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SHOW BUSINESS - MARTIAL ARTISTS- GENERALS, CHIEFS & PUGILISTS

 

PATHWAY OF THE MAGICIAN AS MASTER ILLUSIONIST:
Storyline: The enchanting escape artist weaves continual spells around his magical abilities, while constantly playing tricks on both himself and his captivated audience around his artistry and his death-defying acts and obsessions.

Tony Curtis (Bernhard Schwartz) (1925-2010) - American actor and artist. Outer: Of Hungarian descent. Father was an immigrant Jewish tailor, and his mother was a shopkeeper, who suffered from schizophrenia and often beat her sons. Oldest of three brothers, with the youngest suffering from his mother’s debility. Had an impoverished upbringing in Manhattan until he was 12, when his family moved to a tough neighborhood in the Bronx. Spent some time in a state institution as well, because his parents could not support all three sons. Singled out for being a pretty boy and a Jew, his natural athleticism made him a good, fast streetfighter, who always harbored fantasies about the movies. Lost his middle brother in 1938, when he was hit by a truck. His first acting role was in a neighborhood settlement house, where he played a little girl in King Arthur’s court. Joined the Navy during WW II and was wounded on Guam, while also being present at the Japanese surrender at Tokyo Bay. On his discharge, he attended CCNY and took acting classes at NY’s Dramatic Workshop, before joining a stock company that toured the Catskill Mountain’s Borscht Circuit. Appeared off-Broadway, and then signed a movie contract, where he was renamed, although never quite relieved of his NY accent, early on uttering the immortal, “Yonduh stands duh castle of my fodder.” Began with juvenile roles, but soon became a recognized star, more for his looks initially, than his acting skills. 5’9”, with pale blue eyes, and a curious full-lipped feminine beauty about him. Married actress Janet Leigh in his mid-20s, and the duo became a popular Hollywood couple, until their breakup 11 years later after a well-publicized affair with 17 year old actress Christine Kaufmann. Two children from the union, including daughter Jamie Lee Curtis, who later became a movie star, while claiming he was never much of a father, leading to permanent estrangement between the two. Continually adulterous, and seductive, he served as a basis for Billy Wilder’s The Apartment. In 1953, he played the title role of Houdini, in a thoroughly romanticized version of his earlier life. Began stretching his skills in the late 1950s with a series of well-received roles, most notably as an escaped convict in The Defiant Ones, which got him a best actor nomination. Formed a production company, Curtleigh Productions, with actor Kirk Douglas, and worked steadily throughout the 1960s in a variety of parts, including the self-defining The Great Impostor. His second union was with Christine Kaufmann from 1963-1967, 2 daughters from the union, while continuing his compulsively seductive ways. Married a third time in 1968 to 23 year old model Leslie Allen, divorced in 1984, 2 sons from the union with the oldest dying of a heroin overdose in 1994. Failed twice to establish himself in a pair of TV series during the 1970s, and ultimately relegated himself to talk show appearances on the small screen. Married a fourth time in 1984 to actress Andrea Savio, which also ended in divorced in 1992. Extended his creative mode of expression to a novel, and painting, becoming skilled in the latter discipline. Became addicted to drugs in the mid-70s, ultimately cleaning out at the Betty Ford clinic a decade later. Married a 5th time in 1993 to attorney Lisa Deutsch for a year, while continually seeking the company of youthful, beautiful women in his ongoing need to remain forever young. His 6th and final marriage in 1998 was to an amazon equestrienne, Jill Vandenburg. His film career eventually petered into supporting roles, although he continually maintained a public profile through talk show appearances and his ongoing career as an artist of collages and assemblages. Co-authored a caustic, crude autobiography in 1993, and made his stage debut at 77 in “Some Like It Hot,” a musical reprise of his earlier hit movie. At the end of 2006, he went into a coma for several days, after suffering from pneumonia, and wound up wheelchair bound afterwards. Penned a second co-written autobiography, “American Prince: A Memoir” in 2008, admitting to an earlier affair with Marilyn Monroe at the beginning of both their careers. Had his last screen appearance the same year, in a low-budget indie, playing a character named Mr. Schwartz. Died at home of cardiac arrest. Inner: Charming, earthy, captivating, self-worshipping and highly expressive. More and more youth obsessed the older he got. Real name of Schwartz (black), a reversal of his previous go-round’s name of Weiss (White), indicating a similar exploration of the opposite side of his sexual circle, from virgin to compulsive philanderer. Great impostor lifetime of trying to discover his true moorings through a never-ending pursuit of youth and beauty, while employing all his escape artist guile in trying to elude old age and death. Harry Houdini (Ehrich Weiss) (1874-1926) - Hungarian/American magician. Outer: His formidable mother, Cecilia Steiner, was probably the love of his life, and much psychological analysis has been made of his desire to return to her womb via his escapades with eluding death. Father was a self-styled Hungarian rabbi. Youngest of 5 sons. Another brother also became a magician. The family moved to Wisconsin to escape the rabid anti-Semitism of the time, and they lived a hand-to-mouth existence there. Legend had it, he opened his first lock, when he wanted a piece of pie from the kitchen closet. At 9, he joined a traveling circus as a contortionist and trapeze performer, before adding escapes to his act. His progenitor died when he was 12, and made him promise on his deathbed that he would always take care of his mother. Toured the country for 15 years in all sorts of venues, before settling in NYC. Built his reputation in medicine shows and vaudeville, later working to best effect as a solo act. 5’2”, strong, stocky and bowlegged with a large head and small feet. Met his future wife, Wilhelmina Rahner (Jamie Lee Curtis), when he was 20 and she 18, at a children’s party he entertained at in Brooklyn, when she shyly said she liked him, and he immediately proposed marriage, which was probably never consummated, after a whirlwind three week courtship. Both parents adamantly opposed the union because of religious differences, with her mother not speaking to him for years. The duo, however, were devoted to one another for the rest of his life and she initially served as his assistant, while he treated her as if she were an elevated being. Never was particularly good at sleight of hand tricks, and initially evolved an escape act from handcuffs, a theme he would continue to embellish with more and more elaborate props and challenges, so that after the turn of the century, after a six year tour of Europe, he had an international reputation, all centered around his death-defying skills at escape, thanks to his ability to hide keys on his body, and his extraordinary muscle control. Took his stage name from French magician Jean-Eugene Robert Houdin (Michael Gondry). An obsessive performer with boundless energy, he quickly captured the imagination of the world with his death-defying feats, performing all over the U.S. and Europe. As he perfected his techniques, he enlarged his challenges, suspending himself in straitjackets and having himself tossed in frozen rivers or locked in coffins and submerged in tanks of water. His mother died in his late 30s, and he became very interested in spiritualism to try to communicate with her. Appeared in several action movies in the early days of silent film, producing a couple of them himself. In his later career, he debunked mediums and mind readers as charlatans, although made a pact with his wife that the first to die would contact the other from the other side through mediumistic means. Wrote several books unmasking the tricksters of his trade, including his adopted namesake, and amassed a huge library devoted to works on the theater, and magic and the black arts. Had a premonition of his own death, and wept bitterly over it. Shortly afterward, he was punched twice in the stomach without warning by a student, after claiming at a class debunking spiritualistic tricks, that he could withstand any blow to that area. Subsequently suffered a ruptured appendix, although he continued performing for several days, before succumbing to peritonitis in his early 50s, following two operations. Buried in the same bronze casket that he had used on his final tour, with his head cradled on a bag of letters from his mother. His bereft wife tried to contact his spirit afterwards for years, but finally gave up on the tenth anniversary of his death. Inner: Perfectionist, self-obsessed, stickler for detail, great will. Submerged himself daily in a sealed casket for a half hour. Unusual physical strength, dextrous picker of locks, often secreting the keys on his person. Continually reinventing himself, ultimately losing sight of his own limited realities. Probably a virgin. Disliked being called Harry or even Mr. Houdini, preferring only his last name. Totally obsessed with death, and the idea of his own immortality, constantly testing his limits. Capable of bitter feuds and violent outbursts of temper. Straitjacketed lifetime of a master illusionist totally getting lost in his own illusions about himself and the very nature of life. Giovanni Battista Belzoni (1778-1823) - Italian strongman, artist and archaeologist. Outer: One of four sons of a Roman barber. Educated for monastic orders in Rome in order to escape military conscription, but was forced to flee the advancing French armies and wound up in Holland in 1800, selling religious talismans, before coming to England in 1803. Handsome, charming and huge, 6’7”, with unusual strength. At the same time, he married Sarah Bane (Jamie Lee Curtis), and, after a period of dire poverty as a street performer, he went to work for Philip Astley’s (Clint Eastwood) Circus as a strongman, playing Hercules, Apollo and Samson, carrying as many as a dozen small figures on a steel frame strapped to his waist. Did clever stunts with water, and ultimately offered the Sultan of Egypt an idea for a hydraulic pump for use in irrigation. Went to Egypt in 1815 with his wife and worked as a dancer in Cairo, then, via his friendship with the British consul-general there, began transporting antiquities for the British Museum, plundering numerous tombs and temples, after initially being wedged into one of the internal passages of the Great Pyramid. As an amateur archaeologist, he discovered the grave of Seti I (Alfred Krupp) and was the first European in the pyramid of Chephren in Giza. Far more of a plunderer than a true archaeologist, with little regard for anything he deemed non-exploitable, he often used battering rams to break through walls, while squashing mummies by sitting on them, and crunching miscellaneous bones underfoot in his colossal carelessness. His digs would also be coupled with misadventures galore, creating a comic opera patina to much of what he did. Returned to Europe in 1819, and the following year, he published a book on his escapes and escapades, illustrated by himself, in which he gave his wife no credit. In 1823, he began to search for the source of the Nile, but died miserably of dysentery in the African bush 2 years later. Afterwards his widow exhibited his drawings and models of the royal tombs of Thebes, until they were confiscated, leaving her destitute. Inner: Gentle giant, trustworthy and honorable, but both suspicious and jealous of others. Avaricious, duplicitous, and incredibly strong, with an obsessive interest in the Egyptian past. Go-for-it lifetime of exploring some of the themes he would later exploit in his Houdini go-round, including a fascination with water, burials and narrow escapes as well as unusual physical strength and coordination, before finally succumbing to an insatiable thirst for grander and grander adventure. Sigismundo Malatesta (1417-1486) - Italian prince. Outer: Family had been lords of Rimini since the 13th century, with a long violent his/story. Father was Pandolfo Malatesta III, a condottiere of considerable military repute. Left orphaned at 10, he followed the family tradition of precocious warriors, excelling in his first battle at 13 against papal troops. At 17, he took Bologna, and spent most of his martial life with sword in hand, fighting both for and against the Church as a captain-general. Noted for his bestial fighting ability, and an idealization of the warrior-prince of the times. Tall, strong, with almond-shaped eyes and a domineering personality, which made him a natural leader. Excellent horseman who combined every virtue and vice possible. Tortured and poisoned his first mate, the daughter of Niccolo III (Kenneth Tynan) and Parisina (Jean Rhys) from the powerful d’Este family. His 2nd wife, was the daughter of the dangerous Francesco Sforza (Jean Paul Getty), and he married her for political and military reasons, but after cheating his father-in-law out of a large sum of money, his wife soon died from mysterious circumstances, possibly strangled by him. Only his 3rd wife, Isotta degli Atti, who had been his longtime mistress, earned his genuine love and affection. Despite his bestial character, he was also the possessor of considerable artistic sensitivity. Corresponded with the learned men of his age, wrote poetry, and patronized literature. He was declared a heretic by the pope in 1461, who called him the ‘prince of wickedness,’ sentencing him to be burned at the stake for robbery, adultery, incest, sodomy, rape and murder, among other heinous acts. An effigy of him was burned in Rome and a 2 year war ensued, which, in effect, ended his career. Lost most of his money and all of his power and only managed to save his home base by signing a papal treaty. Succeeded by his brother, a bastard son. Inner: Passionate, cruel, lustful, a sheer fighting machine, with tremendous ambition and thirst for power, as well as a dualistic sensitivity and appreciation of the beautiful. Sword-in-one-hand, pen-in-the-other lifetime of passionately pursuing all that he did, both virtue and vice alike, before finally being undone by his considerable excesses.

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PATHWAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTIST AS SELF-STYLED STORYTELLER:
Storyline: The adipose-challenged adept exercises his artistic spirit from a warrior sensibility, trying to entwine the two in a series of well-received public careers that has ultimately made him a worldwide icon of rocky, violent inarticulateness, despite his largely unseen underlying keen sense of aesthetics.

Sylvester Stallone (Sylvester Gardenzio Stallone) (1946) - American actor and screenwriter. Outer: Of Italian descent on his paternal side, with some Breton and German ancestry on his maternal side: Born the same day as Pres. George W. Bush. Mother Jacqueline was a chorine, later turned astrologer and promoter of women’s wrestling. Father was a hair stylist. Younger brother Frank also an actor. His forceps-assisted birth damaged a facial nerve, paralyzing the left side of his face, causing an eyelid to droop, and he was subsequently taunted by other children for a speech impediment. From 2 to 5, he boarded with a woman in Queens, seeing his parents on weekends. His sire was critical and unsupportive, forcing him to fantasize about being a hero to compensate for his loneliness. Moved with his family to Maryland, where his progenitor had a successful string of hair salons. His parents divorced when he was 15, while his mother remarried a pizza manufacturer, and he lived with them in Philadelphia. Known as ‘Sly’ to friends. Expelled from over a dozen schools. 5’9”, with dark brown hair and eyes and a body-builder’s obsession with excessive muscularity. A weight-lifter and good athlete, which got him a scholarship to American College in Switzerland. Taught at a girl’s school in Switzerland, avoiding the Vietnam draft. Returned to the U.S., and studied theater briefly at the Univ. of Miami, where he was roundly discouraged from pursuing an acting career. Spent 7 years writing, doing odd jobs and acting, appearing in a porno film as the Italian Stallion, while landing small roles. Married at 28 to a fellow usher, Sasha Czack, 2 sons from the union, Sage, a sometime writer/actor and Seargeoh, who was autistic, and later recovered and appeared in one of his films. Struck imaginative gold in 1976 with Rocky, the laconic tale of a club fighter, which he wrote in 3 days, with $106 in the bank, and starred in, transforming himself into a public icon through its success, and winning an Academy Reward for Best Picture. Continued his career with further monosyllabic Rockys, as well as a Viet vet death-machine named Rambo, while complaining he wasn’t allowed to grow because of the public’s identification of him with the 2 roles. Became an international action star, pumping his frame to heroic proportions, and offering cartoonish, violent fare to undiscriminating world-wide audiences. Unable, however, to cash in on his comedic nature or non-formulaic dramas. Divorced in 1985, he married Amazon actress Brigitte Nielsen, divorced again 2 years later, and conceived a daughter with heart problems with a model/girlfriend, Jennifer Flavin, whom he later married in his early 50s. Three more daughters followed, along with a growing sense of domesticity to counterbalance his failure to excite box office response in much of his later career, including Rocky V. All his children would have ‘S’ names. Also an amateur surrealist painter, as well as a continuous litigant, bringing everyone from his father-in-law to producers, nannies, car dealers and the like to court for perceived financial slights. In 2005, he entered the realm of publishing with a fitness magazine, “Sly,” as well as reality TV, with “The Contender,” dealing with young boxers. In an attempt for one last cinematic hurrah, launched Rambo IV and Rocky Balboa, with the latter proving a surprisingly well-rendered hit. In 2007, he was nabbed in Australia, along with his entourage, for bringing banned body-building substances into the country, then was allegedly seen tossing things out his hotel room window prior to a police inspection, although was subsequently allowed to leave the country, and was ultimately modestly fined for the transgression. Later promoted human growth hormone as a means of staying in shape for his latest addled Rambo gore fest, then suffered a hairline fracture in his neck filming a fight scene with wrestler Stone Cold Steve Austen in The Expendables, showing himself to be expendable as well in his need to continue his punishing roles into his 60s. Absolutely devasted by the loss of his oldest son Sage to an accidental drug overdose on prescription pills in 2012, days before he was supposed to get married, although it was later officially called a heart attack.In 2014, he was awarded $5 million in a breach of contract suit with his partners over royalties. Won a Golden Globe in 2016 for best supporting actor for his portrayal of an aging Rocky Balboa as a mentor in Creed. Demurred on the possibility of being named chairman of the National Endowment of the Arts by the Trump administration, and instead said he would be more useful helping veterans in some capacity. Has a net worth of $400 million. Inner: Social, gracious, good-humored, but also filled with himself as a larger-than-life figure. Hero complex, great need to be publicly loved. Avid art collector with far more depth of personality than evinced by his screen personae. Sly muscular lifetime of translating his peculiar masculinity into the tastes of his times, while continuing to try to find a balance between his martial and esthetic sensibilities. William Gillette (1853-1937) - American actor and playwright. Outer: Father was a reformer and U.S. Senator, mother was the descendant of the founder of Hartford, his hometown. Youngest of 5, with three older brothers, As a child, he performed plays in a toy theater, and was also an orator in high school. Attended a host of schools, although never completed any of their programs. Despite his parents’ misgivings, he dropped out of his last college, and, in his early 20s, began an acting career in New Orleans, later appearing in NYC in a part that his neighbor Mark Twain (Kurt Vonnegut), had written for him. Tall and slender, blue-eyed with chiseled features. Married Helen Nichols in his late 20s, who died from TB 6 years later, no children from the union. Completely griefstruck afterwards, to the extent of not appearing on stage for the next six years, and never showed an appetite for marriage again. After numerous roles, he was hired as a playwright by the Frohman Brothers, and brought to New York in 1881, where he starred in his own vehicle, "The Professor." Wrote, co-wrote, and adapted other works, often starring in them, but always played himself, in a naturalistic fashion, no matter the material. His greatest success was as detective Sherlock Holmes, with whom he subsequently became identified. Credited with the deerstalker hat, calabash pipe and Inverness cape, for which the character would be forever known afterwards, as well as the phrase, “Elementary, my dear Watson.” Wrote 20 plays, acting in 9 of them, which were written specifically to exploit his limited talents. Retired briefly in 1919 to a 24 room castle he had built for himself, which had a 3 mile miniature railroad that he used to entertain guests. Also lived on his houseboat, with a tendency towards reclusiveness. Suffered from TB and died of a pulmonary hemorrhage. Inner: Aloof, but not unfriendly. Limited actor, with a narrow range, but able to exploit it for maximum commercial effect. Non-drinker, picky eater, eccentric and very vain. Understated, laconic, soft-spoken. Never could let himself go on stage. Elementary lifetime of switching entirely to the stage, and creating a strong identification with a mentally muscular character, in order to continue opening up his innate creativity, despite a resistance from a repressed personality, that forced him to go inward, rather than his usual outward mode. John Burgoyne (1722-1792) - English general and playwright. Known as ‘Gentleman Johnny.’ Outer: Father was a captain and man of fashion. Attended Westminster School, then became a cornet in the exclusive 1st Dragoons at 18, purchasing a lieutenancy the following year. Eloped with the sister of an aristocratic friend at 21, Lady Charlotte Stanley, but her father, the 11th Earl of Derby, refused to give him her dowry. Bought a captaincy, but was soon overwhelmed by debt and was forced to sell his commission. He then settled in exile in France for 7 years, where he learned the language and familiarized himself with French literature, before reconciling with his powerful father-in-law. Learned about continental armies, and introduced light horse cavalry to England, while proving to be a popular officer, using honor rather than severe discipline to hone his troops into effective fighting units. Fought successfully, was elected an M.P., rose to brigadier general and went to battle in Portugal, beating a larger contingent. Again became an M.P., proving himself an adroit statesman, while enjoying membership in all the fashionable clubs, and hanging out with the culterati of his times. Also won favor at court, holding several military posts. Began writing for the stage, although his works were largely nondescript. Sent to America in 1774 to fight against the revolutionaries, he left and returned there 3 years later, although his small army and lack of munitions hampered him greatly and he was forced to surrender his 9000 men at Saratoga in 1777, despite displaying an extreme confidence in his limited abilities. The action would be a turning point of the Revolution, for it convinced France to enter the war on behalf of the colonists. Back in England, his actions were questioned and he became a member of the opposition party. He was given more offices until his supporters fell from power, then he attacked his enemies with the pen in lieu of his usual sword. Had 4 out-of-wedlock children with a popular singer during his 60s. Continued writing for the stage, where he had some success, despite his limitations in a life that ultimately drew far more plaudits than boos, allowing him to die in honorable retirement. Inner: Highly social, effective soldier and well-liked all-around. Cool, debonair and courageous. Had a minimal writing talent, and was a success largely through the dint of his own personality. Crossover lifetime of making the leap from his martial sensibilities to the more rarified realm of the arts, allowing him to begin the very public process of integrating his sense of the hero and the artist, an ongoing theme of his.

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PATHWAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTIST AS ILL-LOVED HERO TURNED ICON:
Storyline: The stone-faced soldier moves into the realm of make-believe to open up his battlefield-hardened heart to the far more difficult task of winning the love of those around him, after many a go-round of sacrificing the personal for the impersonal of medals and martial goals.

Charles Bronson (Casimir Buchinsky) (1920-2003) - American actor. Outer: Father was a Lithuanian coal miner, mother was also of Slavic descent. 5th son and 9th of 15 children, and the only one to finish high school, although like his brothers, he entered the mines at the age of 16, doing the night shift while going to school during the day. His family slept in shifts in a cold water shack, with trains from the pit head going day and night. Hardly ever saw his father, who didn’t want to be bothered with his family after laboring all day, and died when he was 10. His brother also passed on when he was in his teens. Always the family favorite, often got into fights. Went into the army during WW II, which was a step up for him economically, and served as a tail-gunner on a B-29 bomber, then studied art in Philadelphia, before joining an acting company as a set designer, and then a bit player. 5’10”, well-muscled and craggy-faced. Enrolled at the Pasadena Playhouse in 1949, and the same year he married a fellow player, Harriet Tendler, several children from the union, including one son who died of a drug overdose. His wife eventually wrote a book about their relationship. Quickly typecast as a brawny support in films and TV productions, he made his debut in the former in 1951 in You’re in the Navy Now. Changed his name in 1954, after earlier shortening it to Buchinski. Played villains, ethnics and punks during the 1950s, before rising to the level of B-movie lead towards the end of the decade, thanks to his unique looks and solid, stoic physicality. Remained largely a support player until 1968, when he moved to Europe and quickly became an overnight international action star. Divorced and married English actress Jill Ireland Lily-Rose Depp), who would later die of cancer in 1990, and together the duo would do 15 films, very close relationship. 7 children all told from his unions. Big favorite in the European capitals, as an exemplar of physical toughness and taut-faced macho resolve, earning the sobriquet of ‘le sacre monstre’ in France and ‘il Brutto’ in Italy. In 1971, he won a Golden Globe award as the world’s most popular actor. Returned to Hollywood the following year, but couldn’t translate his overseas success, thanks to a bad instinct for scripts, turning down several hits, until he starred in a vigilante series called Death Wish, beginning in 1974. Continued in standard Hollywood action fare, afterward, and then was far less of a screen presence following his wife’s death in 1990. No longer interested in portraying violent characters, he began playing softer parts in the 1990s, as well as doing TV movies. Married again in 1998 and retired from the screen to his Vermont farm. Reportedly suffered from Alzheimer’s at life’s end and died of pneumonia. Inner: Stoic and reserved, opening up only to close friends. Never took himself seriously as a star, and never revealed his true softer self on screen or in interviews. Preferred exhibiting the strengths rather than weaknesses of his characters, while noting he came from a harder background than most of the people he played. Stone-faced lifetime of making the transition to the silver screen from the battlefield, and proving himself a far more beloved hero on the personal level, than his previous incarnations could ever bring to him. Horatio Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener of Khartoum (Horatio Herbert Kitchener) (1850-1916) - British field marshal and administrator. Outer: Father was a retired, eccentric lieutenant colonel and bully and martinet who used newspapers instead of blankets, mother was his first wife and the daughter of a vicar. 3rd child and second son. His family moved to Switzerland when he was one because of his mother’s tuberculosis. Learned French in a local school, then attended the Royal Military Academy, where he was commissioned in the Royal Engineers in his early 20s. 6’2” and broad-shouldered, and powerfully built with a florid complexion. Had a great love of France, and a strong connection to the East. Volunteered for the French army during the Franco-Prussian War, then did survey and intelligence work in the Middle East, gaining knowledge of Arabic culture. His fiancee, Hermoine Baker (Lily-Rose Depp), died of typhus in 1881, and he wound up never marrying. Served in Zanzibar, then returned to the Sudan in 1886 as governor general of the Red Sea coast. Wounded in the face battling the Mahdist (Osama Bin Laden) forces, then was appointed commander-in-chief of the Egyptian army, though still only a colonel in the British army. His great organizational skills helped him make the Egyptian army an effective fighting force, and he was able to defeat the Mahdists, while being called, “more like a machine than a man,” for his precision. Appointed governor-general of the Sudan for a year, he then fought in the Boer War, where his battles with the guerrilla forces there refashioned him as a hero in England. Returned home and was made a viscount, although declined to serve in the War Office. Reorganized the army in India, and was made field marshal in 1909. A High Church Party member of the Church of England, with strong Christian sensibilities. Appointed viceroy of Egypt and the Sudan, before he reluctantly accepted being named Secretary of War, when WW I began, the first active soldier to be a part of the inner governing circle since George Monck (George C. Marshall) in the 17th century. Predicted a long war, the only member of the cabinet to correctly see it would take years to thoroughly defeat Germany, although was stripped of his authority, but remained in his position out of loyalty. Thanks to his heroic status, he was famously emblazoned on a recruiting poster, with the sentiment, “Your country needs you.” Went down when his ship, the armored cruiser HMS Hampshire, struck a German mine while on a secret mission to Russia to coordinate fighting efforts. His body was never found and his death brought about great public mourning. Inner: Ambitious, ruthless, arrogant, austere, cold and distant, the very apotheosis of a man’s man, totally out-of-touch with his female side. Disciplined, hard-working and highly effective administrator and organizer. Inspired more than 3,000,000 men to join the army. Drove himself hard and expected others to follow suit. Heroic lifetime of displaying his martial abilities, although unable to express his hidden humanity, which necessitated a change in careers the next time around, to allow him to touch lightly on the feminine in order to bring his heavy masculinity into greater balance. M. Barclay de Tollay (Mikhail Bogdanovich, Prince Barclay de Tollay) (1761-1818) - Russian field marshal. Of Scots descent, he joined the Russian army at 15, and served briefly a decade later against the Turks, after which he was made adjutant to a prince. Continued to prove his battlefield mettle against the Swedes and Poles, rising to the rank of general by 1799. Distinguished himself in the field, over and over, and was badly wounded at Eylau in 1807, although he was given the rank of lieutenant general by the czar, Alexander I (Mikhail Gorbachev) for his bravery and leadership. Fought against the Swedes and was made minister of war in 1810, holding that post for 2 years, during which time he tried to remodel the army along French lines. When the Emperor Napoleon invaded Russia in 1812, he was given command of the First Army of the West, and adopted a strategy of evasion and retreat, drawing the French ever deeper into Russia, while stretching out their supply lines. Defeated at Smolensk and was relieved of his post, but he fought well subsequently at Borodino, then resigned immediately afterwards. Called back to duty the following year, 1813, against the Prussians, he was elevated to the rank of count for defeating them at Leipzig. Led the Russian forces on their invasion of France in 1814, and was upgraded to field marshal after occupying Paris. Appointed commander of chief of the Russian Army during Napoleon’s last gasp, and though he saw no direct action, he was made a prince at the end of the campaign, and died 3 years later. Inner: Excellent administrator, brave in battle and a good tactician, with a strong sense of order, discipline and physical endurance and courage. Cold and distant, he was not liked by his men. Sword-in-hand lifetime of showing his heart upon the field, if not in his relationships, which would be ultimately redressed after one more go-round of rising to the level of national hero to all but his own cohorts and men.

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PATHWAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTIST AS FLAWED HANDSOME HE-MAN:
Storyline: The adroit Adonis embraces a Neanderthal masculinity, while proving himself a charming madman and domestic god off-screen as well as a capable character on it, at least for a while, with an abundance of talent to complement his Apollonian looks, along with a deep religiosity, and an equal self-destructive streak to offset both.

xMel Gibson (Mel Colmcille Gerard Gibson) (1951) - American/Australian actor and filmmaker. Outer: Father was an Irish-Catholic brakeman for the NY Central Railroad, who once considered becoming a priest. A highly opinionated, well-read man, he ultimately wrote several books on his ultra-conservative religious views, which operated outside the traditional Roman Catholic Church. Mother was his soft-hearted opposite and had been an Australian opera singer. Son was 6th of 11 children, the last being adopted, and grew up in a household, whose deep-felt values included a disdain for money and a great faith in their sense of God. His father injured his back from slipping on some oil and falling from a train, then won $21,000 on the TV game show “Jeopardy,” while waiting for his lawsuit to be settled. He subsequently decided to take his family to Australia because of his older son’s draft vulnerability for the Vietnam War, as well as economic reasons. Raised there from the age of 12, working in the food industry while attending an all-boy’s Catholic high school, where he played class clown. 5’10 1/2”, with dark brown hair and blue eyes as well as well-built, with movie star looks After graduating, he auditioned for Sydney’s National Institute of Dramatic Arts, when his sister filled out an application for him. Despite his lack of ambition, he wound up acting in dozens of plays, including Shakespeare. A barroom brawler and drinker in his spare time, he got his breakthrough role as Mad Max in a series of nihilistic futuristic road warrior fantasies, after being beaten up a week beforehand. A wild man in the macho Australian tradition of freewheeling fisticuffs and uninhibited imbibing during his early career, he proved himself an actor of some depth in several more Australian productions, winning awards and establishing himself as an international romantic and action star. In 1980, he married Robyn Moore, a former nurse’s aide, 6 sons and a daughter from union, whose privacy he zealously protected. Did stagework in Australia, while augmenting his reputation as a comely male lead in a series of films, before doing Lethal Weapon, which added a new dimension to his Mad Max characterization, and demanded several follow-ups. Also played Hamlet on film to good reviews, albeit small crowds. In 1993, he made his directorial debut with The Man Without A Face, playing against his own striking physicality, and also formed his own production company, Icon Productions, for which he has produced, directed and acted. Won the 1996 Oscar for both Best Picture and Director for his production of Braveheart, the life of ancient Scotland’s William Wallace (Vo Nguyen Giap). Although his films are thoroughly apolitical, his anti-feminist and anti-gay remarks have not made him popular with either of those 2 social groups. Maintains a sprawling Australian ranch, and lived with his family in Los Angeles, while doing his best to avoid the press, as well as any Hollywood pretense. Courted considerable controversy in 2005 with his The Passion of the Christ, about the prophet Jesus’ last 12 hours, done in the original Aramaic, in his own Gospel According to Timex, which equates egregious suffering and punishment (takes a licking but keeps on ticking) with spiritual salvation. Put up the $25 million for the film, and reaped a huge financial reward for his efforts, as it took in hundreds of millions of dollars worldwide, while feeding into people’s fantasies about sin, suffering and salvation. Also built a church in the Agoura Hills in keeping with his father’s beliefs, which do not recognize any popes after the 2nd Vatican Council of 1962-1965. Expressed boredom with being a movie star, and plans to retreat behind the camera for his production company, which launched 3 TV shows for the 2004 season, and produced the follow-up to his religious blockbuster, Apocalypto, another exercise in excess mayhem, which, nevertheless showed his continuing development as a visceral director of more than passing expertise. In 2006, he was arrested for drunk driving and put on a display of contumely and cursing, including an anti-Semitic rant, that put into question his true passions behind The Passion. Apologized profusely afterwards, and showed himself genuinely more than willing to try to make amends, while receiving probation for his contumely, and fierce support from the religious right, who felt his artistic efforts more than made up for personal failings. Bought a theater chain in Australia, and after 28 years of marriage, replete with a several year separation, his wife filed for divorce in 2009, ironically the day before Good Friday, in what could be one of largest settlements on record, thanks to his $900 million + fortune. Subsequently had his 8th child, a daughter, with Oksana Grigorieva, his much younger Russian girlfriend, only to leave her months later, finding her far too clingy for his tastes. She later released several obscene racially-tinged tirades he unleashed against her on tape, to further his troglodyte image, along with other intimations of violence, polluting any vestige he had of his rapidly diminishing humanity in the public’s eye. Underwent therapy as a result, while his apologists from before showed themselves to be conspicuously silent. Also dropped from a cameo role on Hangover-2 after the cast complained. Agreed to a plea deal in 2011 to avoid jail time over assault charges against Oksana. Subsequently grew a bushy Assyrian-style beard in 2014, in an image change, while bulking up. Became involved with Rosalind Rose, some three and a half decades his junior at the same time. Got rave reviews for his 2016 offering Hacksaw Ridge limning the true story of a conscientious objector, Desmond Doss, who saved 75 men in the Japanese prefecture of Okinawa in World War II without firing a gun. At the same time, repeated his earlier Judeo-phobic canards in his inability to move beyond his obsessive sense of Hollywood victimhood. At the same time, repeated his earlier Judeophobic canards in his inability to move beyond his obsessive sense of Hollywood victimhood. Nevertheless, has quietly helped Shoa victims, sans publicity. Had his 9th child, a son, with Rosalind Rose in 2017. Has a net worth of over $400 million. Inner: Intensely private, uberconservative, with highly traditional values. Raucous sense of humor, quick wit, good mimic and impressionist, highly opinionated. Angry, irreverent, unpredictable, a lethal artistic weapon. Barroom brawler at heart, with a curious gift for self-crucifixion and resurrection. Addictive personality, with a particular difficulty with alcohol. Often features great suffering on the part of his heroes, as part of his take on redemptive behavior. Rogue lifetime of channeling his striking looks and considerable magnetism into a highly successful career, to offset his earlier pigeonholing as a grade ‘B’ man of action, while passionately projecting his passion play religiosity onto the world’s stage, as well as his far less than Christlike invective-spewing interior to counterbalance it.. xRichard Dix (Ernest Carlton Brimmer) (1894-1949) - American actor and director. Outer: Educated at Northwestern, and studied medicine at the Univ. of Minn., because his father wanted him to be a surgeon. 6’, 180 lbs, athletic and virile, with expressive eyes. Secretly went to drama school at night, and made his stage debut at school playing a football player. Began acting in more college plays and found the footlights a lot more alluring than forceps and scalpels. Worked at a bank, and began his career in stock in St. Paul, while supporting his mother and sister following his father’s death. After serving in WW I, he made his Broadway debut in 1919 in “The Hawk.” Entered films 2 years later, with Not Guilty, and proved to be an extremely popular brave-hearted archetype throughout the silent era, often playing calm, competent heroes whose actions did all the talking for him. Married Winifred Coe in 1931, 1 daughter, divorced 2 years later. His deep voice helped him easily make the transition to sound, in action/adventure films. Married Virginia Webster in 1934, twin sons, including Robert Dix, who became an actor, also adopted another daughter. Often clashed with studio management early in his career, and eventually switched studios in the talking era. Best remembered for his overripe performance in Cimarron in 1931, for which he received an Oscar nomination. Despite his initial successes, and the ability to play character roles, he ultimately was forced to do grade ‘B’ action films, including a series of 7 where he played ‘the Whistler,’ alternating between hero and villain in them. Died of a heart attack. Inner: Handsome ham lifetime of finding himself pigeonholed in second-rate action dramas after an earlier run of proving his popularity, spurring him to expand both his talents and his capacity to sustain a high-profile career in his next go-round in this series. xNicholas Oudinot, Duke of Reggio (1767-1847) - French general. Outer: Father was a successful brewer, farmer and distiller of brandy. The only child of 9 to make it to adulthood. Expected to follow his sire’s profession, but showed little interest in business. Despite receiving a good education and showing a sharp intelligence, academics largely bored him. Physical, boisterous and undisciplined as a youth, he ran away from home and enlisted in the army as a private at 17, and served for 3 years, before returning to the family business, at his parents’ insistence. Probably would have continued as such, had it not been for the French Revolution. Supple and thin, with a pale complexion and a haughty demeanor. In 1789, he married Eugenie d’Esting, 6 children from the happy union, which lasted until his wife’s death in 1810. At the outset of the Revolution, he was elected captain in a regiment of volunteers, and within two years had risen to lieutenant colonel. Made general of brigade in 1794, after distinguishing himself in battle, and served in the armies of the Rhine and the Moselle for the next 4 years. Continued to suffer battle wounds, and was captured in 1795, after being left for dead on the battlefield, but was soon repatriated. By 1799, he was promoted to general of division under Andre Massena, ultimately becoming his chief of staff, while incurring even more bodily harm. Continued to rise in rank under the emperor Napoleon, and in 1805, he was given command of an elite division called Oudinot’s Grenadiers. He was subsequently so seriously wounded that he needed a full year to recover, but returned to duty in 1807, for the Polish campaign. Despite a subsequent broken leg, he valorously led a division, and in 1808 was made count of the Empire. The following year, amidst more injuries, he was elevated to the rank of Marshal of France, and in 1810, was made Duke of Reggio. Felt impelled to marry again after his wife’s death, and did so in 1811, to the much younger Marie Charlotte Eugenie de Coucy, who was from an old provincial noble family, and very much his equal in iron will. 4 more children from the union. More wounding followed over the next several years, and in 1813, he suffered his worst defeat, compelling Napoleon to label him as headless. In 1814, he incurred his final wound, when his Grand Eagle of the Legion of Honor award saved him from certain death by a musketball in the chest. A virtual target for enemy fire, he ultimately suffered an incredible 34 battle wounds, many of them major. After the fall of Napoleon, he served on a peace commission, and the newly instated king made him commander of the Corps of Royal Grenadiers. Remained loyal to the crown on Napoleon’s return, and for his allegiance, he was created a minister of state, as well as given more posts. Became a devout Catholic, and established a school for orphans, towards the end of his life. His final campaign was in Spain, where he governed Madrid, and then was appointed governor of the Invalides in 1842, a post he held until his death. Inner: Brave and incredibly injury-prone, with the capacity to continually resurrect from almost inhuman punishment. Lived by a strict chivalric honor code, placing probity over all other virtues. Iron-willed and largely a throwback figure to simpler times. Demanding as a commander, with little tolerance for incompetence. Volcanic when younger, although more tempered as he grew older. Enjoyed the opera and the theater and was an amateur painter. Far more effective as a battlefield soldier than a commander. Braveheart lifetime of manfully showing his heart, if not quite his brains, on the battlefield, in his ongoing belief that taking punishment is the most redemptive course available to show one’s true spirituality. St. Longinus (fl. 1st cent. AZ) - Roman centurion and bishop. Outer: A figure of legend, who may or may not have existed. From the Roman province of Cappadocia. Became a centurion in the Roman army, and was present at the crucifixion of Jesus Christ. Taken by his suffering, he pierced his side with his lance to end it, and that spear would become a holy relic in the subsequent mythology surrounding the life and death of Christianity’s central prophet, as both blood and water poured from the wound. Known as ‘the Heilige Lance,’ or ‘Spear of Destiny,’ its possession would become an obsession with a host of his/storical figures, all the way up to the German Führer Adolf Hitler, since its holder held the mythic power of the world in his hands. After Hitler’s fall, it was returned to the Imperial Treasury in Vienna, Austria, where it currently sits. Reputedly converted afterwards to Christianity and ultimately became a minister of the new church, before rising to bishop of his home province. His act, although not his name, was recorded in the Gospel of St. John, while he was given his identity several hundred years later. Venerated as a saint in some circles, with his feast day Oct. 22. Inner: Legendary lifetime of not only being there on Christendom’s most sacred Friday, but acting as a muscular figure of compassion, conversion and conscience, to forever lance his name with Christianity’s most sacred phallic relic.

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PATHWAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTIST AS FLAMBOYANT DRAG QUEEN:
Storyline: The rococo crypto-chieftain finally claims his true self around his hidden interior, after earlier poisoning himself around his own confused sense of identity as a warrior with the body of a man, but the heart and soul of a woman.

RuPaul (RuPaul Andre Charles) (1960) - American entertainer. Outer: Of African/American descent. Third of four children from a rocky marriage that ended in divorce in 1967. Grew up on welfare in a female household with three sisters, two of whom were older twins. One sister accidentally broke his arm bathing him at six months old, at the same time he exited his previous existence in this series. Seen as a sissy while growing up, and realized early his attraction to his own gender, while finding inspiration in a host of female singers for who he ultimately wanted to be. Moved in with a sister and her husband in 1976 in Atlanta, and attended a school of the performing arts, although he eventually dropped out and got a G.E.D. Worked for his brother-in-law buying used luxury cars, then moved back to San Diego and attended San Diego Community College, but soon dropped out and returned to his previous employment. 6’4” and slender. Made his TV debut in 1982 on “The American Music Show,” as RuPaul and the U-hauls, and two years later, starred in an underground feature, Trilogy of Terror, in which he appeared in drag for the first time. Became a fixture on the Atlanta club scene with his band Wee Wee Pole, working as a bar dancer, then moved to NYC in 1987. Continued performing in Manhattan night clubs as a drag queen, ultimately garnering the title of “Queen of Manhattan 1990,” by club owners and djs. Spent the next 8 years in constant party mode, amid a flood of drugs, while losing his beloved mother, who had predicted at birth he would be a star, to cancer. Had a wicked verbal exchange with comedian Milton Berle on the 1993 VMA awards show, after being insulted backstage by the latter, in his refusal to kowtow to established and venerated celebrity. Released his own album, “Supermodel of the World,” in 1993, although it failed to initially make a dent, until one of its singles took off the following annum, as he became equally well-known for his dazzling Glamazon costumes as for his performing. At the same time, he made his overground film debut in Crooklyn, while all his exposure led to “The RuPaul Show,” on VH1, a talk & variety affair which lasted for three seasons. Became the supermodel face of M.A.C. Cosmetics, helping to raise over $20 million for its AIDS fund, before moving back to California to try to reclaim his youth there. A genuine celebrity in his own right, he continued releasing albums and making film and TV appearances after the turn of the century, and in 2009, returned to TV with a reality game show called “RuPaul’s Drag Race,” a competition to discover new performers in his gender-bending genre, which would have a multi-season run. In its 9th season in 2017, he stated the show had an extra purpose in giving cachet to the LGBT community in the wake of Donald Trump’s oppressive presidency. Penned his autobiography, “Lettin it all Hang Out,” in 1995 and has won numerous awards for his stances as a boundary-breaker. Has a net worth of $7 million. Inner: Exuberant, high energy, sharp-witted and addiction-prone, as well as a crypto-warrior, willing to fight in order to publicly and privately be his true self. Reclamation and self-realization lifetime of finally coming to grips with his full identity, a manly/womanly warrior more than willing to fight for his right to let it all hang out, whatever that it may be. qJeff Chandler (1918-1961) (Ira Grossel) - American actor. Outer: Of Jewish descent and Brooklyn-born. Father abandoned the family when he was young, and he was raised by his mother and grandmother, both of whom had a strong antipathy towards males. Found comfort dressing in his aunt’s underwear, and became a secret cross-dresser, which countered his strong 6’3” male appearance. Served in WW II, before beginning his acting career in radio dramas. Married actress Marjorie Hoshelle in 1946, two daughters from the union, which ended in divorce in 1954. Made his screen debut in his late 20s with Johnny O’Clock. Appeared in mostly action movies and Westerns, although his prematurely grey hair and handsome features made him a favorite of female fans as well. Played both romantic leads and exotic roles, reprising the Amerindian leader Cochise three times, as an unconscious reflection of his earlier incarnation as him. Had a longtime fascination with aquatic star and actress Esther Williams, although when he revealed himself in wig and gown to her, she couldn’t deal with his dualistic character, and their relationship, which was headed for marriage, summarily ended. Died prematurely of blood poisoning following surgery for a ruptured disc. Afterwards, his family got a big malpractice settlement. Inner: Masculine on the outside, but with a conflicted interior. Closeted lifetime of exploring his female side after many lives as a male warrior, only to ultimately wind up poisoned by the confusion of the process, necessitating a return in an unconventional role that he could publicly claim. qCochise (c1812-1874) - Chiricahua Apache warrior. Outer: Early life completely obscured. Name meant ‘hardwood,’ in Chiricahua Apache. Tall, broad-shouldered and deep chested, with a polite, gentle manner. Married Dostehseh, the daughter of the Mimbreno chief, Mangas Colorados, two sons from the union. Became a chief himself, while his people maintained peaceful relations with the white settlers who passed through their territories. In 1861, a raiding party drove off the cattle of a white rancher and abducted the child of a ranch hand. Ordered to appear before an inept army officer along with 5 other chiefs, he was seized and arrested along with them, despite having no connection to the raiding party. One of his number was killed, but he escaped after cutting a hole through a tent, despite having 3 bullets in his body, while the others were hanged by federal authorities. Became a guerrilla leader, waging such fierce warfare that the white settlers were compelled to withdraw from Arizona, particularly after the military forces were recalled to fight in the Civil War. A second troop of 3000 California volunteers put the Apaches to bay with their superior weaponry, but the war between the two cultures continued into the 1870s. Following the death of a fellow chief, he became the principal leader of the Chiricahuas, while the army waged a war of extermination against them. Led raids, along with 200 followers, from the Dragoon Mountains in southern Arizona, and managed to elude capture for over a decade. After a number of Apaches became scouts for the army in 1871, and many others agreed to unhappy reservation life, he surrendered in the fall of that year, but when his people were transferred to another reservation in New Mexico, he escaped the following year. Totally worn out, he gave himself up after a Chiricahua Reservation was established at Apache Pass, and maintained peace until his death two years later, probably from some sort of cancer. His elder son succeeded him as chief, and tried to maintain the peace agreement, but on his death, his younger brother joined forces with Chiricahua leader Geronimo (Jim Brown), and the reservation was dissolved in 1876. Inner: Fierce warrior, legendary figure. Spear-in-hand lifetime of being symbolically reborn with deep wounds into the vengeful white man’s world, but ultimately finding some sense of inner peace in acting out his warrior spirit and letting go of his deep anger.

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PATHWAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTIST AS ONGOING IMMIGRANT WARRIOR:
Storyline: The conservative but cocky warrior bridges continents in his desire to open himself up both emotionally and artistically, after many a go-round as a proper Prussian soldier, with an innate desire to do battle with himself to free the free spirit within.

Bruce Willis (Walter Bruce Willison) (1955) - American actor, producer and singer. Outer: Of British, Dutch, French and Welsh on his paternal side and German on his maternal Father was a welder, mechanic and pipe fitter, grew up in an industrial town, after having spent his first 2 years in Germany, where his sire had been stationed and had married his German-born mother. Oldest of 4, with 2 younger brothers and a sister. Stuttered as a child, although the impediment disappeared when he began acting and acting out in high school. His parents divorced when he was 16, after separating earlier, thanks to his father’s difficulty in expressing emotions. 6’, with blue eyes and overtly masculine.. Student council president, but also expelled for fighting and arrested for smoking marijuana. Studied theater at Montclair State College, which suddenly gave him direction, and he moved to NYC in the late 1970s. Spent 7 years living in a fifth floor walk-up, supporting himself as a bartender, while pursuing his career. Appeared in commercials, then began his adopted trade in earnest with an Off-Broadway lead in a Sam Shepard play. Flew out to Los Angeles to catch the 1984 Olympics, and finally struck gold, winning the co-lead in 1985 over 3000 applicants, in the popular TV series “Moonlighting,” with Cybill Shepherd, which lasted until 1989. Married actress Demi Moore in his early 30s, 3 daughters from the union, Rumer, Scout and Tallaluh Belle, all of whom became actresses. The pair became a Hollywood power couple, but eventually separated and divorced in his mid-40s. Nevertheless, able to actively accept her taking up with the much younger Ashton Kutcher, thanks to the importance he learned to place on fatherhood. Made his screen debut in Blind Date in 1987. His party animal escapades made him a tabloid favorite, particularly after being arrested for disturbing the peace in his Hollywood Hills neighborhood, as his career shifted into high gear with a series of macho adventure movies, beginning with Die Hard in 1988, earning him at that time, an unprecedented $5 million for it. Also willing to extend himself as an actor, playing supporting roles, and varying the characters he tackles, which extended his career considerably beyond the one-note actioner of some of his fellow hyper-stars. Eventually took the Die Hard franchise out into fourquel territory nearly 20 years later, as a reward for his being able to continually engage his audiences in a variety of fare. Co-owner of the highly successful restaurant chain Planet Hollywood, and, for a while, primary resident of Hailey, Idaho, investing strongly in the town until his marriage soured. Avowed Republican, after initially evincing himself as anti-nuke liberal, he actively campaigned for George H. W. Bush in his losing bid for re-election in 1992, although remains flexible enough to have a variety of opinions on a variety of issues. Despite some high-priced fiascos, one of planet Hollywood’s highest paid stars, and a force to be reckoned with in that town’s revolving firmament, while showing his innate maverick conservatism in his beliefs, rather than his actions. In 2009, he married model and actress Emma Heming, who is nearly two decades his junior. Two daughters from the union, his fourth and fifth all told. Made his Broadway debut in late 2015 in “Misery” an adaptation of a Stephen King story, although failed to impress the critics with his subdued performance. Has a net worth of $180 million. Inner: Cocky, earthy, self-confident, with a trademark smirk. Somewhat defensive and self-protective, self-deprecating and vulnerable. Ability to grow with his success, committed family man, strongly opinionated, and an actor of some depth, with the ability to both underplay and reveal subtlety of characterization. Cocksure lifetime, once again, of emigrating from Europe, albeit after only being born there, and continuing his pattern of serially opening himself up to the looser mien of America, through an immersion into and a subsequent conquest of its culture. Tom Santschi (Paul Santschi) (1876-1931) - Swiss/American actor. Outer: Father was a Swiss watchmaker, trained as a boy in that profession as well, although had little feel for it. His family migrated to the United States and he was raised in Kokomo, Indiana. Entered films in 1907, joining the Selig Co., and quickly became a stock player, most often playing villains, although he was also capable of brutish hero turns as well. In 1913, he married Lola Sage. Made a convincing, yet likable heavy, and appeared in scores of silents as such. His best remembered performance would by in The Spoilers, a 1914 eight reeler in which he and William Farnum (Val Kilmer) staged such a realistic fight, that both had to be carried from the set with multiple injuries. Did some directing in the mid-teens, and also penned one screenplay. An accomplished pianist, he had a passion for the newly invented automobile, crashed 6 of them in 1916. Also an avid big game hunter. Outdoorsy, 6’1”, 210 lbs. Good horseman and very athletic, his career spanned the silent era, and he just barely made it into the sound era, before he died in his sleep of a heart attack. Inner: Modest, cordial, retiring, seen as a male Sphinx, with his emotional life largely well-hidden. Had regular habits and was very Swiss in his self-control. Bridge lifetime of switching over into the acting mode after many martial go-rounds, in order to slowly open up his emotional side and free himself of his innately learned disciplines and constraints, an ongoing process that his basically conservative, but manly nature is still assaying. Friedrich von Steuben (Baron Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben) (1730-1794) - Prussian/American general. Outer: Father was a lieutenant of engineers in the Prussian army. Little is known of his youth, but he entered military service at 17, and emerged from the Seven Years War as a captain, at which point he was discharged, and served as a chamberlain in a petty German court, claiming the title of baron, although no documents ever proved it. After an unsuccessful attempt at resuming his military career in Europe, he promoted himself to the rank of lieutenant general in the King of Prussia’s service, and sailed to America with letters of introduction, arriving in late 1777. Impressed with his faux credentials, Gen. George Washington (George C. Marshall), made him acting inspector general and put him in charge of training Continental Army troops. Although he had to use an interpreter, he was extremely effective in instilling a Prussian sense of discipline in the fledgling American army, and rose in rank to major general, while writing a manual of regulations that remained in use until 1812. At its core was the prescription that love of country lay behind every successful citizen-soldier of a new-found nation, as well as confidence in both themselves and their officers, rather than fear of superiors, as was the case in the long-established polities of Europe. Although eager for a field post, he stayed a staff officer until war’s near end, when he became a successful division commander in the southern theater. After the war, he continued as a military adviser to Washington, until finally being discharged in 1784, after having been made a U.S. citizen the year before. Never married. Lived in NYC where his extravagant lifestyle caused him near bankruptcy. In 1790, Congress awarded him a lifetime annual pension, and he spent the rest of his life dividing his time between NYC and his upstate NY farm, where he died of apoplexy, while maintaining his interest in the military affairs of his adopted country. Inner: Of middle height, with good soldierly bearing and Prussian politeness. Dedicated, disciplined, able to win the affection of his subordinates through his flexibility and willingness to teach and learn from an alien culture. Not opposed to embellishing his past to allow him to totally re-create himself in a new environment. Steppingstone lifetime of making the transition between the Old World and the New in martial manner, in order to open himself up to the brave new world to come.

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PATHWAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTIST AS MANLY ACTOR:
Storyline: The glistening gladiator attacks his craft with the same intensity he formerly reserved for his enemies, and proves himself to be a superb craftsman in his adopted calling, in his gladiatorial ability to rise to all professional challenges thrown at him.

Russell Crowe (Russell Ira Crowe) (1964) - New Zealand actor, producer and musician. Outer: Of Welsh, Scottish, Scandinavian and British and Irish descent on his paternal side, with some Maori blood as well. Grandfather was a cinematographer, parents were location caterers. Moved to Australia when he was 4, and began acting at the age of 6, on a TV show. At 14, he was playing in bands, which led him into musical theater, and over 400 performances as Dr. Frank N. Furter in “The Rocky Horror Picture Show.”5’11 1/2”, with light brown hair and blue eyes as well as a strong masculine presence. Made his film debut in 1990 in Blood Oath. After a star turn in Romper Stomper as a neo-Nazi skinhead, and a press-baiting reputation, he achieved international status in 1997 as a raging, but vulnerable, cop in L.A. Confidential, easily mastering both the accent and the virility that the role demanded. Waited over a year before accepting his next part, refusing to be typecast in thuggish roles. Extremely well-prepared for all his characterizations, and totally into the sum effect of his films, willingly cutting his own screen-time for the ultimate product. Lead singer, guitarist and songwriter for 30 Odd Foot of Grunts. Owns a 600 acre farm in Australia, showing a kindness and gentleness to his animals that is totally out-of-keeping with his screen persona. Won an Academy Reward in 2001 for Best Actor for Gladiator, then followed it up with a highly believable performance as a schizophrenic Nobelist in A Beautiful Mind. Became involved with actress Meg Ryan, after working together with her, effectively ending her marriage, although the duo later split up, and he married actress Danielle Spencer in 2003, 2 sons from the union, which ended in separation in 2012. Remains an icon of masculinity, with periodic bad press for bad boy behavior, including a court appearance for tossing a telephone at a hotel clerk, which almost cost him his working life in the U.S. Dedicated screen artist, with the ability to chameleonically change with each role. Gifted with an innate understanding of the interiors of his characters, without compromising their outer force. It was later revealed that he was the object of a potential Al Qaeda kidnapping in 2001, in their mistaken identification of him as a symbol of American imperialism. Made a literal huge splash as Noah in 2014 in the Biblical epic of the same name, bringing an emotional muscularity to the part in what will probably prove a career highlight. Denied Australian citizenship several times because of immigration laws, despite having lived there since he was 4. Has a net worth of $75 million. Inner: Extremely intense perfectionist when it comes to craft, dominating personality, and a softie-at-heart when it comes to animals. Man’s man lifetime of channeling his considerable macho into nuanced performance, as he continues to delve deeper into the artist-within to integrate it with the virile icon without. Victor McLaglen (1886-1959) - English/American actor. Outer: Father was an Anglican clergyman, who later became Bishop of Clermont in South Africa. The eldest of 8 brothers, 5 of whom became actors. Served as a boy soldier in the Boer War for 3 years, before his parents forced his release, then was a boxer in Canada, touring in circuses and wild west shows, taking on all comers, before losing to heavyweight champion Jack Johnson (Magic Johnson) in 6 rounds in 1909. In between and afterwards, he worked as a wrestler, a prospector, a railroad cop and a vaudeville performer. 6’3”, 230 lbs. Served as a captain with the Irish Fusiliers during WW I, and for a while was provost marshal of Baghdad. Also acted as a physical trainer for the Raja of Ahola in India. Married Enid Lamont in 1917, who died in 1942, 2 children from the union, including director Andrew McLaglen. Began his movie career in Britain in 1920 with The Call of the Road, and then made his American film debut 4 years later with Beloved Brute. Won an Academy Reward in 1935 for playing the title role of Gypo Nolan in John Ford’s The Informer. Established a fraternal group in 1936, the Light Horse Troop, which were ready to go into battle if called, and also had an eponymous precision motorcycle team. Married his secretary, Suzanne Brueggeman, in 1943, divorced 5 years later. His 3rd marriage to Margaret Pumphrey was in 1948. Had a ranch in the San Joaquin Valley, where he raised horses and farmed. Worked his entire life, making a host of films both in the U.S. and the U.K., usually playing strongly masculine roles. Died of congestive heart failure, shortly after appearing in a film directed by his son. Inner: Rugged and manly, with a militaristic view, that was less political than patriotic. Despite his name, he was English to the core. Transition lifetime of trading in his saber for a celluloid sword in a largely well-received career that was limited by his ubermasculine physicality. Colin Campbell, 1st Baron Clyde (1792-1863) - Scottish field marshal. Outer: Father was a carpenter named MacIver. 5th son, one brother became an admiral. Showed himself to be daring from childhood on. Ran away at 15, and used his mother’s name when his uncle bought him an ensign’s place in the 9th Foot Brigade. Fought under the Duke of Wellington (Louis Montbatten) with distinction in the Peninsula War in 1811-1813, receiving several wounds. Rose to captain in 5 years, but it took him nearly 3 decades to gain a colonelcy. Took part in the ill-fated Battle of New Orleans in the U.S., and later helped suppress an insurrection in British Guiana in 1823. Fought in the First Opium War in China, then cemented his reputation during the Second Sikh War in India in 1849. Commanded the Highland Brigade at the battle of the Alma in 1854 and halted the Russians in the Crimean War. Appointed commander in chief in India at the outbreak of the Sepoy Rebellion in 1857, he directed both attacks and withdrawals, capturing the key city of Lucknow the following year, before leading the final operations against the rebels in Oudh. Heaped with honors at the end of his career. Made Baron Clyde for his services, with a pension of £2000 a year, and the thanks of a grateful nation. Promoted to field marshal a year before his death. Never married or sired any children. Buried in Westminster Abbey. Inner: Seen as a soldier’s soldier. Always concerned for his men’s welfare. Economical planner, often on the side of caution, but almost always victorious. Singing sword lifetime of pure martial expression, before opting for less dangerous stages to give greater expression to his strong masculinity.

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PATHWAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTIST AS UNFRIENDLY FRIENDLY WITNESS:
Storyline: The preternaturally old performer is forced to give up some of his associates as an act of self-preservation during paranoid times, then has to carry the deep hurt of his betrayal on a wounded heart that ultimately betrays him.

Lee J. Cobb (Lee Jacoby) (1911-1976) - American actor. Outer: Of Jewish descent. Father was a compositor for a Yiddish newspaper. Grew up in the immigrant enclaves of NYC’s Lower East Side, and showed himself to be a musical prodigy on both the violin and harmonica, although a broken wrist forestalled his dreams of a concert career. Ran away from home in his teens to Hollywood to try to break into film, and managed to make an appearance with Borrah Minevitch and his Harmonica Rascals in a two-reeler. Unable to find further work, he returned to NY, and enrolled at CCNY to study accounting at night, while selling radio tubes on commission during the day. 6’, 190 lbs., with a gruff, strongly masculine cast, and brown hair and blue eyes. Returned to Los Angeles again at the outset of the Depression, and got some stage experience at the Pasadena Playhouse, both as an actor and director, before making his Broadway debut with a bit part in Fyodor Doestoevsky’s (Alexander Solzhenitsyn) “Crime and Punishment,” then made his film debut in 1934 in a western, The Vanishing Shadow. The following year, he became part of the Group Theater, a leftist crew who did pro-proletariat drama, and established himself in several Clifford Odets’ dramas. During the 1930s, he became involved with numerous liberal causes as an activist, and supported several suspect organizations that were later revealed to be Communist fronts. Married actress Helen Beverley in 1940. 2 children from the union, including Julie Cobb, who became an actress and married actor James Cromwell. Alternated between the stage and screen in support roles, utilizing his roughhewn exterior for a number of memorable support turns in both media, with a break during WW II, when he was in the Army Air Force, during which time he was assigned to a radio production unit, and also appeared in a Moss Hart play. Got his pilot’s license after his discharge. His signature role would by as the original Willie Loman in Arthur Miller’s “Death of Salesman,” in 1949, which would be considered a seminal performance by many, even though Miller had written it with a much smaller man in mind, despite tailoring it for him. Seemingly born old, he often played far older than his age warranted, including an appearance as Yul Brynner’s father in The Brother’s Karamazov, despite being less than four years his senior. Also appeared in an earlier nonmusical version of Brynner’s signature role in “The King and I,” “Anna and the King of Siam,” thereby subtly linking twice with his crypto-brother. In the red hysteria of the post-WW II era, he was called before the House Un-American Activities Committee, although refused to appear for two years. The harassment his family received beforehand led to a complete breakdown by his wife, who had to be institutionalized, perhaps acting out what he could not, and the two divorced in 1952. Under threat of blacklist and losing his career, he finally appeared in 1953, and to the anger of some of his cohorts, cooperated and named names, handing over 20 people who had been putative members of the party. Later rationalized he had to do so to continue working and supporting his family, as well as relieve himself of the paranoia of constant government surveillance. Worked afterwards in On the Waterfront, with two other ‘friendly witnesses,’ Budd Schulberg and Elia Kazan, in what would be seen as a filmic apologia for their combined actions. Suffered a heart attack in 1956, but recovered to continue working. In 1957, he married Mary Hirsch, a Los Angeles schoolteacher, in a union that would last until his death. One son from the second union. Continued on TV, the stage and in filmdom, with a memorable valedictory turn as King Lear in 1968. Largely a character actor, he was still actively working into his 60s, when he died suddenly of a heart attack. Inner: Gruff, idealistic, and a dedicated craftsman hiding a deeper sensitivity behind an extremely crusty exterior. Always wanted to direct, and had far more of a love for live theater than film work. Born old lifetime of letting the accusatory nature of the times get to him and betray his ideals, in his own deeply internalized drama that would wind up overshadowing much of the superior work that he had done. Roman Bagration (1778-1834) - Georgian general. Outer: From an old Georgian royal family, whose Bagratid dynasty stretched back nearly a millennium. Father was a Georgian prince and colonel. Much younger brother of Gen. Pyotr Bagration (Yul Brynner), a genuine battlefield hero, giving him much to live up to when he assumed the same martial career. Enrolled in a Russian Cossack regiment at the age 13, and saw his first action three years later, fighting in Persia. Became a commissioned officer in 1802, and fought against France in 1805. At his sibling’s behest, he was dispatched to Georgia the following year, to meet with the local nobility, who had a list of grievances against the Russian administration of their state. Quickly recalled, he fought against the French again in Prussia, then volunteered for the Danube army, fighting against the Turks in 1809 and 1810, during which time he was promoted to colonel. Along with his brother, he served in the 3rd Western Army during Napoleon’s ill-fated invasion of Russia, which cost his celebrated sibling his life. Rewarded for bravery in battle, he was made a major general in 1813, and participated in several major sieges over the next two years. In the 1820s, he fought in the Caucasus, against the Turks and Persians, and by decade’s end he had become a lieutenant general. Settled in Tiflis, Georgia after the war, and his home became a cultural center, serving as a theater for the first public performance of “Woe from Wit,” by Alexander Griboyedov, in which he played the role of a colonel. Contracted a fever after being sent to Abkhazia, and died from its effects almost two years later. Inner: Highly competent martial artist, who did not let the legendary exploits of his far more famous sibling inhibit his own considerable skills. Noble lifetime of acquitting himself justly on the battlefield, before getting a brief taste at life’s near end of the arena in which he would next distinguish himself, and do further battle with a less conclusive result with his own interior sense of self.


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PATHWAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTIST AS BALD-FACED ENLIVENER:
Storyline: The winsome and lose some warrior utilizes his innate allure to easily make the transition from battlefield hero to celluloid leading man, using his unique physicality to excellent effect before ultimately falling prey to the self-inflicted wounds of smoking.

Yul Brynner (Yuli Borisovich Bryner) (1920-1985) - Russian/American/ Swiss actor. Outer: Fudged on his early beginnings to make himself even more exotic than he was. Mother was the daughter of a Russian doctor, father was a Swiss-Russian engineer and inventor, with 1/16th Mongolian ancestry, who abandoned the family. Taken to Manchuria to be educated at a YMCA school there, then brought to Paris by his mother, where he attended an exclusive lycee, only to drop out and become a musician, playing guitar in nightclubs with Russian gypsies. Later claimed he and his half/sister Vera, who became a concert singer, had been adopted by those verysame gypsies and brought to Paris by them. Later, he became a high-flying trapeze artist with the Paris Cirque d’Hiver, but almost crippled himself with a disastrous fall. 5’10”, 180 lbs., sinuous and catlike, with light brown eyes and dark brown hair, which he shaved off. Joined a repertory company after recovering as a stagehand and apprentice actor, while attending the Sorbonne. Came to the U.S. in 1941 to further his acting ambitions, and because of his fluency in several languages, he was recruited in 1942 by the US Office of War Information as a radio commentator in France, since his injuries prevented him from fighting. Appeared on the NY stage during this period, and did some very early TV work. Married in 1944 to actress Virginia Gilmore, and together they starred in the very first TV talk show in 1948, “Mr. and Mrs.” A son of the same name from the union, who became a his/storian and novelist, later wrote a biography of him, clearing up the mystery in which he had earlier enshrouded himself, “Yul: The Man Who Would Be King.” In 1946, he made his Broadway debut and 3 years later fashioned his film debut playing a narcotics smuggler, before turning his attention to fledgling TV as both an actor and director. Achieved stardom in 1951 on Broadway playing the King of Siam in “The King and I,” which would become his signature role. Shaved his head to give him his unique look, and parlayed that role into a film reprise, which won him an Oscar for Best Actor in 1956. With his fierce looks, and signature bald pate, he was able to fashion a highly successful international career in mixed fare, as an exotic action hero, most notably in The Brothers Karamazov, and The Magnificent Seven, sharing billing with his two crypto-warrior comrades, Charles Bronson and James Coburn in the latter, and with a crypto-brother Lee J. Cobb, in the former. Wrote “Bring Forth the Children,” in 1960, and the same year he divorced, after fathering an illegitimate daughter. Married Doris Kleiner, a Chilean model, later that annum, one daughter from the union. Divorced in 1967, he moved to Switzerland, to become a Swiss citizen. In 1971, he married a third time to Jacqueline Croisset, a French socialite and widow of a publishing executive. Two adopted Vietnamese children from the union, which also ended in divorce in 1981. In 1972, he returned to Hollywood, while also becoming an activist for gypsy rights. After a Broadway flop, he did a successful reprise of “The King and I.” Married a fourth time to Kathie Lee, a Malaysian dancer with his touring company, and continued with his farewell tour as the King of Siam, ultimately playing the part over 4500 times. A heavy smoker his whole life, he was diagnosed with lung cancer in 1983, and given only a few months to live. Died of lung cancer the same day as Orson Welles, with whom he once costarred, and was the poignant subject of commercials by the American Cancer Society afterwards, where he warned of the dangers of smoking in a voice from beyond the grave. Inner: Athletic, exotic, manly and regal. Kingly lifetime of clear identification with a royal role, as a unique actorly world figure, with the same innate draws towards self-destruction that he evinced as a martial artist of the first rank, in his focus on artistry, rather than martiality in this go-round. Prince Pyotr Bagratian (1765-1812) - Georgian general. Outer: Descended from the Georgian royal family. Father was a Georgian prince and a colonel. Older brother of Roman Bagration (Lee J. Cobb), who also became a general. Entered the Russian army in 1782, and served in the Caucasus against the Turks for several years, before taking part in the Polish campaign of 1794. Of average height, and thin, with wavy, brunette hair and an unhandsome hooked nose, which earned him the nickname from his soldiers as “the eagle.” His abilities were duly noted by the great general Alexander Suvorov, and he accompanied the latter on his subsequent Italian and Swiss campaigns, winning fame for capturing Brescia, taking a bullet in the leg while doing so, but refusing to give up his command. Extremely courageous, he led by example, suffering two more wounds in the victorious campaign, and after returning to Russia, was made chief of the jager regiments. In the 1805 campaign against Napoleon, he won further distinction by standing off superior French forces, and then covering his army’s retreat, serving as a perfect fighting complement for the strategies of his fellow commanders. Made a lieutenant general for his heroics. Subsequently became a legendary figure for his feats over the last part of the decade, particularly a forced march across the frozen Gulf of Finland against the Swedes in 1808. The following year he successfully took on the Turks again, and was made a full general. Became involved with the teenage grand princess Ekaterina, although she was forced to marry another, much to his disappointment, and he remained a bachelor, wed only to the battlefield. Completed his career in 1812, with the French invasion of Russia. Commanded the 2nd Army of the West, and engaged in a valiant rearguard action, which enabled him to link up with the main army under Mikhail Barclay de Tolly (Charles Bronson). In the pivotal battle of Borodino, he was severely wounded, and died several weeks later. Greatly mourned afterwards as a genuine national hero. Inner: Fearless and deeply respected by his men. Far more the battlefield gladiator than the strategist, with an excellent feel for rearguard action. Legendary lifetime of proving himself over and over in the arena of arms as a soldier’s soldier, rather than a general’s general. Louis II de Bourbon, 4th Prince de Condé (1621-1686) - French general and noble. Known as ‘the Great Condé.’ Outer: 2nd son of the 3rd prince of Condé, of the royal House of Bourbon. Mother was Charlotte-Marguerite de Montmorency (Tatum O’Neal). Younger sister was Anne Genevieve (Farrah Fawcett), with whom he was close. Given an excellent Jesuit education for 6 years, followed by a stint at the Royal Academy. Had a libertine youth, then was unhappily married in 1640 to the homely, dull and pious 13 year old niece of Cardinal de Richelieu (Henry Kissinger), whom his father had selected for him, despite his being passionately in love with another woman, Marthe du Vigean, who became his lifelong mistress. His wife’s ancestors had a long history of mental illness, which would bode ill for his descendants. Eventually he would lock her up, under the spurious charge of adultery. Began his military career with a series of spectacular victories, particularly against the Spanish in the Netherlands, and after his father died in 1646, he inherited an enormous estate and became prince de Condé. In the subsequent civil wars of the Fronde, his family’s power was attacked, and he wound up imprisoned for over a year in 1650. Subsequently became a leader of the rebellious nobles against the crown, along with his sister Anne-Genevieve, and Henri Turenne (Ferdinand Foch), the only other French general who was his equal on the battlefield. Eventually left for service with the Spanish in 1652 and had a death sentence placed on him as a rebel. Finally returned to serve Louis XIV (Charles de Gaulle) in 1660, and became one of his greatest generals, although the king was loath to give him commands until necessity forced him to do so. Entertained the possibility of the kingship of Poland, and held fantasies of reigning there. The rest of his active life was spent in doing largely successful battle in service of the crown. Succumbed to gout in his later years. Made a deathbed conversion to Catholicism, although an atheist his entire life. Succeeded by his son, the 5th prince (Luc Besson). Inner: Prideful, temperamental, extremely courageous and ambitious. Highly cultivated military adept, patron of the arts and theater, who surrounded himself with philosophers, artists and literary figures. Maintained a troupe of comedians who toured the provinces and was the protector of many writers. Excellent tactician, swift and decisive strategist, with no loss of his military skills even after being debilitated in later life. Captain courageous lifetime of giving full play to his unique character in an age that fully supported his many gifts, as well as his personality flaws. Tiberius II Constantius (?-582) - Byzantine Basileus. Outer: Origins unclear. After being betrothed to a daughter of a low-ranking army officer, only to see both her and her father die, he married her mother, Ino, with two surviving daughters from the union. Pursued a military career, rose to a command position, and served under the emperor Justin II (Sergei Kirov) in the Balkans to somewhat mixed results. When the latter began experiencing periods of insanity, the empress, Sophia, convinced her husband during a moment of lucidity to elevate him to the level of Caesar, and along with her, the two acted as joint regents. Sophia, however, kept him on a tight leash, doling out a meager allowance, while refusing to allow his wife and daughters in the palace. Adopted by Justin in 574 as his son, and named co-emperor by the end of the year. Four years later, Justin died soon after crowning him emperor, at which point he turned down a marriage proposal from Sophia. In turn, she began plotting with the general Justinian (Joseph Stalin) to overthrow him, although the scheme failed. Rather than punishing the two, he retaliated by keeping the empress under close surveillance and containment, while his wife, now renamed Anastasia, finally got to enjoy her spouse’s exalted status. Extremely popular during his 3 year reign because of his generous ways, he showed himself to be a pragmatist, ending the persecution of the monophysites, or believer in the singular divine and human nature of the Christ as contained in one body, in order to shore up Greek support in the provinces, at the cost of alienating western allies, whose religious views saw the former belief system as out-and-out heresy. Strengthened the power of the senate, as well as the army, establishing a new elite corps, which was to become the vaunted Varangian Guard. Proved successful in defending the empire to his east from the Persians, but was unable to stop the Slavs and Avars to the west and north. Proved far too liberal with finances, giving away thousands of pound of gold each year of his reign, to effectively balance the treasury with his improved armed forces. Rumor would have it, he was poisoned through a bowl of mulberries. Mortally ill, he turned over the throne to his commander, Maurice (Georgi Zhukov), and died the following day. Inner: Just, temperate and humane, as well as practical, with excellent administrative instincts, albeit far less of a feel for finances, due to an overly charitable nature. Large-hearted lifetime of trying to act in accordance with the direct needs of the citizens of his empire, only to fall victim to the innate greed and ambition of lesser figures in the top tiers of power.

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PATHWAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTIST AS WELL-LIKED WARRIOR:
Storyline: The arthritic actor cannot quite shake loose of the martial rigidities of the past, and does lasting battle with himself in his continuous desire to open up to his larger creative potential.

aJames Coburn (1928-2002) - American actor. Outer: Of Swedish, Irish and Scotch ancestry. Great-grandfather was a successful rancher, but his family lost its holdings during the Depression. Only child of an auto mechanic. Grew up in Compton, after his family moved there when he was 5. Quit Compton Jr. College to join the army, where he narrated army films, which gave him the impetus to seek out a show business career afterwards. He also worked as a disk jockey on army-sponsored radio stations. Studied acting at LA City College, USC and with Stella Adler in NYC. 6’3”, lean and craggy-faced with a toothsome grin. Made his stage debut at the La Jolla Playhouse in “Billy Budd.” Worked in commercials and plays in NYC, then TV in Los Angeles, before making his film debut in 1959 in Ride Lonesome. The same year, he married Beverly Kelly, son and step-daughter from the union, divorced in 1980. Played support roles and came to public attention as the knife-wielder in The Magnificent Seven. After numerous character roles, he became a star with the Derek Flint movies, in which he spoofed the popular spy films of the late 1960s. Devastated in the early 1970s by a rejection from “Cosmopolitan” magazine to be their first nude centerfold, he went into deep depression afterwards. Formed his own production company, Panpiper, and later Armageddon Productions, while delving into directing TV episodes. Close friend of actor Charles Bronson, as well as macho director Sam Peckinpah, serving as a second unit director for him. Collaborated on the martial arts story, Circle of Iron in 1978, although by the end of that decade, he began losing his box office cachet. Suffered from arthritis, a symbol of rigidity, through the 1980 and 1990s, eventually conquering it with sulfur pills, although one hand was left crippled. Returned to character roles in the late 1980s, and in 1993, he married a former TV newswoman, Paula O’Hara, who was 17 years his junior. Capped his career in 1998 with an Academy Reward for best supporting actor in Affliction. Appeared in more than 100 films. Died of a massive heart attack at home, while listening to music with his wife. Inner: Extremely well-liked, with an intensity to all he undertook. Affliction lifetime of breaking partway through past rigidities, while still harboring insecurities about his innate masculinity. aFrederick Roberts, Baron Roberts of Kandahar, Earl Roberts (1832-1914) - British field marshal. Known as “Bobs.” Outer: Son of a knighted general, mother had been a military widow. One younger brother. Commissioned in the Bengal artillery in 1851, he was appointed to the quartermaster general’s staff 5 years later, and saw considerable action during the Indian Mutiny of 1857, receiving a Victoria Cross for bravery the following year. With his health broken and in convalescence, he married Nora Bews, the daughter of a captain in 1858, who was taller than he was and a forceful character. In his later years, she had considerable influence over him. 6 children from the close union, with 3 dying in infancy. Served in various theaters as he rapidly rose in rank, thanks to his battlefield expertise and his successful politicking with his superiors. Scored the decisive victory in the 2nd Afghan War in 1880, and from 1885 to 1893, he was commander in chief in India, where he improved the training and well-being of the army. Made a baron in 1892, and a field marshal 3 years later. Became 2nd commander in chief in South Africa in 1899 during the Boer War, and was able to stem British defeats there. Relinquished his position to his former chief-of-staff, Horatio Kitchener (Charles Bronson), the following year, while the two oversaw the ultimate British victory there. Became commander in chief in 1901, the same year he was made a viscount and an earl, and in 1904, he retired to devote himself to advocating conscription and marksmanship. Visited France during the early going in 1914, but fell ill with pneumonia and died. His barony became extinct since his 2 sons both predeceased him, but his earldom and viscounty continued through his daughters. Wrote his autobiography, “Forty-one Years in India” in 1897. Inner: Professional through-and-through with a great concern for his men, winning their loyalty and affection. Skillful, bold and energetic commander and administer. Dutiful lifetime of bringing his martial expertise to its peak, allowing him to search out other venues of expression in his next go-round to complement his disciplined professionalism.

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PATHWAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTIST AS HIGH & LOW-FLYER:
Storyline: The red-faced and red-baiting baron switches combat arenas from the battle-scarred skies to talk TV, deliberately amping up his oft-staged confrontations for the delight of his yob audience, in a performance artist go-round, geared far more for sound byte and fury, than significant victory or defeat.

Wally George (Walter George Pearch) (1931-2003) - American talk show host. Outer: Mother was a former child vaudeville actress, while his father was an English sailor who became a shipping company owner. Suffered with a stutter as a child, while growing up in an east San Francisco Bay suburb. Moved with the former to Los Angeles at 14, and became a teenage DJ in Glendale, which helped him get over his stuttering problem. 5’9”. Married Lillian Kammings in 1954 and divorced. Married Jane Eager in 1958, and divorced soon after the birth of Rebecca De Mornay, an actress from whom he would become permanently estranged, largely because of his political stances and disapproval of both her lifestyle and friends. In 1969, he launched his own eponymous FM show, which proved popular, and three years later, he became a producer and co-host with Mayor Sam Yorty on his weekly TV political gabfest. 5’9”, with trademark blonde hair, and an ultimate costume of blue blazer, gray slacks and an American flag tie, as a human emblem of staunch showboating American patriotism. Began his own talk show in 1979, and moved it to another station in 1982, which was owned by singer Pat Boone, before launching “The Hot Seat,” the following annum, a deliberately provocative affair that he labeled “Combat TV.” Deliberately insulted and irked his guests, some of whom would be professional actors pretending to be liberals and other assorted leftist loonies, and often kicked them off his show, much to the delight of his largely undiscriminating collegiate audiences, who would hoot and holler in adolescent approval at his antics. Despite genuinely holding many of his arch-conservative beliefs, he was far more interested in issuing exaggerated tirades as a ratings ploy, than in creating any sort of meaningful dialogue with those with whom he disagreed. Made numerous cameo appearances in films, playing himself, and for a while, was a media personality, before his act finally ran cold. Married and divorced a third time, with one daughter from the union, to whom he would be extremely close. In 1990, he married Mary Jo Tiepl, and divorced a third time, with one daughter from the union. Involved in a car crash in 1996, and was plagued by health problems afterwards, including several bouts with cancer, which he discovered after a fall at home. Divorced in 1998, and the following year he was forced to declare bankruptcy, thanks to his failing health and the mismanagement of his finances. Penned his autobiography at the same time. Finally forced by his declining vitality to give up his show after two decades, and died soon after of pneumonia. Inner: Contentious, conservative and highly combative, although an actor at heart, with the ability to feign far more self-righteousness than situations warranted. Mock crusader lifetime of switching arenas, in order to open himself up more emotionally through heated argument, rather than calculating strategy, as in his martial past, before ultimately internalizing his anger, and being forced to exit through a body riddled by unbridled rage. Manfred von Richtofen (1892-1918) - German air ace. Outer: From a family of the Prussian nobility, with his father a reserve major in the German army. Oldest of three brothers, including Lothar, who would become another daring air ace, with one older sister. Distant relative of Frieda von Richtofen Lawrence (Rebecca De Mornay). Had an athletic outdoorsy upbringing, and was both home educated and at the local school. Began his military training at the age of 11 at a military academy. On completing his formal education in 1911, he joined a cavalry unit, and fought with it at the outset of WW I, although the new implements of war, particularly trenches, barbed wire and machine guns, quickly made the cavalry an outmoded relic of the past. Relegated to infantry work, which he found totally unsatisfactory, he applied to the newly formed Air Service, and was granted admittance in 1915. Began his celebrated airborne career as a reconnaissance mission observer, and had his first kill as such with his observer’s machine-gun, although was not credited with it. Began training as a pilot, and in 1916, downed a French plane from his two-seater, although once again, was not given credit for it. Selected for an elite fighter squadron later that year, he won his first official aerial dogfight over France, and commissioned a silver cup replete with the date and enemy aircraft made to commemorate it, a practice he would continue for his next 60 victories, before silver became too precious a commodity to employ for such endeavors. Far more the student of aerial combat than a derring-do gladiator like his brother, he relied on his deadly marksmanship and tactical abilities as a squadron commander. His favorite ploy would be to attack from above, using the sun as a blinding shield, while his fellow pilots covered his rear. Scored one of his most impressive victories over British ace Lanoe Hawker in late 1916, which convinced him he needed a more agile aircraft. Subsequently changed planes several times, while continuing to rack up his impressive amount of kills, making him an air legend with a host of nicknames, including the one he would become best known for in English, ‘the Red Baron,’ thanks to his brightly painted aircraft. Won the “Blue Max” Germany’s highest martial award at the time, in early 1917, and continued his impressive record throughout the year, while also training other elite pilots, while remaining at a captain’s rank. Sustained a serious head wound, and while convalescing, had his autobiography ghost written for him, as part of the German propaganda machine. Although he returned to duty, his injury caused him lasting damage, subjecting him to nausea and severe headaches, while darkening his character considerably. In late 1917, he switched to the Fokker triplane, a three-winged aircraft with which he would become most closely associated, despite only recording a quarter of his unofficial self-claimed 80 kills in it. Refused to be grounded, even though the German High Command felt his death would be a bitter blow to the war effort because of his legendary status. Subequently killed in a dogfight with a British Sopwith Camel, when a stray bullet entered his heart and lungs. Able to land his aircraft, but died moments later, his reputation underscored by his heroic death. His last words were reputedly, “Kaput,” or ‘finished.’ Controversy would remain about who deserved the final kill over him, with most experts feeling the fatal shot was fired from the ground and not the air. His death would also be ascribed to his own diminished capacities from his earlier head wound, making it a subconscious suicide to coincide with Germany’s official defeat a half year later. Inner: Brilliant tactician and strategist, always led by example, while trying to manipulate all elements of combat to his advantage. Distant, humorless and largely unemotional, with a preternatural skill for aerial combat. Legendary lifetime of transliterating longheld cavalry skills to the air, to become an ubermensch of the skies, before returning in far more abrasive form, to try to open his naturally conservative and concealed nature to the far more demanding, and often more deadly, arena of interrelationships.

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PATHWAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTIST AS WARRIOR THROUGH-AND-THROUGH:
Storyline: The charismatic chief serves as teacher and exemplar of the warrior way, while trying to deal with a larger culture not of his making, and his own unintegrated sense of the feminine, within it.

Jim Brown (James Nathaniel Brown) (1936) - American athlete, activist and actor. Outer: Of African-American descent. Father was a professional boxer who deserted the family when he was an infant. Didn’t see his mother from the ages of 2-7. Raised on a Georgia Island by his great-grandmother until he was 7, then joined his mother, who worked as a domestic on Long Island, initially experiencing culture shock. Soon showed extraordinary athletic prowess, playing football, baseball and lacrosse, an old Amerindian game, at Manhasset High. Won an athletic scholarship to Syracuse Univ., but was originally passed over in favor of white athletes. As soon as he was allowed to play, however, he proved unstoppable as a running back, winning All-American honors in both football and lacrosse. 6’2”, 230 lbs, sculpted body, handsome and virile. Had an equally spectacular career as a Hall-of-Fame running back in the NFL for the Cleveland Browns, with many considering him the greatest at his position who ever played the game. He would get up slowly after each play, so that his opponents would never know if he were hurt or not, but never missed a game due to injury. In a nine year career, from 1957-1965, he set numerous records, while leading the league in rushing 8 times. Married in 1958, 3 sons from the union, divorced in 1972. Formed the Black Athletic Union while still active as player, that used professional athletes as facilitators for black run projects. Retired at his pinnacle, and embarked on a movie career, as an action star, beginning in 1964,with Rio Conchas. Went on to forge a workman career during the 1970s, as one of the first black stars allowed to flex his maleness. Found innocent of assault and battery charges in 1965. Threw a model from a balcony in 1968, but she refused to press charges. Used his celebrity to form Vital Issues in 1986, which became Amer-I-can 3 years later, a program to raise self-esteem and empower urban gang members and convicted felons. Developed a 15 step course in personal responsibility, while showing society’s forgotten men the larger way of the warrior. In 1997, he married a 23 year old, Monique Brown, one child from union. Had difficulty in restraining his innate aggressiveness with women, resulting in court action and tabloid headlinesthroughout his career, marring an otherwise strong showing as a warrior willing to walk his talk. His later filmwork expanded his ongoing role as a teacher of the masculine to unsettled times. Has a net worth of $50 million. Inner: Proud and teacherly, with an extremely strong sense of the male. Fourth and goal lifetime of bringing longheld warrior principles to the inner city tribes, while dealing with his own strengths and weaknesses in the process. Geronimo (Goyathlay) (1829-1909) - Amerindian warrior. Outer: Of Bendonkohe Apache descent, he was born in the Gila wilderness in New Mexico and raised in southern Arizona. Given the name Goyathlay, ‘one who yawns.’ Medium-sized, stocky, with a great chest. Admitted to the tribal warrior council in his mid-teens, and took on their ongoing fight with the Spaniards and the Americans for their land, as well as their long tradition of raiding for booty and captives. Made several marauding forays into Mexico, with Cochise (Jeff Chandler) where he picked up the name ‘Jerome’, or ‘Geronimo,’ from his adversaries, who slew his wife, mother and children in 1850, breeding within him an undying hatred for Mexicans. Developed into a master guerrilla warrior in his repeated vengeance raids, shaping a highly effective small band of warriors around his exploits. Although never a true chief, he was both feared and revered as a warrior and leader. Also a medicine man, with reputed superhuman powers. When 4000 Apaches were forcibly removed from their land in 1874, and put on a reservation wasteland, he became the leader of the resistance for the next decade, foiling all attempts by the U.S. Army to capture him, while taking revenge on western settlements, and often just trying to survive, using the northern Mexican mountains as his base. Finally surrendered in 1884, only to escape with a rebellious crew, do ultimate battle with his last 35 warriors and at long last be forced into submission in the fall of 1886. Put under government confinement, and sent to Florida, then Alabama, before permanently settling in 1894 in Fort Sill in Oklahoma to try the white man’s road. Became a farmer and joined the Dutch Reformed Church in 1903, although was eventually expelled for compulsive gambling. Enjoyed being a celebrity during his endlife period amd wound up selling artifacts of himself at expositions. Dictated his autogbiography, “Geronimo, His Own Story, ” before he died, after riding back to the post following a drinking spree, falling off his horse, and lying in some weeds all night, where he contracted a fatal case of pneumonia. Not long after his burial, a small band of his former warriors dug up his remains and secreted them in a hidden place, off the white man’s reservation, allowing him one final escape, and a last ghostly laugh. A myth would later rise that the Skull and Bones Society of Yale Univ. had stolen his remains in 1918 to use in their ceremonies, although it is probably apocryphal. His name would often be invoked by U.S. paratroopers during WW II as they were about to leap into the fray. Inner: Fierce, shrewd, and free, with an extremely strong sense of self. Regretted killing children in his vengeance raids, which were fueled by sheer rage. Mythic lifetime of trying to stick it to the man for as long as he could, before ultimately adopting his ways as a means of reintegrating his unapologetic feral nature to the non-warrior world.

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PATHWAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTIST TURNED APOCALYPTIC VISIONARY:
Storyline: The action-oriented medicine man opts to pursue his creative bent full-time in what he considers one continuous film as an Australian New Waver very much interested in finding personal meaning in a totally chaotic world
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George Miller (George Miliotis) (1945) - Australian director, screenwriter, producer and physician. Outer: Parents were Greek refugees from the island of Kythira to Australia, and anglicized their names from Miliotis to Miller. Elder of four sons, including a fraternal twin, with his youngest brother Bill a film producer. After secondary school, he studied medicine at the Univ. of New South Wales, along with his twin John, graduating in 1971. While there he made a one-minute short with another brother that won first prize in a student competition. Went to a film workshop at Melbourne Univ. where he found a production partner in Byron Kennedy, and the two formed Kennedy Miller Productions that lasted until the latter’s death in a helicopter crash in 1983. Kept his name in the company, and added Doug Mitchell in 2009 to become Kennedy Miller Mitchell. In 1985, he married Australian actress Sandy Gore, one daughter from the union, which ended in divorce. While completing his residency, he also did short experimental films. Made his feature length directorial debut with Mad Max in 1979, which he co-scripted, and worked as an Emergency Room physician in order to raise money for it. The apocalyptic futuristic tale of road warriors made fellow Australian Mel Gibson an international star, while the subsequent tri-part franchise produced between 1979 and 1985 became cult classics, with its spare outback landscapes and overweening macho characters, thanks in part to his immersing himself in the works of Carl Jung at the time. Part of a movement dubbed the “Australian New Wave,” he did numerous series for Australian TV in the 1980s, as well as The Witches of Eastwick, based on a John Updike novel, although had difficulty initially with the material. Turned to Australian productions afterwards, and helped fellow Aussie Nicole Kidman launch her international career through them. Returned to directing in the 1990s and had two hits with his co-authoring of Babe, a two pictures series about a pig raised by sheepdogs. In 1995, he wed Margaret Sixel, two sons from the union, which would also see her working in close partnership with him in some capacity on all his films. In his eclectic oeuvre, he created Happy Feet, an animated musical about tap-dancing penguins, which proved quite popular and got him a 2006 Oscar for Best Animated Film. After more than 15 years in the making, he returned to his Mad Max franchise in 2015 with Tom Hardy taking over the title role, in an over-the-top display of mayhem and special effects, which also turned into a paean to powerful women, who were absent in the original trio. Inner: Thoughtful, and willing to take chances in his output, exploring a variety of genres. Feels all of his films are one and the same as one long musical piece. Hard-wired for the imaginative life, constantly playing with ideas, while gradually becoming a feminist after many a year of focusing on male-dominated films. Feels cinema is a kind of public dreaming, and that movies “sing us into being.” Medicine man lifetime of discovering his internal workings are the best possible pathway to healing that he could ever be on. Panagiotis Danglis (1853-1924) - Greek general and politician. Outer: From a military family, Father was a major general. Graduated at the top of his class from the Hellenic Army Academy in 1878 as a 2nd Lieutenant of Artillery. Did further studies in Belgium then returned as a captain and was appointed adjutant to the general in charge of a French military mission which was helping modernize the Greek army during the mid-1880s. Served in an artillery regiment, and invented the 75 mm Schneider-Dangli mountain gun in 1893, which could easily be broken down for transport, although an engineering corps major also claimed credit for it. Convinced a French armament company to construct it, and it was ultimately deemed superior in 1907 to the one his rival had built via a German company. Continued teaching and during the Greco-Turkish War of 1897, he was made chief of staff of the I Brigade, before transferring to the newly formed General Staff in 1904. Supervised operations in the Salonica area during the latter stages of the Macedonian Struggle between Greeks, Bulgarians, Serbs and others in Ottoman Macedonia. Made a Major General in 1911, he was appointed head of the Army General Staff in 1912, as a counterbalance to more royalist and Germanophile officers. During the First Balkan War, he continued his staff work, ultimately rising to Lieutenant General in command of the Epirus Army Corps. After the outbreak of WWI, he left the army and entered politics as a member of the Liberal Party of Eleftherios Venizelos. Elected an MP for Epirus, he became Minister for War. When Greece entered WW I in 1917, he was made nominal commander-in-chief of the Greek army. At war’s end, he returned to parliamentary office and in 1920, he was formally discharged from the army. A year later, he succeeded Venizelos as president of the Liberal Party. Died of natural causes. Inner: Competent and inventive martial artist with a sure sense of leadership and command. Martial artist lifetime of following family military tradition and rising as high as he could, before ultimately deciding to pursue the inventive part of his nature the next time around in this series.


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PATHWAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTIST AS AGGRESSIVE CONTROVERSIALIST:
Storyline: The outspoken independent enlists his flamboyant character in service of rehabilitating his earlier life reputation as a scapegoat by continually standing up for himself as a brash emblem of self-righteous reform
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Jesse Ventura (James George Janos) (1951) - American politician, wrestler and TV show host. Outer: Of German descent on his maternal side and Slovak descent on his paternal side. Mother was a nurse, and father worked for the city of Minneapolis as a steam fitter. Both parents served in WW II. The younger of two brothers, he was raised as a Lutheran. On graduating high school, he enlisted in the U.S. Navy and became a member of one of its Underwater Demolition Teams, which would later merge with the Seals, after he left the service. Made over 100 parachute jumps, as well as many deep-sea dives, although never saw actual combat. Honorably discharged in 1973, he joined the Mongols, a motorcycle gang, and beefed himself up to 6’4”, and 200+lbs. Never involved himself in any of the criminal activities of his fellow bikers. In 1975, he wed Theresa Larson Masters, son and daughter from the close union. Became a professional wrestler under the sobriquet of Jesse “the Body” Ventura, taking the name of a California city, and playing the villain role during his ten years on the pro circuit. Although a mediocre wrestler, he won several championships on the dint of his flamboyant charisma, replete with shaved head and feather boa while also becoming a color commentator for WWF in 1985, before quitting the following annum, because of a pulmonary embolism, which he felt was caused by exposure to Agent Orange in Vietnam. Became an actor, appearing in such films as 1987’s Predator, as well as doing small screen series work and large screen support action roles. At the urging of his wife, he ran for mayor of Brooklyn Park, a suburb of Minneapolis and scored an upset victory over an 18 year incumbent, only to come into conflict with city council members of both major parties which stopped him from implementing much of his agenda, although he did elicit local interest by his constituency in city politics. Did not seek re-election and returned to previous role as a wrestling commentator afterwards. In 1994 he sued the WWF for $2 million, claiming that were cheating him out of videocassette royalties and won the case, ultimately collecting $810,000. Returned to acting in support roles in several high profile films, while hosting several Minnesota radio talk shows. In 1997, he ran for governor of Minnesota as a Reform Party candidate, and did well enough in debates to win to the surprise of everyone. Became the first Reform Party candidate ever elected to any state of federal office, although once again many of his efforts were blocked, and he chose to serve only one term, stating that the media was focusing far too much on his personal life and far too little on his policies. Also became quite disgusted with all the Reform Party infighting, which made it largely dysfunctional. Chose to live in his own home rather than the governor’s mansion and was able to effect some reforms, but not as many as he wished. After stepping down he was succeeded as governor by a conventional Republican. While in office, he penned his auto-biography “I Ain’t Got Time to Bleed,” a line he spoke in Predator. Afterwards, he divided his time between Cabo San Lucas in Baja Mexico and Minneapolis, while hosting “Conspiracy Theory with Jesse Ventura” for three seasons, beginning in 2009. revisiting various controversial governmental doings with a team of investigators, including the Kennedy assassination, 9/11, global warming and a host of other issues, leaving the viewer to make up his or her own mind about them. Filed a $1.8 million lawsuit against the estate of Chris Kyle, a former Navy Seal and subject of American Sniper. In a book he penned before he was killed, he claimed Ventura had insulted the Navy Seals which led to a bar fight in which the latter was beaten. Proved the canard wrong in court and won his suit. Also serves as a visiting fellow at Harvard Kennedy School of Government. Mentioned as a possible running mate by Donald Trump, in a match-up of colossal egos, although holds both major political parties in contempt. Asked to run by the Libertarians, but couldn’t commit to giving 100% to the presidency if he won. Has written and co-authored a number of books, all with conspiratorial political themes. His 2016 offering, “Jesse Ventura’s Marijuana Manifesto” gives compelling reason for the legalization of marijuana, for both medicinal and recreational purposes, replete with its longtime intertwining with American his/story for the good. Inner: Strongly opinionated and unafraid of expressing controversial views, with great hostility towards the Bush/Cheney tandem. Feels organized religion is a sham and crutch for the weak-minded, with a particular hostility towards fundamentalists. Nevertheless, a great supporter of religious freedom. Full of himself lifetime of bringing his outsized personality to bear in a host of public domains, in a subconscious need to rehabilitate himself from the charges made against him for his failures in his previous go-round in this series. Walter C. Short (Walter Campbell Short) (1889-1949) - American general. Outer: Father was a physician. Had a comfortable small town upbringing. Graduated the Univ. of Illinois in 1901 and became a math teacher at the Western Military Academy for a year, before accepting a commission in the U.S. army in 1902. Spent five years with an infantry division based in Ft. Reno, Oklahoma, where he became friends with George C. Marshall, later army chief of staff. Served overseas in the Philippines, then with a variety of stateside commands, becoming secretary of the Army School of Musketry and commander of an infantry division. In 1914, he married isbael Dean, one son from the union. Served with distinction in France as a staff officer and received a DSM for his development of machine gun tactics and the training of machine gunners. Saw action in several large battles, and was temporarily promoted to lt. colonel. Ended the war in the training section of the Army General Staff. Afterwards, he was named asst. chief of staff for training the Third Army. His rise in the military hierarchy was slow but steady, via holding various instructor and staff positions. By 1938, he had become a brigadier general in command of an infantry brigade in NY. Two years later, he was a major general in command of a division, and the following annum, Marshall, now chief of staff, assigned him to command the Army’s Hawai’ian Dept. where he was responsible for the ground defense of the islands, and jointly responsible with the U.S. Navy for the its air defense. Misinterpreted war warnings sent him in late November of 1941, and a week later, was totally unprepared for the bombing attack on Pearl Harbor on 12/7/1941, which was known by some in the highest levels since the Japanese code had been broken. That information, hoever, was held from him, because the President, Franklin Roosevelt, wanted to use the tragedy to draw isolationist America into WW II, as a means of bringing the country out of its decade long economic depression. Suspended from command pending an investigation afterwards, and was found guilty by a Presidential Board, along with the Naval commander Husband Kimmel, of dereliction of duty in 1942. As a result he was immediately forced to retire from the service. During his command he had given top priority to potential sabotage by the Japanese population in Hawai’i, while feeling an air attack was only a remote possibility. Worked for the Ford motor company afterwards, and died at his home of a chronic heart. ailment. Buried at Arlington National Cemerery. Eventually exonerated some 50 years after his death by a Senate resolution, although he was never given a presidential pardon. Inner: Honest and competent, showing himself to be a good instructor and staff officer. Probably deliberately misled as to the potential of a Japanese air attack on Pearl Harbor in order to insure America’s entry into WW II. Scapegoat lifetime of bearing the brunt of the blame for the governmental machinations of those in the highest rung of power, who wanted to drag the U.S. into WW II for their own larger economic and political reasons.


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PATHWAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTIST AS MUSCULAR BIRDMAN:
Storyline: The bare-knuckled acrobat flies through the air with the greatest of ease, bringing an unusual intelligence to his physical act, until finally landing without a net on his own vulnerabilities and disappearing into his own darkness.

Burt Lancaster (1913-1944) - American actor. Outer: Of Irish descent. Mother was a 5’9” beauty, and ultimately a volatile 250 pounds, with a raging temper, which her son would inherit. Father was a postal clerk. 4th of 5 children. Grew up in a tough NYC neighborhood, hit 8 times by cars, excellent athlete, 6’2” by the time he was 14, well-muscled, with blue eyes and blond hair. Had a lifelong fondness for books, won an athletic scholarship to NYU but, bored with academia, quit in his sophomore year and joined the circus as an acrobat. Teamed up with a boyhood friend as Lang & Cravat. The duo worked steadily for 5 years with a variety of circuses, including Barnum & Bailey, although he felt he wanted to speak as well as athletically perform. Quit to work in the WPA Theater Project, but eventually rejoined his partner. Shortly afterwards, one of his fingers became infected, and he was given the choice of quitting or having it amputated. In 1935, he married June Ernst, the daughter of a prominent circus family, separated after 3 years and divorced after 10. Held a variety of jobs, before retuning to NYC as a booking agent, then was drafted, and served in Special Services as a page turner for a soldier pianist. Met his future wife, Norma Anderson, a USO entertainer, who steered him towards NYC after the war. The twosome were married the following year, 2 boys and 3 girls from union, although he was largely a homophile after producing his family. Mistaken by producer Harold Hecht in a NY elevator as an actor, and the duo went on to a long and productive partnership. Became a bona fide star from his very first screen role in his early 30s as an ex-fighter in The Killers, and worked steadily afterwards. Returned briefly to the circus as an acrobat, which inspired The Flame and the Arrow, in which he partnered with his old acrobatic team/mate, and garnered plaudits galore for his intelligent swashbuckling athleticism. Alternated between athletic roles and serious drama, while forming his own production company, initially called Norma Productions after his wife, and then Hecht-Hill-Lancaster. Lifelong friend of actor Kirk Douglas. Satirized columnist Walter Winchell in The Sweet Smell of Success, and won that influential gossip/monger’s undying enmity, although it had little affect on his career or life. Won an Oscar in 1960 for his title role in Elmer Gantry. Also memorable as The Birdman of Alcatraz. His marriage broke up after 25 years, but he continued working, returning to the Broadway stage in his early and late 60s. Social activist, giving much time and energy to medical causes. Underwent heart bypass surgery in his mid-70s, but was able to return to the screen afterwards, ultimately making 72 films between 1946 and 1989. Remarried in his late 70s to Susan Martin, a television producer, and suffered a debilitating cerebral stroke two months later, while visiting a friend in a hospital. Partially paralyzed and wheelchair bound, he spent his last 4 years in seclusion before his death from a heart attack. Inner: Deep physical intelligence to all his work, with a trademark toothsome smile and clearly enunciated speech. Outspoken, liberal, private, sensitive, widely read. Also arrogant and argumentative at times, with an explosive temper that would leave him apologetic afterwards for his unexplained lack of control. Always felt he would share his mother’s fate of dying of a stroke. Atheistic, but with a belief in fairness and equality. Bisexual, with an equal magnetism for both sexes. Deliberate shutdown at life’s end for reflection and forced dependence, before exiting through his heart. Acrobatic lifetime of integrating his physical and intellectual sensibilities through acting, while evincing a strong and sympathetic heart in most that he did, before ultimately being knocked out by his own frailties. Jem Mace (James Mace) (1831-1910) - English pugilist. Outer: Father was a tenant farmer. One of 4 brothers, the other 3 became blacksmiths. As a youth, he became an apprentice cabinet-maker, then traveled with a show booth, playing the fiddle and giving boxing exhibitions, challenging all comers to either bare-knuckle or gloved bouts. A former boxer and showman took an interest in his career, and he became a professional in his early 20s. Although only 160 pounds, he had fast reflexes and a highly effective left jab, using his brainpower and analytic abilities to compensate for his lack of bulk. Won the English middleweight championship in his late 20s from Joe Goss (Mark Wahlberg), and the heavyweight championship a year later, before touring with a circus. Beat his former student, Tom King (Kirk Douglas), who outweighed him by 25 lbs., after studying his fighting style, an unusual practice of the time, then lost to him in the rematch, but regained it the following year when his adversary refused to fight him again, although he later picked a fight with him on the street. After a hue and cry rose in England over “the ruffians of the ring,” he toured Australia giving exhibitions. Visited North America nearly a decade later and won what was considered the World Championship from Tom Allen, then successfully defended it against Jim Coburn (Robert Ryan) in 1871. Became the last world heavyweight champion under the bare-knuckle London Prize Ring Rules. Retired the following year, to the great esteem of his countrymen. At the advanced age of 59, he returned to the ring, only to suffer defeat. Also a circus performer, as well as an inn/keeper during his fighting days. His acceptance of the Queensberry rules helped to ease the way for gloved fights. Married twice late in life, one child. Gave sparring exhibitions until his death, acting as a teacher til the end. Inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1997. Inner: High integrity, well-loved figure, and a scientist of the ring. Bare-knuckled lifetime of bringing his intelligence and physicality to a rowdy sport and giving it a more refined and defined basis. Young Dutch Sam (Sam Elias) (1808-1843) - English pugilist. Outer: Of Jewish descent. Illegitimate son of Dutch Sam (Kirk Douglas), a hard-drinking fighter who died when his son was 8. 5’9”, 145 lbs. Began his own career at the age of 15, and was recognized as welterweight champion by his 20s, and is considered the best fighter and sparrer in that division that England ever produced. Extremely graceful, with the same ironfisted power as his father. Never lost a fight, and was able to retire undefeated with one draw, after 11 bouts. Kept company with the worst of the aristocracy and died prematurely, just as his sire had, from drink related organ failure and lung disease. inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 2002. Inner: Like father, like son lifetime of showing himself to be an unstoppable gladiator in the ring, but prone to self-destruction outside of it, curtailing his existence, and necessitating a return to the same arena to re-integrate himself and his creative abilities, around a fuller and more longlasting go-round.

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PATHWAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTIST AS MACHO MAN:
Storyline: The unsinkable champion does taut-jawed battle with his own lust for life, and is able to rise again and again, showing himself a strong match for every opponent thrown at him short of death itself.

Kirk Douglas(Issur Danielovitch/Isidore Demsky) (1918) - American actor, director, producer and writer. Outer: Parents were illiterate Belarussian Jewish immigrants. Mother never learned English. Later limned his background in "The Ragman’s Son." Only son of 7 children. Worked as a waiter and janitor to put himself through St. Lawrence Univ., where he won an intercollegiate wrestling championship. Later labored as a professional wrestler, among other occupations, in order to attend the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, after amateur stagework in college. Suffered anti-Semitism growing up and in college, and legally changed his name to Kirk Douglas, after disconnecting from his religion at 14. 5’9”, and extremely virile, with light brown hair and blue eyes. Had 2 small roles on Broadway, then served in the Navy as a lieutenant during WW II. After the war, he returned to Broadway, did some radio, and then went out West to Hollywood, beginning as a lead in The Strange Love of Martha Ivers, in which he played against type as a weakling, before scoring a huge success in Champion, in which he portrayed a self-serving, and self-destructive boxer. Known as “Hollywood’s Jewish Goy,” because of his nordic features, which ironically had earlier made him unsuitable for the Yiddish theater. Married Diana Dill at 27, 2 sons from the union, including actor/producer Michael Douglas, divorced 7 years later. Remarried Anne Buydens at 38, in what would be a lasting relationship, 2 more sons, with the youngest grabbing subsequent headlines with his drug-related antics. Had a long and successful Hollywood career, playing strong-armed leads and exuding muscular emotion in some 80 films, including The Vikings, Spartacus and Lust for Life, in which he proved a strong lookalike to artist Vincent Van Gogh (Francis Bacon). Formed 2 production companies, and won many awards, acting in concert with longtime friend Burt Lancaster. Broke the Hollywood blacklist, when he gave screen credit to writer Dalton Trumbo, for Spartacus in 1959. In 1991, he was given the American Film Institute’s Lifetime Achievement Award. In his mid-70s, he experienced a mid-air collision in which 2 companions died, resulting in the loss of 3 inches from his compressed spine, which reconnected him with his spiritual roots, feeling that God had spared him in order for him to do so. Became more involved in Israel, funding several children’s parks there, and underwent a 2nd bar mitzvah ceremony. Later suffered a stroke in 1996, and had to relearn to speak, fighting his way back to motor control, and making a return to the screen as a recovered stroke victim and former prizefighter in Diamonds. Began writing in his early 70s, and, in addition to 2 autobiographies, he has written 3 novels, among his 9 books. Still active as a nonagenarian, at 92, he did a one-man show in his own eponymous theater in L.A. Celebrated his 100th birthday in late 2016 in fine public fashion with family and friends. Has a net worth of $60 million. Inner: Intense, self-absorbed, self-acclaimed son-of-a-bitch, macho to the extreme, and yet with a unique gift of expression, both verbally and physically, with a strong will to prevail. Not-down-for-the-count lifetime of developing his gifts of self-expression on several levels from an unpromising base, before rediscovering his innate spirituality and ability at resurrection off the canvas at life’s near-end. Tom King (1835-1888) - English pugilist. Outer: Born on the seacoast, he became a sailor at an early age. Learned how to box in the Royal Navy, engaging in both bare-knuckled and gloved bouts. Served on a trading vessel afterwards, then became a foreman at the Victoria docks. Impressively beat up a dock bully, which brought him to the attention of boxer Jem Mace (Burt Lancaster), who coached him. Fought under the sobriquet of ‘The Young Sailor.’ 6’2”, 175 lbs, well-proportioned. Eventually met his teacher, Mace, for the English heavyweight crown in 1862. Although he outweighed the latter and dominated him for the first half of the bout, he lost to him in a 43 round fight in a knockdown blow to the throat. The 2nd time they met, he was exhausted by the 19th round, but landed a wild blow, and defeated Mace 2 rounds later. Immediately retired, but when the public clambered for a world championship bout between him and reigning champion John Heenan (Floyd Patterson), he returned to the ring and defeated him, claimed his championship and then retired for good. Became an accomplished oarsman, and a familiar figure around English racetracks, marrying the daughter of a shipowner. Amassed a huge fortune as a bookmaker and property owner, leaving an estate of $300,000, a considerable amount of money at the time. Died of bronchitis. Inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Hame in 1992. Inner: Known as ‘Ultimus Romanorum,’ a gladiator of the old school, who played to win. Two-fisted lifetime of conquest through channeling his competitive and exhibitionistic nature into the sporting-world, and doing quite handsomely by it in a life dedicated to the competitive surface of things. Dutch Sam (Samuel Elias) (1775-1816) - English boxer. Outer: Of Jewish descent. 5’6”, 135 lbs. Deep-chested and muscular. The possessor of incredible strength, and because of his relatively long arms, he was able to do successful pugilistic battle with those much large than himself. Began his ring career in 1801. Considered one of the hardest hitters of all time, and was always a crowd favorite because of his grit and the power of his iron fists. Considered the inventor of the uppercut. Father of fighter Young Dutch Sam (Burt Lancaster). Heavy drinking, however, curtailed his career, which lasted less than a decade. Returned to the ring 6 years later, but was defeated and died soon afterwards, with his alcoholism feeding into his early demise. Inner: Called the ‘man with the iron hand.’ Courageous,, but extremely self-destructive. Ironhand lifetime of using his skills to beat up on everybody, but most especially himself, necessitating a return to the ring in order to better integrate himself and his gifts, through creativity rather than wanton destruction.

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PATHWAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTIST AS OUTSIZED PERSONALITY:
Storyline: The self-destructive mischiefmaker searches for the integration of his complex interior through quirky performance and dramatic highs and lows, thanks to a longheld ability of getting off the canvas, even after taking a thorough shellacking.

Mickey Rourke (Philip Andre Rourke, Jr.) (1956) - American actor. Outer: Of Scotch-Irish-French descent. His grandfather and father both ran bars, and the latter was also the caretaker of a country club. His parents divorced when he was 7, and he reluctantly moved with his mother, brother and sister to Liberty City in Miami, where he grew up poor in a primarily black neighborhood. His mother remarried a Miami Beach cop, whom he claimed beat him regularly. Had four step-brothers and a step-sister added to his family by the union, and then one more half-sister. Extremely close to his brother Joey, who contracted cancer as a teen, and eventually succumbed to it in 2004. His father died of drink at 47, which permanently turned him off alcohol. Good athlete with baseball and boxing skills, but lacked the discipline to pursue sports, and spent much of his youth mischief-making. A couple of concussions ended his desire for a boxing career, which may have been a figment of his imagination. His step-father would later refute much of his tarnished childhood memories, as well. Got a part in a Univ. of Miami production of Jean Genet’s “Deathwatch,” then borrowed money from a sister and flew to NYC at 19, where he eventually studied stagecraft at the Actor’s Studio, and worked at odd jobs to support himself, including night manager of a massage parlor. 5’11”, well-tattooed and well-muscled, with dark brown hair and hazel eyes. Cast in a few off-off-Broadway productions but often quit during rehearsals because of disagreements with directors. Married dancer and actress Debra Feuer in 1981, divorced at decade’s end. Moved to Los Angeles, worked as a bouncer in a transvestite club and began getting small parts in films in his late 20s, starting with 1941. His quirky, original style began drawing notice, beginning as a bomb expert in Body Heat, and he soon began playing leads as anti-heroes reminiscent of his childhood idol, John Garfield (Mark Wahlberg). Several of his films bordered on the pornographic, most notably 9 1/2 Weeks, Wild Orchid and Angel Heart. In 1992, he married his costar from Wild Orchid, Carré Otis, then divorced her 2 years later after a violent, tempestuous union, which she saw her file, then drop spousal abuse charges against him. Fell in love with Chihuahuas during that time, which would become his emotional mainstay, while he continued to live well above his means, forcing him ultimately to compromise himself in film choices. Although his movies rarely did well, he developed a huge following in France, but also caused a controversy by donating part of one of his film’s fees to the Irish Republican Army, inspiring 2 members of the British Parliament to bar him from England and have his work banned there. In 1991, he announced he was leaving Hollywood and moved to Miami, where he tried a career as a professional fighter, boxing under the name of Marielito for several years. Won 10 of 12 with two draws, largely fighting kids fifteen years his junior, while getting his face pounded to a pulp. Had a posse of Cubano-Americanos, and maintained his image as a tough brawler. Hung with the underworld, and a decidedly anti-social set, feuded with producers and directors, abused himself via altered states, and got into public scrapes, while turning down plum roles until he finally hit the professional wall, and no one would hire him, thanks to his diffidence to everyone on his way up. As his life fell apart, he lost all his possessions, and returned to Los Angeles to assay a comeback, living simply with his beloved dogs in a $500 a month studio apartment, and trying to rebuild his career from a far more compliant base. Entered therapy, despite an initial resistance to it, and reclaimed himself, before resuscitating his career, in an up-off-the-canvas comeback that would have made his earlier incarnations proud. Gradually got bigger roles as he rehabilitated himself, culminating with The Wrestler in 2008, a rise’n’fall tale of redemption not unlike his own life, for which he won a Golden Globe for best dramatic actor, while putting on 35 pounds of muscle for the part. Returned to the ring at the age of 62 after a 20 year absence to fight a 29 year old former California Golden Glove champion in Russia, while praising Vladimir Putin as his kind of dictator. In a highly suspicious bout, he knocked out his opponent in two rounds with a couple of powderpuff blows, which left fans feeling they were watching not one, but two actors in the ring. It was later revealed his victim had fallen on hard times and was paid to make him look good. Inner: Pugnacious, difficult, outspoken, his own man. Violent, physical, self-involved but also large-hearted, with the capacity to both change and grow. Tendency to embellish the past, and re-edit his life accordding to his own sense of dramatics. Rebel without a pause lifetime of exploring his more self-destructive side, until it turned him inside out and forced him to reassess his needs and his abilities at manifesting his desires, an ongoing motif of his. John L. Sullivan (1858-1918) - American boxer. Outer: Paternal grandfather was a noted Celtic wrestler and champion performer with a shillelagh. Parents were Irish immigrants. His father was 5’3” and a pugnacious hod carrier, who often got into fights. Greatly resembled his mother, a kindly 180 lb. giantess. One of 3 children. Left school at 16 and worked as a plumber’s assistant, hod carrier and tinsmith. A good athlete, he received several offers to play professional baseball, but after viewing a boxing match, felt the sweet science was his fated calling, and began boxing in Boston theaters at 19 to pick up a few extra dollars. 5’10 1/2”, 195 lbs, at his peak, with a powerful build. Proved extremely adept in the ring, with a speedy and ferocious style, and a devastating knockout punch, although his strongest opponent was always himself, thanks to a huge appetite for alcohol, to the point where he drank bourbon out of beer steins, and often stayed drunk for days, showing himself to be a bellicose bully while in an inebriated state. Rose through the ranks quickly, including a victory over former champ Joe Goss (Mark Wahlberg), while gaining a huge following. In 1882, he fought Paddy Ryan (Jack Palance) for the heavyweight championship of America, and knocked him out in the 9th round. For the next decade he remained the undefeated champ. Often needed bodyguards to stop him from being trampled by the huge throngs of admirers who gathered wherever he alighted, whether in Europe or the U.S. The combination of his personality and imposing looks swiftly made him an American hero, and he became the prime archetype of the century for the professional fighter, as “The Great John L.” Toured the world afterwards with the offer of $50, then $1000 for anyone who could last 4 rounds with him. Refused, however, to deal with black fighters. In 1883, he married a chorus girl, and the duo had a son. Separated from her in 1885 and lived openly with a busty burlesque queen, Ann Livingston, although the following year his son died of diphtheria. After nearly fifty wins, with over half by knockout, he finally met his match in 1892 with “Gentleman” Jim Corbett (Walter Payton), who knocked him out in the 21st round, thanks largely to his disdain for training. Wasted his fortune, and toured the U.S. afterwards, giving exhibitions, appearing in melodramas, and playing the vaudeville circuit. Opened a bar in NY, and such was his fame, his name was mentioned for Congress. Finally divorced his wife in 1908, and married a childhood sweetheart, who was 45 at the time and made him give up his tippling ways, and he became a temperance lecturer. Retired to a farm in Massachusetts, and after his wife’s death in 1917, sank into poverty, while living with a former sparring partner, named George Bush. Eventually died of a heart attack. Inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1990. Inner: Hard-drinking and hard living, loved chasing fire engines and had a curious empathy for condemned men. Flashy dresser and animal lover, who loved to write his signature in the air at the end of all verbal challenges. Despite his faults, was always honest and straightforward. Barrel-chested lifetime of doing battle with both the bottle and opponents, while satisfying his need to be centerstage at all times, even when it ultimately meant denouncing his former evil ways. Dan Donnelly (1788-1820) - Irish boxer. Outer: Seventh of nine children of a carpenter who was often out of work because of breathing problems. Grew up in abject poverty, and started his working life as a carpenter in a timber yard. 5’11”, 196 lbs. Had his arm mangled in a fight with two sailors, while rescuing a young woman from their grasp, although it was saved by a surgeon. Earned a reputation for his fists, despite being reluctant to use them, and was declared Champion of the City of Dublin, after beating a fellow pugilist. His first recorded bout was in 1814 at the behest of Capt. William Kelly, a horse trainer, who was looking for someone to uphold the symbolic honor of Ireland against England, after the latter had so decimated the former politically. Fought Englishman Tom Hall in the bare knuckle style of the day, beating him when he refused to continue, to win the accolade of Irish Champion. Managed to squander his purse on a five day bender, a lifelong problem of his, which set up his next match against George Cooper, with the Englishman a heavy favorite. Although losing in its initial stages, his superior strength prevailed, and he knocked him out in eleven rounds, before returning to his riotous and extravagant ways. Had one more professional fight, winning in 34 rounds, and then descended into drink, gambling and chasing after Irish lassies, losing four pubs he owned in the process. Died penniless in the last tavern he operated, and was buried in one Dublin’s oldest cemeteries. His funeral was attended by thousands, with his gloves on a silken cushion, before graverobbers dug up his body to sell to a Dublin surgeon, who amputated his right arm to study its muscle structure. The rest of his was reburied, while his mummified arm went on permanent display afterwards in a variety of venues, after being immersed in a tank of alcohol and given a coat of varnish. Has remained a heroic figure in Irish legend ever since. Inner: Even-tempered, kindly, courageous and outgoing with an inherent capacity for being the stuff of legend. Bare knuckle lifetime of finding immortality in the ring, despite his ultimate brief span of years, leading him to pursue a similar pathway of triumph and dissipation, followed by redemption in his next equally legendary go-round in the ring.

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PATHWAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTIST AS ONGOING BAD BOY:
Storyline: The indelicate delinquent feels it necessary to establish his street cred before trying to assay himself as a workingclass hero on on the screen, in a double life run of proving himself to himself.

Mark Wahlberg (Mark Robert Michael Wahlberg0 (1971) - American actor, rapper, producer and restauranteur. Outer: Of Swedish and Irish descent on his paternal side, and Irish, British and French-Canadian on his maternal side. From a working-class Catholic background, mother was a nurse, father was a hard-drinking truck driver. Youngest of 9, and close to his mother. Ran wild in his youth in a downbeat racist Boston neighborhood, while his parents were too tired to supervise him, and they eventually divorced when he was 11. Always fascinated with films, he was a big John Garfield fan, and movies of that generation. Attended mostly black schools, and dropped out after the 8th grade to pursue a life of crime, robbing and beating people. Jailed for 45 days as a teen for an angel-dust inspired assault on a Vietnamese that took out the latter’s eye, which made him decide to turn his life around. 5’7”, with dark brown hair and hazel eyes, as well as muscular, with a tattoo of a rosary on his chest.. Capable of making his physique fluctuate within 40 pounds. His older brother, Donnie, became successful with the popular teen group, New Kids on the Block, and helped him form his own hip-hop band. Moved to Los Angeles and became a bland, but popular, white-boy rapper under the name Marky Mark, while buffing up in the gym, ultimately becoming a poster boy for Calvin Klein underwear. Showed a markedly marked insensitivity to both other races and homophiles in several of his public statements, while his career as a musician went swiftly downhill. Resurrected himself with a screen career, beginning in his early 20s with a small role in Renaissance Man, then gave good indication that he was far more of an actor than a musician with his next several films, including a star turn as an overhung porn star in Boogie Nights, while pursuing a nomadic lifestyle and professing difficulties in any intimacy that was not in front of a camera. Eventually settled in Los Angeles, proving himself an indefatigable worker, not only as an actor, but a producer as well with partner Steve Levinson, including the cable TV series, “the Entourage,” which ran from 2004 to 2011, limning the hanger-on lives around a young star, as well as “Boardwalk Empire” begun in 2010, depicting an Atlantic City politician’s shenanigans during the Prohibition Era. Has a daughter and two sons with girlfriend Rhea Durham, a former Victoria’s Secret model, whom he would finally marry in 2009, before adding another daughter to their brood several months later. The following year, he went full crypto-circle in The Fighter, connecting up with his hidden past two times over through it, while scoring mightily with the Transformer series as well as 2012’s Ted, the most successful R-rated comedy ever, so as to have three $100m grossing movies in a three year span. Willing to stretch himself as an actor, with 2014’s The Gambler, playing a dark literate character, operating at a far remove from his usual stoic action heroes. A restauranteur, as well, with his brothers, with Boston-based Wahlburger’s and Alma Nove, named after their mother. Boasted in 2012 if he had made his scheduled flight ten years earlier, he would have prevented part of 9/11 and changed his/story, then apologized for his braggadocio, making excuses galore for it. Remains equally busy as both producer and actor on both the large and small screen. Named 2017's highest-paid male actor earning $68 million Has a net worth of $225 million. Inner: Ambitious, willing to learn and change, driven. Extremely well-prepared for all his roles, knowing not only his lines, but everyone else’s as well. Soft-spoken and docile, with a genuine sense of repentance about his past. Repeat lifetime of playing the bad-boy in his youth, and then trying to rechannel his considerable need to perform by unconsciously aping his earlier existence in this series, as a scofflaw turned serious actor. John Garfield (Julius Garfinkle) (1913-1952 ) - American actor. Outer: Father was a poor Russian-Jewish immigrant pants presser in the garment industry. Older of 2 brothers. His mother died when he was 7, and he was boarded out to relatives for 3 years until his sire remarried. Ran wild in the streets as a youth in the tough Lower East Side of Manhattan. Sent to a school for problem children, and helped support his family by hawking newspapers, while getting into frequent gang brawls. Originally wanted to be a boxer. 5’7”. Taken under wing by an educator who saw something in him, and he went on to win a state debating contest. Got a scholarship, which he used to study at the Ouspenskaya Drama School, before coming under the wing of actress Eva Le Gallienne’s Civic Repertory Theatre. Married his high school sweetheart at 19, then hoboed around the country, and worked as a migrant farmhand. Claimed to have had a bit part in a film at 20, then returned to NYC and joined the Group Theater, while working as a Macy’s sales clerk. By his early 20s, he was playing leads on Broadway, and made his official film debut in his mid-20s in Four Daughters. His screen character in his subsequent films became a self-reflection: tough, defiant and angry. Turned down for military service during WW II for a heart condition, but founded the Hollywood Canteen for servicemen. Left his original studio, Warner Bros., in his early 30s to start his own production company, and also worked for other studios, making a number of memorable films, including The Postman Always Rings Twice and Body and Soul, a classic boxing film. Active in left-wing causes, although he never joined the Communist Party, also a hard partyer, addicted to both alcohol and women. He was rejected by the CP because they felt he couldn’t be trusted. Despite his popularity as a pugnacious but boyish rebel, he was called in front of the House un-American Activites Committee in his late 30s. Though accused of nothing specific, he was labeled a left-wing sympathizer and suddenly found himself out of favor with professional Hollywood. Did some Broadway plays, but film roles became fewer and fewer. Wrote out his confessions for Look magazine, ‘I Was A Sucker For A Left Hook,’ trying to clear his name, although it was never published. After 3 sleepless, anxiety-ridden days, he died of a heart attack in a woman friend’s bed. Inner: Tough on the outside, vulnerable within. Chose his roles carefully. Felt it was extremely important how others saw him, taking his own self-view from the perceptions of others, despite his pugnacious exterior. Reverse mirror lifetime of allowing himself to become undone by the very forces of authority he had postured against his whole reel and real life, while failing to integrate his inner and outer selves, despite considerable acclaim for his abilities. Joe Goss (1837-1885) - English/American boxer. Outer: Began his career in England around the age of 20, fighting at a weight of 140 lbs. Quick, crafty and durable as a fighter. In 1862, he won the middleweight championship of England, but lost the title the following year to Jem Mace (Burt Lancaster). In 1866, he fought him for the heavyweight championship of England, battling him to a draw the first time when Mace was accused of not trying. He was soundly outmatched the second time, taking a vicious shellacking. Went to America the following year, and save for one more exhibition with Mace in England, made the former country his home. Won the American heavyweight championship from Tom Allen in 1876 on a foul, after the latter struck him in the face when he was down. Fought an up-and-coming John L. Sullivan (Mickey Rourke) in an exhibition in 1880, then a little over a month later, lost his championship belt to Paddy Ryan (Jack Palance) in 87 rounds. Only gave exhibitions afterwards. Inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 2003. Inner: Bare knuckle lifetime of giving expression through his fists against much larger men, before taking on the world again from a similar perspective the next time around, to the same mixed results, in his ongoing self-testing of heart and courage.

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PATHWAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTIST AS PUGILISTIC POLITICIAN:
Storyline: The fancy footworker keeps parlaying a career centerstage as a highly physical public entertainer in order to entertain his own political ambitions, which never fully flower because of his own ultimate physical limitations.

George Murphy (1902-1992) - American actor and politician. Outer: Father was a noted track coach who prepared the US team for the 1912 Olympics. Youngest of 4. Good athlete, and a track star in high school. Ran away from home at 15 following his sire’s death to join the Navy, then returned to finish his education. Enrolled at Yale, but dropped out in his junior year to do plain labor, before being badly injured in a mining accident. 5’11”, 195 lbs. Decided not to return to school, and instead became a professional hoofer. Teamed up with his future wife, Juliette Henkel, and the duo became a popular tandem, ultimately making it to Broadway for several shows. Married her in 1926, two children from union. After his wife retired, he established himself on his own as a dancer and actor, and headed for Hollywood, where he appeared in Depression Era musicals and light romances, beginning with Kid Millions in 1934. Eventually did unmemorable drama, while getting involved in politics. Originally a Democrat, as he grew more successful, he switched to the Republicans in 1939. Became more deeply involved in industry affairs, serving twice as president of the Screen Actors Guild, as well as spending 15 years on their board of directors, while organizing entertainment personnel for the Armed Forces during WW II. In 1947, he became one of the founders of the Hollywood Republican Committee, as a staunch conservative. Given a special Oscar in 1950, he retired from the screen 2 years later, after some 45 films, and became a spokesman for MGM, before doing the same for other companies. Married a second time following his wife’s death. In 1953-54, he was chairman of the Republican National Convention, and a decade later he was elected to the U.S. Senate, defeating Pierre Salinger. Was noted for commenting Mexicans are good for stoop labor since they are built so close to the ground, while largely serving as a national, well-liked, joke. Proved to be a less-than-prepossessing legislator, and lost a bid for a second term, thanks in part to losing his larynx after a throat operation for cancer, so that he could only talk in a whisper. Retired to Florida and died of leukemia. Wrote his autobiography in 1970, Say - Didn’t You Use to be George Murphy. Inner: Well-tailored, easy-going and gracious. Liked hanging out with gangsters. Fast-stepping lifetime of rising well above his level of competence, in his ongoing pursuit of personal power and wealth through his physical and social, rather than mental abilities. John Morrissey (1831-1878) - Irish/American boxer and politician. Outer: Son of Irish immigrants, who emigrated to Canada, and then finding themselves destitute, came to America when he was 3. One of 8 children, and the only son. Grew up poor in Troy, NY, and only had one year of school before becoming a manual laborer, then a bartender. Didn’t learn to read or write until he was nearly 20. Had frequent run-ins with the police as the head of an Irish gang of young hooligans, and did jail time for assault and burglary. 6’, and powerful. Began his ring career inauspiciously, when he was badly beaten by a crowd, after his boss had set up a fight for him in NYC. Stayed there as an enforcer for Tammany Hall and as an immigrant runner to bilk the newly arrived. Picked up the sobriquet of “Old Smoke,” when a saloon fight he was in tipped over a coal stove. In 1851, he went to California as a stowaway to take advantage of the gold rush, and became an adept card cheat. Married Sarah Smith, the daughter of a ship captain under whom he had worked, their only child, a son, died young. Never a particularly good boxer, he, nevertheless, could take punishment. The following year, he challenged the California champion in his first professional match, and won on a forfeiture, after his supporters brandished weapons. Returning to NY, he took on Yankee Sullivan (Mickey Rourke), who thoroughly thrashed him, despite the latter being 41 at the time, although he won when onlookers stormed the ring, and the referee awarded the bout to him. Used his winnings to open a bar and gambling house. Afterwards, he returned to NY and the employ of Tammany Hall. Despite shooting two waiters, and being charged with three separate assaults with intent to kill, as well as the murder of a political foe, in a battle with a rival gang, he used his connections to escape prosecution. In 1858, he defeated John C. Heenan (Floyd Patterson), for the American heavyweight championship, thanks to the latter’s breaking his hand on a ring post, and then retired from the ring. Opened a gambling house and then a racetrack in Saratoga Springs, NY, amassing a sizable fortune for the time, while helping to make the latter a first-class resort. Although he and his wife tried to enter aristocrat society, they were deemed too lowlife. Lost part of his fortune in the stock market and testified against the legendarily corrupt Boss Tweed (Steve Wynn) of Tammany Hall, which helped dismember that political organization. Afterwards he went on to be elected to two terms in Congress, running just to annoy people, and two in the NY State Senate, but did not serve because of illness. Died of pneumonia. Over 15,000 people attended his funeral parade. inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1996. Inner: Flamboyant, belligerent and corrupt, but with the will to prevail and take punishment, as well as a talent for money and power. Two-fisted lifetime of making his presence known through the sheer dint of his will, before opting, the next time around, to storm similar bastions of politics and wealth from a considerably more genteel, albeit similarly physical base.

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PATHWAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTIST AS LIGHT-SEEKING HEAVY:
Storyline: The dualistic crypto-pugilist takes his gloves off to try to better the world, while publicly projecting a villainous menace that had little to do with his large private heart and need to right perceived social wrongs.

Robert Ryan (1909-1973) - American actor. Outer: Of Irish Catholic descent. Father was the son of Irish immigrants and a construction firm executive, mother was of English descent. Only child. Good athlete, began taking boxing lessons at the age of 8. Attended Chicago Loyola and graduated Dartmouth College, where he was the undefeated national intercollegiate heavyweight boxing champion. 6’4”, 190 lbs, virile and handsome. Did manual labor afterwards, as well as laboring as a male model, salesman and debt collector, before working his way out West to Hollywood, where he was involved in the Max Reinhardt Theatrical Workshop, and met his future wife and fellow student, Jessica Cadwalader. Made his stage debut in 1939 and married the same year, twin sons and a daughter from union. Close family, his wife became a children’s book writer. The following year he made his film debut in The Crooked Road, initially playing small parts, until boxing once again underscored his abilities in Golden Gloves. Came to Broadway in 1941 with “Clash By Knight,” before signing a contract with RKO. Enlisted in the Marines during WW II, then returned to Hollywood, garnering notice playing a bigoted villain in Crossfire in 1947 and reaching an early peak in 1949 in The Set-up, the tale of a washed-up boxer with integrity. Played a second role in the film version of Clash by Night, and went on to fashion a memorable career as both hero and villain, bringing a hard-edged intensity to all he assayed, with his most memorable portrayals in the latter classification. Always approached his work with an undercurrent of high quality, so that he often transcended his material. Continued his stage performances as well, tackling Shakespeare, as well as classic contemporary drama. Very active in liberal social causes with the ACLU and SANE and also a proponent of education. Founded the the UCLA Theater Group and a sectarian private school. Died of cancer the year after his wife succumbed to the same disease. Inner: Modest and low-keyed, despite the intensity and cruelty he projected. Harbored a very strong sense of social justice. Chose his roles with an eye towards their challenges, rather than easy box office successes, and was equally at home on the stage as in front of the camera. Liberal and liberating lifetime of putting his darkness in his film work and his light in his private life, to make for a true warrior intent on leaving the world and himself a far better place and person than the one he initially found. Joe Coburn (1835-1890) Irish/American boxer. Outer: 5’9”. Began his boxing career as a middleweight, and gradually put on the heft to fight as a heavyweight at 190 lbs. Quick-handed, crafty and agile, with good footwork, he used his brain as well as his brawn to rise to championship caliber. Came to America, and in 1856, he won the bare-knuckle middleweight championship of the country. In 1862, he challenged John Heenan (Floyd Patterson) for the heavyweight championship of America, and when Heenan refused to fight him, he claimed the belt for himself. The following year, he defeated Mike McCoole (Shaquille O’Neal), to solidify his hold on the title, and then challenged the English champion, Tom King (Kirk Douglas), but the latter announced his retirement. When Jem Mace (Burt Lancaster), the latter’s successor, refused to come to America, he went to Ireland to set up a match, but it was postponed twice, and he retired in 1865. Returned to the ring in 1868, but police prevented a rematch with both McCoole, and in 1871, with Mace. Later that year, he finally fought Mace in Louisiana, but the latter injured his hand in the fifth round. In 1877, he was sentenced to 10 years in prison for a felonious assault on a police officer with intent to kill. After serving 5 years, he was released, and spent the rest of his professional life fighting exhibitions, including two with the up-and-coming John L. Sullivan (Mickey Rourke), despite his relatively advanced age. Inner: Intelligent and crafty, but with a strong temper. Brawling lifetime of successfully slugging it out with the best of his time, only to let his temper ultimately undo him, necessitating a more creative channeling of his strength - mental, physical and social - in order to enhance life rather than destroy it.

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PATHWAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTIST AS GUSTO-FILLED GLADIATOR:
Storyline: The uninhibited exhibitionist exhausts all with his relentless lust for life, while living everything to such full extent, he winds up totally self-abzorba-ed.

Anthony Quinn (Anthony Rudolph Oaxaca Quinn) (1951-2001) - Mexican/American actor. Outer: Father was of Mexican/Irish descent, mother was of Mexican and Aztec heritage. Both fought with Pancho Villa in the Mexican Revolution. His sire fled for his life back across the border to evade the opposing federales, and his mother soon followed with her infant son. His parents wound up picking fruit up and down the California coast, and he joined them at the age 4, earning 10 cents an hour. Moved to E. Los Angeles when he was 6, where his father worked as a property man at Selig Studios. Grew up feeling unaccepted by either of his heritages, and decided early on to become a world citizen. His progenitor died in an auto accident when he was 9. Suffered a speech impediment, but was determined to make something grand of himself. Never graduated high school, instead taught himself to appreciate the arts, and then tried to master them. Had a stint as a professional boxer, winning his first 16 fights, but after getting knocked out in the 17th round, he decided he didn’t have the killer instinct for the ring. 6’2” with dark brown hair and eyes. Met architect Frank Lloyd Wright who suggested he get an operation to correct his deficiency, then take acting lessons to improve his speech, which proved prophetic, and the two remained friends for the latter’s life. While learning to act, he took up the saxophone and formed a small orchestra, eventually playing with the notorious evangelical, Aimee Semple McPherson’s (Marjoe Gortner) Angelus Temple band, as well as occasionally preaching, and briefly studying for the priesthood. Made his stage debut in 1936 in a Mae West play, “Clean Beds,” and the same year fashioned his film debut in a bit part in Paroled. After convincing director Cecil B. DeMille (Michael Bay) that he spoke Cheyenne, he serially won a part and then the latter’s adopted daughter, Katherine DeMille, marrying her in 1937, before being shocked to find out she wasn’t a virgin. 3 sons and two daughters from the union, with their first-born son drowning in a lily pond as a toddler.Relentlessly unfaithful all during his marriage with numerous big name stars, including the mother-daughter tandem of Ingrid Bergman and Pia Lindstrom. Took a radical political stand in 1942 by raising funds for the Mexican/Americans convicted in the Zoot Suit riots, while always trying to portray Mexicans sympathetically on screen. Worked steadily although not spectacularly throughout the 1940s, including several stage stints, but it was not until 1952, with Viva Zapata, that he became a recognized star, winning an Academy Reward for best supporting actor, which he dittoed in 1956 with Lust For Life. Saw the world as his stage, and did memorable work in Europe, as well as Hollywood, over the next stretch, including Requiem for a Heavyweight, about a proud but battered fighter, which he felt was his best work to date. It would be one role in particular, however, that he would come to both identify with and be identified with, Zorba the Greek, in 1964. Fathered several children by a wardrobe assistant, Iolanda Addolori, and publicly acknowledged it, at which point his wife divorced him in 1965. Married Addolori, while their third child together was on the way, and spent most of the next 3 decades living in Italy, while he continued his seed-spreading ways into his 80s, racking up some 13 children all told by a host of women of different nationalities. In 1982, he reprised Zorba on stage to great success and finally came to grips with his son’s death, thanks to a similar demand on Zorba in the play. As his career wound down, he turned to art in what he called Mexican abstraction, getting exhibitions around the world, largely on the strength of his name, rather than his work. Ultimately made some 130 films, although the latter part of his career, he was accused of playing Zorba over and over. In the early 1990s, he conceived his last child with his secretary, Kathy Devin, who was half a century his junior, and after much disgruntled delay, his wife divorced him in 1993 so that he could marry a third and final time, and the duo had a second child in 1996. Wrote his autobiography, The Original Sin, in 1972, and followed it up with a second volume, “One Man Tango,” in 1995. Died of respiratory failure. Inner: Lusty, rugged and passionate. Self described as “born with very little talent but great drive.” Virile, traditionally male, with a strong sense of responsibility around his seed-spreading sensibilities. Self-abzorbed lifetime of trying to be master of all he touched, through the sheer dint of his lusty larger-than-life personality. Ned O’Baldwin (1840-1875) - IIrish boxer. Outer: Known as “the Irish Giant.” 6’5”, 210 lbs. Details of his life are largely ill-recorded. Well-regarded by connoisseurs of the ring for his great strength, he ultimately became the Irish champion. Set up a fight with the English crownholder, Jem Mace (Burt Lancaster), but the two couldn’t agree on a referee, and the bout was canceled. Came to America in 1867, and was arrested during a bout in Massachussets. Went on to serve two years in the Mass. State Prison. Following an altercation when he knocked out a fellow pugilist’s eye with a cane, he was sent to prison again. When he got out, he came to NYC and opened a liquor saloon with a partner, Michael Finnell. Proved to be the place’s sole attraction, and when he wanted out of the partnership a month later, Finnell shot him twice and killed him. Inner: Violent lifetime of dissipating his talents and coming to a bad end, before resurrecting full-blown as a larger-than-life star able to use the entire world as his canvas, rather than a small rectangular ring.

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PATHWAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTIST AS TAUT-FACED TRICKSTER:
Storyline: The deceptive recapitator rises from the economic depths, then crash lands in order to mine the unusual visage dealt him by the fates, as well as the hidden expressive talents beneath his imposing, menacing presence.

Jack Palance (Volodoymir Palahnuik) (1919-2006) - American actor, poet and painter. Outer: Of Ukranian descent. Father was a coal miner. 3rd of 5 children. Hated the company town he grew up in, feeling it was a form of slavery, although worked briefly in the mines himself. Nevertheless, he maintained a strong affection for Pennsylvania his entire life. 6’3”, 200 lbs. with dark brown hair and hazel eyes A football star in high school, he attended the Univ. of North Carolina on a scholarship for saidsame, but broke his nose and collarbone before quitting in disgust at the commercialization of a so-called amateur sport. Boxing since he was 14, he turned professional, and started well, 12-2, but after 2 years in the ring, saw he was going nowhere and enlisted in the Air Force. After his B-17 crashed in England during WW II, he underwent plastic surgery, which gave him his unusual high-cheekboned facial structure. Following the war, he changed his name to Palance, and went to Stanford where he got a BA in drama. Did a variety of menial jobs, as well as being a photographer’s model. Accidentally broke fellow Method actor Marlon Brando’s nose, when he missed a punching bag the latter set up for him, while he was understudying him in “Streetcar Named Desire.” Won a film contract after stepping in for him. Later slugged an unsuspecting Burt Lancaster on a set in a fight scene, and the latter promptly belted him back, in an unconscious reprisal of their 19th century roles. Married actress and producer Virginia Baker in 1949, a son and two daughters from the union, Cody, who died in 1998, Brooke and Holly, all of whom, became actors. Divorced in 1966, and later married and divorced a 2nd time. Fashioned his film debut in 1950 in Panic in the Streets, and indelibly made his public mark 3 years later, playing the sinister villain in Shane, before going on to a long film career, despite a decidedly mixed slate of vehicles, including a goodly number of best-forgotten foreign films. Initially typecast as a heavy, he later showed a far more sympathetic emotional side, so that his oeuvre wound up extremely varied, with some striking performances. Won an Emmy in 1956 for Best Actor as a prizefighter in “Requiem for a Heavyweight.” In 1992, while accepting a Best Supporting actor nod for his role as a wheezing cowboy in City Slickers, he proceeded to do one-handed push-ups, to display his fitness at his relatively advanced age. Appeared in 100 films or so, as well as numerous specials and movies for TV. A dedicated westerner, he owned a thousand acre cattle ranch, which he bought in the mid-1960s, Land of the Big Acorns, in the Tehachapi Mountains in California, and, in addition to his thespian skills, was an active poet and painter of abstract landscapes. Died at the home of his daughter of natural causes. Inner: Largely private, never watched his own movies. Linguistically gifted, with the ability to speak 6 languages. Quoted as saying, “The only two things you can truly depend on are gravity and greed.” Reconstructed lifetime of literally rising from the underworld to tap into his higher creative skills, after being physically rearranged by fate, so as to have a far more memorable creative career, than his original physicality warranted. Paddy Ryan (1851-1900) - Irish/American boxer and wrestler. Outer: Came to America and eventually settled in Troy, NY. A handsome six footer, he weighed between 195 and 200 lbs., which was a huge size for the boxers of the day. Dubbed ‘the Trojan Giant.’ The possessor of great strength, he was a better wrestler than boxer, and was never properly trained, although managed to hold his own with most of the better fighters of his day, thanks to his rigorous experience in barroom brawls, as well as his underhanded methods. Won the American title from Joe Goss (Mark Wahlberg) in 1880, in an 86 rounder, which turned out to be his first professional bout. Fought exhibitions afterwards, and continued his barroom brawling. Two years later, he lost the title to the legendary John L. Sullivan (Mickey Rourke) by a knock-out, and after suffering a second knockout by him in 1886, he began refereeing, as well giving exhibitions. Engaged Sullivan another 10 times, before finally retiring shortly before his death. Inner: Barroom brawler lifetime of rising to the top on the sheer strength of his strength, despite limited technique, before returning to explore the less pugnacious and more creative side of himself, as part of a hidden large group of mostly Irish fighters from the 19th century, who went on to celluloid careers in the 20th, for the precise same reason.

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PATHWAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTIST AS MAN’S MAN:
Storyline: The macho ex-marine meets his match in symbolic manner through his rebellious female side, when courtship leads to court, and forces him to deal with his hidden other half.

Lee Marvin (1924-1987) - American actor. Outer: Of British descent with some Irish and Scottish.Father was an advertising executive, mother was a fashion writer. His parents were constantly traveling, and he wound up being kicked out of a dozen prep schools by the time he was 16. Felt his life was too soft and enlisted in the Marines during WW II, where he was a sniper, but was wounded during the battle of Saipan and discharged, spending 13 months in a hospital, after being shot in the buttocks, which severed his sciatic nerve. 6’2 1/2”, 185 lbs., with blue eyes and prematurely white hair. Without having a sense of direction, he worked briefly as a plumber’s assistant, then was asked to replace someone in a bit part in summer stock. Enjoyed the experience, and studied acting at NY’s American Theater Wing. Married Betty Ebeling at 18, three daughters and a son from the union, which ended in divorce 13 years later. Worked off Broadway, then got a part on Broadway in his mid-20s, while simultaneously making his screen debut in You’re in the Navy Now. Deep-voiced and rugged, he began his career playing villains and heavies in macho westerns and crime dramas, often doing his own stunt work. In his mid-30s, he starred as a no-nonsense good-guy cop in “M Squad,” for 3 seasons, which transformed him into a hero, and brought him some lighter roles in several John Wayne films. Married Pamela Feeley in his mid-40s, later separated but never divorced. Received an Emmy in 1961 for a TV movie, “People Need People.” In 1965, he won the Best Actor Oscar for his comic dual turn in Cat Ballou, as a drunken hero and his noseless fiend of a brother, and became a star in his own right, with his trademark white hair and thick-lipped masculinity. A successful string of adventure films followed, but he garnered greater publicity when his live-in mate of six years, Michelle Triola, sued him in 1979 for ‘palimony’ for the money he made during their relationship, despite its non-binding nature. Although her claim was ultimately rejected, and he was forced to pay only a nominal sum, it began a whole other industry for divorce lawyers across the country, spawning a number of similar celebrity cases. His career slowed down afterwards, and he eventually died of a heart attack. Buried in Arlington National Cemetery. Inner: Candid and down-to-earth. Extremely masculine, projecting a rugged virility, which made him a natural for adventure films. Enthusiastic deep-sea fisherman. His unintegrated female side would be his most enduring legacy, however, in the precedent-setting palimony suit he triggered. Gender bender lifetime of ultimately being forced to face the strength of his hidden female side, which eventually sapped him, and made his heart vulnerable to its own incompleteness. Bob Fitzsimmons (1863-1917) - English/American boxer and actor. Outer: Father was a blacksmith, and both his parents were extremely religious. Moved with his family to New Zealand when he was 9. A good athlete in school, he went to work as a carriage painter and in a foundry, laboring as a blacksmith. Although the possessor of relatively spindly legs, he had a powerful upper body, enabling him to fight men much heavier than himself, while sportswriters labeled him a cannonball on a pair of pipestems. Entered an amateur boxing tourney sponsored by visiting champion Jem Mace (Burt Lancaster), and despite weighing only 140 pounds, he knocked out 4 larger men to win the contest’s heavyweight division. The following year, he prevailed again, and turned professional. In 1883, he moved to Australia to begin his ring career in earnest, and after a successful 7 years there, came to America in 1890, and won the middleweight championship, knocking out Jack “Nonpareil” Dempsey (Jack Sharkey). Although unprepossessing in looks, with a small balding head of thinning red hair, a freckled face, and little real style, he was one of hardest hitters of his time. Moved up to the heavyweight division, and in 1897, fought the champion, James Corbett (Walter Payton), knocking him out in the 14th round. Held the crown for 2 years, during which time he toured the country with a theatrical show, before losing to James J. Jeffries (Vin Diesel), breaking both of his hands in the process. At the age of 40, he won the light heavyweight crown, becoming the first in boxing annals to hold three titles during his life. Although he soon lost the chanpionship, he continued fighting for another 9 years, losing to Jack Johnson (Magic Johnson), in one of his last fights. Had 115 bouts all told, winning 74 of them, 67 by knockout with 30 no-decisions in a 27 year career. Married four times. His first wife’s name was unknown, one son from the union. In 1894, he wed Rose Julian, an acrobat who died in 1904. The following year he married Julia Gifford, a singer who was touring with him in a play called, “A Fight For Love.” She left him for another man, and in 1915, he married Temo Ziller, an Italian. Joined the vaudeville circuit after his ring career was over, and then became an evangelist, before dying in the influenza epidemic of WW I. His wife was later denied permission to exhume him in order to extract the diamonds he had in his teeth. Inner: Easy-going, good-natured, sentimental and a soft touch for one and all. Had a high falsetto singing voice. Deceptive lifetime of successfully taking on those much larger than himself, before discovering a second calling as an entertainer, which he would explore far more deeply in his next go-round in this series.

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PATHWAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTIST AS CHARISMATIC KILLER:
Storyline: The wrathful athlete cannot contain his need for dominance, will and control, when it comes to women in his life, and winds up playing out the same murderous drama twice in a row, in his inability to express or appreciate the feminine in his overly masculine world.

O. J. Simpson (Orenthal James Simpson) (1947) -American athlete and actor. Outer: Of African-American descent. Mother worked as a hospital orderly, while his father deserted the family when he was 4. 3rd of 4 children. Grew up in a low-income housing project in San Francisco, and ran wild in the streets, proving himself a leader both in neighborhood skirmishes and on the gridiron. 6’ strongly-built. An all-city fullback, he didn’t have the grades to qualify for a major college, so he went to junior college instead, where he set a record of 54 touchdowns in his two seasons. Won a scholarship to the Univ. of Southern California, and was an immediate star there, as a two time All-American, known as “O.J.” or “the Juice.” Had a spectacular career as a halfback, winning the Heisman trophy, the symbol of singular college pre-eminence, by the largest margin in the his/story of the award, while setting the NCAA record for most yards gained in a single season up until that time. Claimed by professional football’s worst team, the Buffalo Bills, he had an equally dazzling ten year career, setting more records, including being the first player to gain 2000 yards in a single season, before winding up back in San Francisco at his career’s tail end. Called by many one of the game’s true greats, and extremely popular with the fans, thanks to his handsome looks, and pleasing public personality. In 1967, he wed his high school sweetheart, Marguerite Whitley, 3 children from union. They were divorced a dozen years later after his oldest son drowned in their swimming pool. In 1975, he began dashing through airports and leaping over luggage in Hertz rent-a-car ads, which led to a minor film career, most notably in the three Naked Gun comedies, but he also played a man framed for murder by the police in The Klansman. Became a broadcaster in 1983 on Monday Night Football, and then switched to college games, before ultimately becoming a sideline reporter, thanks, in some part, to his difficulty in being understood by a majority of the listening audience. Elected to the football Hall of Fame in 1985, and the same year married Nicole Brown, a golden blonde and former waitress he had met when she was 17 in 1977. The duo lived a lavish life-style and had two children, although his abusive ways eventually led to a divorce in 1992, because of his over-the-top jealousy over her. In 1989, he beat her so badly she needed hospital treatment, after 8 earlier police calls to their house. Got off with a fine and community service, thanks to an ongoing admiration of him by the LAPD. Unable to countenance their separation, he began stalking her, and on the night of June 12, 1994, she and a waiter-friend, Ronald Goldman, were savagely stabbed to death in front of her house. About to be arrested several days later, he led police on a slow motion freeway chase in a Ford Bronco threatening suicide, before voluntarily surrendering, claiming he was hitting golf balls at the time of the murder, before catching a flight for Chicago. The subsequent trial was a national sensation, riveting a huge audience to their TV sets all throughout, as the concept of DNA evidence was introduced to the mass audience, and the science of forensics was given its public birth. Although the prosecution had all sorts of evidence linking him to the scene, a team of accomplished lawyers, led by Johnny Cochran, got him off with an acquittal, after the jury deliberated for only 4 hours, much to the shock of the families of the victims. The entire circus lasted 9 months, and cost the tax payers some $8 million, while 150,000,000 watched the final verdict. He became a pariah, afterwards, with only his tight support network still around him, as the public largely turned on him. A subsequent civil trial for wrongful death, the following year, found him guilty, when incontrovertible footprint evidence tripped him up, despite personally testifying, when he hadn’t at his first trial. Although fined $33.5 million and told to turn over his assets, he hedged on complying, and his estate was auctioned off and demolished. Moved to Florida, while doing battle over custody, and tried disappearing from the spotlight, although he would continue to occasionally make the news. Settled into golfing and searching for “the real killers,” to become a joke of sorts, but also a beacon for national campaigns against domestic abuse. Involved with several Nicole Brown lookalikes, in his ongoing desire to negate his actions, since the person he is lackadaisically searching for has always been himself. A chronic drug abuser, he suffered an overdose in 2003, and 2 years later, he was found guilty of owning a scramblebox to get satellite TV for free, and was fined. As a coda to his outrageous career, he ghost/penned “If I Did It: How It Would Have Happened,” an exploitative tome, accompanied by a TV special to grab one final moment in the limelight, while inadvertantly offering a confession to his misdeeds, only to see the whole project canned, thanks to public outrage, and his $1 million + advance contested by the Goldman family, which caused him to be barred from spending any of it. On the day “If I Did It” finally came out, he was arrested as part of an armed robbery of a memorabilia dealer whom he claimed had his possessions. His book immediately jumped to number one on the bestseller lists, while he returned to media fascination status, only to have several of his cohorts turn on him, forcing him to stand trial, with the very real possibility of spending the rest of his life in prison. Took a giant step in that direction by violating parole and losing his get out of jail card free, before paying double his previous bail, to briefly regain his freedom. An all-white jury subsequently found him guilty on all 12 counts, on the 13th anniversary of his previous acquittal, after deliberating 13 hours. At his sentencing he pled for leniency in a rambling manner in what would probably be his valedictory public performance. Afterwards, he received a confusing sentence which allowed him to apply for a new trial in 2013 and receive partial forgiveness for some of the charges,although he still had to serve another four years on the others at Nevada’s Lovelock Correctional Facility. Ballooned well past 300 pounds in custody, while forced to use a cane to get around, as he continues to deteriorate physically in reflection of whatever hidden guilt he may feel over past actions. Granted parole in 2017, after serving nine years, although his desire to live in Florida with his children was blocked by that state’ AG. His net worth has fluctuated wildly, although he receives a pension from the NFL of several hundred thousand a year. Inner: Outwardly affable, inwardly violent, with a dual view of men and women, appealing to the former, while proving uncontrollable with the latter. Probably stayed alive and out-of-jail for the sake of his children, despite once again killing the love of his life. Once they were grown, he engineered the elements that would permanently incarcerate him for what he had earlier done. Juiced-up lifetime of letting the real McCoy of his murderous emotions override his sense of possession and entitlement, to once again kill himself through another, and then divorce himself from the reality of what he had done. Kid McCoy (Norman Shelby) (1873-1940) - American boxer. Outer: Of Irish descent. Began fighting as a teenager, and picked up the nickname ‘Kid,’ to which he added Charles McCoy. Became a popular barnstorming boxer, fighting around the world, during which time he came up with the corkscrew punch, which was delivered by rotating his wrists, and proved highly punishing when it landed on the face of his opponents. A tricky and unpredictable fighter, he won the welterweight title in 1896, and the following year was given the middleweight belt through a disqualification. Often fought heavyweights to good advantage, while also using the psychology of feigning illness or neglected training to lull his adversaries into thinking they were going to get an easy fight, only to surprise them with a whaling. The phrase, “the real McCoy,” came into usage over reporters speculating whether a weather-beaten fighter or the real McCoy would show up for his later bouts. Always generous with his money for anyone with a hard luck story, he also loved the sauce, and the multiple state of matrimony, marrying around 9 times. Retired temporarily from the ring at 24 and with a quarter million dollars in his pocket, opened a New York cabaret, where he rubbed and bent elbows with the city’s sports and entertainment powerhouses. Came out of retirement twice, but both times lost challenges in the higher weights in championship bouts. Had a 25 year career and fought over 100 bouts, winning 86 of them. By 1924, he had lost his fortune, thanks to all his divorce settlements, his frequent month-long benders and his high living, and was a flabby shell of what he had once been. Came out to Los Angeles, and got bit parts in movies, as well as a job as security guard in an aircraft factory. Obtained a gun, and began carrying it around with him everywhere. Took up with Theresa Mors (Nicole Brown), the wife of a wealthy and nasty antiques dealer, and the latter moved in with him into his apartment, planning to divorce her husband and marry him, while he saw her as the love of his life. The cuckolded husband began using his considerable resources to harass the two, and Theresa wavered on the divorce, when her friends convinced her that her inamorata was only interested in the $125,000 settlement. On the night of Aug. 13th, 1924, he wrote out his will, leaving everything, $300, to his mother, then drunkenly stabbed Theresa in the breast, before fatally shooting her in the back of the left side of her head. He then ran out in search of her husband in a crazed state. Stopping to confess to his sister, he came into Mors’s store, and commandeered the customers, before going on a mid-morning rampage, shooting at several people and then fleeing, until he was finally tackled by a policeman. Confessed, but when he sobered up, he claimed his wife had committed suicide. Subsequently tried and convicted of manslaughter, rather than murder, as well as three assault charges from his random shooting, thanks to the efforts of his superlawyer, Jerry Giesler, at the very beginning of his own high-profile career. His mother died during the trial, and he wound up doing 8 years at San Quentin, where he was a model prisoner, even saving a pilot from a fiery crash, when he was working on a road-gang nearby. Senators and celebrities petitioned for his release, and Henry Ford, himself, offered to have him teach physical conditioning to his workers. Released in 1932, he married for a tenth time, and fell totally out of the limelight, which deeply depressed him, so that he ultimately overdosed on sleeping pills. Inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1991. Inner: Affable, and generous with men, but probably highly abusive with women, as evidenced by his desperate need to be married, and his spouses’ equal desire to soon shed him. Well-liked and extremely self-destructive, a man completely out-of-touch with his female side. Little seemed to have been learned, since he needed to repeat the horrendous experience all over again. Self-deceptive lifetime of allowing his dark need to control women to totally enshroud him, despite a goodheartedness to his own gender, that did not translate at all towards the opposite sex.

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PATHWAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTIST AS AS MUSCLEMAN & MUSCLE-HEAD:
Storyline: The sinewy sideshow attraction tries to win acclaim for his cinematic physical presence, but only manages to mirror his one-sided love affair with himself in the limitations imposed upon him by his undemanding fans, after earlier being an object of universal affection for his pure fighting skills.

Jean-Claude Van Damme (Jean-Claude Van Varenberg) (1960) - Belgian actor and athlete. Outer: Of Belgian as well as Flemish descent, with a Jewish paternal grandmother. Father was a florist and accountant. One sister. Grew up speaking French, although he was a twiggy little boy with glasses and no self-confidence. At 10, he enrolled in a karate class to toughen up. After weightlifting and ballet, he reshaped his body into an impressive muscular mass. 5’10”, with light brown hair and hazel eyes as well as small hands and feet, which make him look larger. Won some minor bodybuilding and kickboxing titles and dropped out of school at 16. Opened a sports club in Brussels, and began to have movie star fantasies. In 1980, he married Maria Rodriguez and within a year divorced, setting a pattern of brief marriages due to his total self-involvement. Sold his gym in 1981 and moved to Los Angles the following year with $8000 and a smattering of English. Changed his name to the more marquee-worthy Van Damme, after a friend of his and worked at odd jobs. Saw the city as a huge gym which perfectly reflected his own obsession with physicality. Married a 2nd time to Cynthia Derderian in 1985 and once again soon divorced. The same year he made his film debut in No Retreat, No Surrender. Launched a surprise kick over the head of producer Menahem Golan, and won a turning point role in Bloodsport, which was a huge hit in Malaysia and France, despite Golan’s view of it as an abomination. Deluged with scripts afterwards as a formulaic martial arts star, but unable to transcend the action genre, due to his French accent and extremely limited acting style, which would make each of his films a virtual clone of its predecessor, to the point of playing 2 different versions of himself in 3 different films. Developed a hefty cocaine habit, and married Gladys Portugues, a bodybuilder in 1986, one daughter from the union, divorced 6 years later. His 4th marriage was to Darcy LaPier, a model in 1994, with whom he had a series of breakups and reconciliations, one son from the union. After she accused him of spousal abuse and cocaine and sleeping pill addiction, he admitted to the last 2 charges, but denied the first, going public with his problems in 1998, including untreated manic-depression. Later reconciled with his 3rd wife, remarried her, and got back in shape, determined to resurrect his career, which hit a dead end, after his 1992 hit, Universal Soldier. From 1998 onward, he joined the straight-to-video brigade, with none of his films being deemed worthy of theatrical release, while lamenting publicly and wondering aloud over his failure to be taken seriously as actor, to little fan affect, although after the turn of the century, he was able to infuse more emotion and more of himself in his fare. Scored a critical triumph in 2009 with JCVD, playing himself in a Belgium post-office heist fantasy, in which he delivered a mea culpa monologue detailing his personal failings. More forgettable fare would follow, in his continual need to be in the public eye. Inner: Competitive, intense, extremely self-involved, with a highly addictive personality. Muscle-bound lifetime of refashioning himself on the outside, but unable to do so on the inside, leading to a stalemate in his ultimate objectives as well as in his intimate relationships. Marcel Cerdan (1916-1949) - Algerian boxer. Outer: One of three boxing brothers. Began fighting professionally as a welterweight in his late teens in Morocco, winning his first 47 fights in a row, before losing on a disqualification in 1939 to an English fighter. Won the European welterweight title 5 fights later, and put together two more impressive winning streaks.Married teen-age Marinette Lopez in 1943, 3 children from the union, including boxer Marcel Cerdan, Jr. Joined the American allies in the latter part of WW II, but saved his fighting for the ring, winning the Inter-Allied Championship, while moving up in weight class to become a middleweight. After winning and losing and regaining the European title, he finally got a shot at a world title, and in 1948, he came to America and won the middleweight championship from Tony Zale, but the following year, he lost it on a KO to Jake LaMotta, the only time he was ever knocked out in his career. As one of the pre-eminent sports personalities of his day, he hooked up with French singer Edith Piaf (Erykah Badu), to become the country’s favorite celebrity couple of the post-WW II era, despite still being officially married. Ultimately won 119 fights, with 61 by knockouts, and lost only 4, 2 by disqualification. Died in a plane crash over the Azores, en route to a return match with LaMotta. In a posthumous movie made of his life, Edith and Marcel, his son Marcel Cerdan, Jr. played him. Inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1991. Inner: Great courage, stamina and punching flair. Championship lifetime of sheer adulation for his singular skills in the ring, which he would fail to transpose onto the larger emotional demands of the silver screen.

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PATHWAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTIST AS MULTI-FACIAL MAN OF ACTION:
Storyline: The former great white hope deliberately fudges his racial identity, while unconsciously reclaiming elements of his name, in order to open himself up to the innate creativity that lay behind his former fast and furious fists of steel.

Vin Diesel (Mark Vincent) (1967) - American actor/producer. Outer: Never knew his biological father. Stepfather was an African-American actor, drama teacher and theater manager, mother was an astrologer. One of a pair of nonidentical twins, brother Paul became a film editor. Also had a younger brother and sister. Raised in Greenwich Village, in government funded housing for artists, and got caught trespassing in a local theater as a youngster. As punishment, the woman who worked there made him take acting workshops, after which he began performing in plays for the theater, beginning at the age of 7. Always felt like a misfit, and saw acting as a way of claiming himself. Did break-dancing on the street for spare change and lifted weights, ultimately putting 220 lbs on his 6’1” frame. Went to Hunter College, where he majored in English, with the thought of becoming a screenwriter. Worked for 9 years as a bouncer at a NYC nightclub, where he adopted his nom de theatre, and also did telemarketing, before moving to Hollywood at 24. Made his filmic debut in 1995 in a short he produced, wrote, directed and starred in, Multi-Facial, which explored being multi-racial in today’s society. That role led to a part which was created especially for him, in a Steven Spielberg film, Saving Private Ryan in 1998. A highly physical, charismatic performer, he leapt to stardom after the turn of the century in the street racing film, The Fast and the Furious, followed by XXX, which he executive produced. His successes as an action star led to his own production company, One Race Productions, and his elevation to in demand status, and by 2005, a $20 million salary. Also formed Tigon Studios, a video game company, to take advantage of his popular Riddick character, which he has portrayed in two films. Deliberately evasive about his racial identity, in an unconscious nod to his earlier uncomfortable elevation as the Great White Hope.In 2008, he had a daughter with girlfriend Paloma Jiminez, then added a son and second daughter by her to his familial entourage. Gave a highly emotional speech about the late Paul Walker at a screening of The Fast and the Furious 7, in 2015, then named his new daughter Paul as a tribe to his close friend. Helped take 2017’s The Fast and the Furious, #8 into the economic stratosphere with a global record box office opening of over a half billion dollars. Has a net worth of $160 millionInner: Sees acting as a means of establishing identity, a central theme of his. Transformational lifetime of coming into a theatrical, offbeat family to tap into his innate creativity, while using his large body to good filmic advantage, as yet another crypto-pugilist raising his game to the next level. James J. Jeffries (1875-1953) - American boxer. Outer: Of Norman descent. Father was a farmer and minister. One of 8 children. When he was 6, his family moved to Los Angeles. Enjoyed boxing and wrestling as a youth, but at the request of his parents, put off becoming a professional, and instead became an ironworker, where he learned the fine points of fisticuffs. Very athletic, with abnormal upper body strength, and great speed and agility for a man his size. Once killed a deer and carried it 9 miles on his shoulders back to camp, while his companions had difficulty keeping up with him. 6’2 1/2”, with a fighting weight of 206 to 227. Later ballooned to over 250 lbs., despite being very disciplined about his training during his career. Hit with sledgehammer force, and had a granite chin, which allowed him to absorb punishment, making for an unbeatable combination, and his sobriquet, ‘the Boilermaker.’ Had good management and training, as well as the ability to soak up instruction, so that he quickly rose through the heavyweight ranks. Won the championship of that division from Bob Fitzsimmons (Lee Marvin) in only his 13th fight in 1899, despite the latter being the clear favorite. Never defeated or knocked down during his prime. Married a woman named Frieda in 1904, the same year he retired, one daughter from the union. Came out of retirement in 1910, as the much-hyped ‘great white hope,’ a sentiment which he did not share, to fight black champion Jack Johnson (Magic Johnson) in a bout that Tex Rickard (Jack Nicholson) promoted. Had to lose nearly 100 pounds, was well past his prime, and had not fought in 6 years, putting him at extreme disadvantage even before the bout. He was subsequently so severely beaten, his chief second had to throw in the towel in the middle of the 15th round. Spent the latter part of his life training other boxers and promoting fights. Nearly went bankrupt in the crash of 1929, although recovered. Died in his sleep. Inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1990. Inner: Extremely clean-cut, highly moral and ethical. Well-liked and trusted by one and all. Gruff and taciturn, and ranked by all as among the 5 greatest all-time in his division. Great white hype lifetime of evincing honesty and valor in a profession not known for either, before returning, like many of his fellow ring performers to the less physically, but more emotionally, demanding arena of celluloid illusion.

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