Inner: Possessor of a natural warmth and intelligence. Extremely group oriented, with an affinity for theatrical organizations. Transatlantic lifetime of being there at the beginning of various theatrical institutions, while showing a willingness to take a supportive role both on and off-stage for the betterment of the ongoing collective evolution of the stage.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS SOLID PLAYER RATHER THAN STAR:
Storyline: The slightly off-beat player looks to find himself in somewhat unconventional characterizations, eschewing empty big budget extravaganzas for the simple truths that lie in far more subtle vehicles.

vMatthew Modine (Matthew Avery Modine) (1959) - American actor and director. Outer: Father was a drive-in theater manager. Youngest of 7 children, and brought up mostly in Utah. His brother Mark would also become an actor. Mormon raised, the family moved every several years. 6’3” and rangy with blond hair and blue eyes. Moved to NYC after high school to study acting with Stella Adler, which led to commercials and a soap opera part. Worked as a chef at Au Natural, where he met his wife, Caridad Rivera. Married in his early 20s, son and a daughter from the union. The duo eventually divided their time between a NYC apartment and a 100 acre upstate NY farm. Made his movie debut in 1983 in Baby It’s You, then scored his first personal triumph the following year as a schizoid soldier who thinks he can fly in Birdy. In 1987, he starred in Stanley Kubrick’s Full Metal Jacket, and published a diary of it nearly 20 years later. Became an offbeat leading man in a steady stream of roles that have never carried him to unabashed stardom, but have made him a solid figure of the screen, always capable of an interesting performance. Made his directorial debut in 1993 with When I Was a Boy. Chooses his vehicles with care, with a preference for off-beat stories and interesting characterizations within them, rather than doing conventional fare. Has also acted and directed on Broadway, making his debut in the latter capacity with a revival of “12 Angry Men.” Inner: Likable, intelligent, and sensitive with good observational powers and a willingness to take on unconventional characters as reflection of himself. Avid horticulturist and skilled photographer. Exploratory lifetime of integrating himself to far better advantage as an unconventional portrayer of slightly off-kilter characters, and the potential for truth and beauty that they hold. vWarren William (Warren William Krech) (1895-1948) - American actor. Outer: Father was a newspaper publisher, comfortable upbringing. Began his career as a reporter, but after serving in the brutal front lines in France during WW I, he felt far more of a draw towards the fantasy life of the stage. Trained with the American Academy of Dramatic Arts and began to appear in stock, and under his real name, in silent films, beginning in 1922 in The Town that Forgot God. Also appeared in the serial Plunder, with serial queen, Pearl White (Meg Ryan). Initially played lecherous villains. Had a similar profile to John Barrymore (Johnny Depp), although his eyes were far more sensitive, sad and misplaced. Became a leading man on Broadway, then moved to Hollywood in the early 1930s. Despite his suavity, stage voice, and intelligence, he became trapped in B pictures, and his career stalemated, save for one exception, when he was allowed to roar as Julius Caesar (Charles de Gaulle) in Cecil B. DeMille’s epic Cleopatra in 1934. The rest of the time he was relegated to playing low-budget detectives, reporters and adventurers in a mostly forgettable career. Grew progressively weaker and died of multiple myeloma and blood disease. Inner: Urbane, intelligent and polished. Basically shy and retiring. An active inventor, he held a host of patents. Disintegration at life’s end indicates a deep sense of impurity. Frustrated lifetime of trying to find truth and beauty in an ugly dishonest world, only to be relegated to its low-budget arena, and never being able to transcend it for his efforts.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS HIGHLY SKILLED CRAFTSMAN:
Storyline: The plaudit-winning player enjoys projecting being who he is not, while showing a sure hand in all aspects of theatricality, from characterization to directing to live performance in an ongoing celebration of the illuminating power of a well-honed dramatic imagination, despite highly serious character flaws.

vKevin Spacey (Kevin Fowler) (1959) - American actor/director. Outer: Of Swedish, English and some Welsh ancestry. Father was a writer of technical manuals, who was frequently unemployed, mother was a secretary, which created an itinerant, financially insecure family, that moved almost yearly his first 14 annums. Youngest of 3, with a great deal of anger towards his sire fro the family’s sense of being continually uprooted. Unruly and shy with no self-esteem as a youngster, he set fire to a shed containing his sister’s toys, then was kicked out of military school for fighting, although his parents had exposed him to the arts to make him more sensitive. Touched by a performance he saw of Katherine Hepburn’s, he waited at the stage door for her with flowers, and their brief chat sent him on his life’s path. Took acting classes in high school and found he could channel his emotions through emoting. 5’11”, with dark brown hair and light brown eyes. Co-valedictorian of his high school class. Educated at both L.A. Valley Community College and the Julliard School of Drama, quitting the latter after 2 years. Became fascinated with the his/story of acting, and felt he would be best served on the stage. Worked as a standup comedian, as well as with the Seattle Repertory Company and moved from there to repertory theater and Broadway, where he appeared as Jamie Tyrone in Eugene O’Neill’s “Long Days’ Journey into Night,” a role he also reprised in London. Although resistant to TV, he had his breakthrough role as a villain on TV’s “Wiseguy”’ in 1987, playing an incestuous drug-addict named Profitt for 2 seasons, after first turning down the part. Made his film debut in 1986 in Heartburn. Did more TV work, then won a Tony award for “Lost in Yonkers,” in 1991. Built up a reputation as a character actor, before his career coalesced in the mid-1990s with several interesting turns, most notably as a master criminal in The Usual Suspects, for which a won a Best Supporting Actor Oscar in 1996. Followed that role with a turn as a same-sex murder suspect in Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, and made an impressive directorial debut with Albino Alligator in 1997. Two years later, he appeared on Broadway as Hickey in Eugene O’Neill’s “The Iceman Cometh,” which he also played in London. Formed his own production company, Trigger St. Productions, and won an Academy Reward for Best Actor in 2000 for his role as a drop-out breadwinner in American Beauty, although his next set of films floundered. In 2003, he was appointed artistic director of London’s prestigious Old Vic Theatre Company, with a long-term commitment to the enterprise. The following year, after moving to London, he was beaten and robbed late at night in a park known as a gay cruising area, to fuel oft-repeated rumors of his own sexual orientation. In 2004, he also realized a longtime dream in creating a biopic of his earlier idol, Bobby Darin, in which he gave an uncanny imitation of the singer, while skipping the darker elements of his life. Although his first season with the Old Vic was rife with criticism for his strange choice of plays, he ultimately triumphed as Richard II in 2005, while infusing the much-loved theatrical institution with a new sense of dramatic urgency, and a far broader audience appeal, thanks to his acting, directing and fundraising, despite further carping at his choice of vehicles for it. A confirmed transatlantean, he has found both a home and contentment in London, while still continuing his film career as a secondary means of self-expression. Returned to the U.S. in 2013 to star in “House of Cards,” playing the primary protagonist in the former BBC adaptation, a southerner who becomes president, in the popular series multi-season series, and won a Golden Globe for it in 2015. The following year, he was appointed chairman of Relativity Media’s film-making division, as part of the studio’s attempt to reorganize and escape Chapter 11 bankruptcy, only to later pull out of the position. Played host to the 2017 Tonys, receiving mixed reviews for his impressions, and stabs at entertaining bits. Later that year he finally came out as a homophile, after actor Anthony Rapp accused him of sexual misconduct when he was 14, as the media played up the former and minimalized the latter. More sexual harassment allegations would follow, leading to his being dumped by his talent agency and publicist, and threatening the continuation of his entire career. Has a net worth of $100 million. Inner: Great love for the theater, which he considers his mainstay. Enjoys playing characters who seem one way and turn out another, perhaps in reflection of himself, in his own coy demurring about questions surrounding his sexuality. Multi-hatted lifetime of experiencing the various venues of self-expression, from comedy to drama to direction, in an ongoing pursuit of pure craft, after earlier focusing on pure production, while keeping his private life deliberately private. vJames Cruze (James Vera Cruz Bosen) (1884-1942) - American actor/director. Outer: From a family of Mormon descent. Part Ute, sister Mae Cruze became an actress. Had little formal schooling, while showing an early desire to take to the stage. Worked as a fisherman in the Bering Sea in order to finance his way through drama school. Became an actor at the age of 16, appearing in medicine shows, as a snake oil salesman. Also did road shows and stock as his apprenticeship. In his early 20s, he joined the Belasco company, and appeared frequently on Broadway. Began his film career at the outset of the industry in 1911, commencing with A Boy of the Revolution, and starred in numerous movies, as well as several serials. Married actress Marguerite Snow in 1913, divorced 11 years later. In 1916, he joined the Lasky company and 2 years later made his directorial debut with Two Many Millions. Ended his acting career the following year, and went on to become both a producer and director, easily making the transition to sound a decade later. Proved to be an extremely prolific director, working in all of the genres, from slapstick to suspense to large scale epics. Although many of his efforts were facile, since he preferred productivity and quantity, he was also capable of high quality work, as evidenced in the meticulously constructed epic, The Covered Wagon in 1923, which proved extremely influential in the evolution of the Hollywood western. Married actress Betty Compson in 1924, divorced 6 years later. His third marriage lasted. At the suggestion of Will Hays, the appointed moral’s czar of the industry who was brought in to squelch the scandalous activities of the film community in the early 1920s, he made the charming Hollywood, a reverse Cinderella story where the beautiful heroine does not become a star. Noted for both his craftsmanship and his rapid, on-budget ability to deliver his productions, his career was eventually curtailed by ill health. Died of a heart ailment. Inner: Facile, focused and extremely productive. Anti-authoritarian, had several run-ins with the law. Cruise-control lifetime of being imbued with the ethic of hard work through his upbringing, far from the bright lights of Hollywood, as well as the drive and motivation to become someone completely different from his origins.

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