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SHOW BUSINESS - COMEDIANS - 3

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS HIGH-HUMORED POLITICO:
Storyline: The progressive wrestler allows his natural wit cultural ascendence, before getting down to the far more familiar terrain of elective office, in yet another sly grappling with the sweaty two-faced American body politic.

dAl Franken (Allen Stuart Franken) (1951) American comedian, writer and politician. Outer: Of German and Russian Jewish descent. Father was a printing salesman. His family moved to St. Louis Park, Minnesota where he grew up. Older brother Owen became a photojournalist. An active athlete and strongly built, he was a wrestler in high school, while also playing class clown alongside longtime writing partner, Tom Davis. 5’6”. Graduated cum laude from Harvard in 1973, while majoring in government. Met his wife, Franni Bryson, at a dance his freshman year, married in 1975, and the two have been a subsequent lifelong item, son and daughter from union. Became one of the original writers on “Saturday Night Live,” along with Davis, and stayed with the show for 5 years, between 1975 and 1980. His final year, he savaged NBC’s president in a mocking skit, which would negatively reverberate on his executive producer, Lorne Michaels, in his first overt playing with power structures. Later returned for a full decade in 1985. Wound up with 3 Emmys for his efforts, and a mushy New Age alter ego, Stuart Smalley, who he would take to the large screen as well. Proclaimed the 1980s as ‘the Al Franken decade,’ and also became a mock candidate for president. In 1992, he penned the first of his several number one bestsellers, I'm Good Enough, I'm Smart Enough and Doggone It, People Like Me: Daily Affirmations By Stuart Smalley, before quickly moving on to the directly political, taking on two of the major unrepentant avatars of strident traditionalism, Rush Limbaugh and Bill O’Reilly, via his writings. Unsuccessfully sued by Fox News, which further enhanced his sales, allowing him to be one of the main posterboys for the entertaining left through the 1990s and into the new century. Penned and starred in Stuart Saves the Family, among other scripts, and created a brief run sitcom “Lateline,” to add to his scrivening credits. Following the Iraq War, he became the first syndicated radio host to visit that benighted country, as a headliner for USO shows, and has been actively engaged with USO tours ever since. Used his wresting skills to take-down an aggressive heckler at a Howard Dean political rally, in 2004, and the same year, he became linchpin anchor of Air America, a struggling liberal radio network created to counter the influence of the rabid voices on the other end of the political spectrum. Named his show, “The O’Franken Factor,” which elicited noise of a suit from Fox, the proprietors of “The O’Reilly Factor.” Averred that his basic reason for entering daily broadcasting was to defeat George W. Bush’s bid for a second term, but then when that didn’t happen, he decided to continue for another two years. Began his own political action committee following the election, and stayed away from spouting show biz celebrities on his show. Subsequently ended his o’factor, for the express purpose of running for senator from Minnesota in 2008, and won a resounding endorsement from the Democratic Party to do so. Ran into rough going, however, as his previous comedic statements were continually used against him by his opponent Sen. Norm Coleman, in order to exaggerate his character. Nevertheless, he learned the local politics of Minnesota, and subjected himself to the state’s scrutiny via endless barbecues, while trying to tailor his innate aggressiveness into the more subdued demands of political campaigning. Lost initially, but garnered enough votes for a highly contested recount, which would drag on for weeks, before he was declared ther winner, although he wasn’t officially confirmed by the state Supreme Court until nearly 8 months later to become the first professional comedian ever elected to the Senate. Proved a liberal voice there, with a couple of bill amendments, while working on several committees, including the judiciary, where he presided over Pres. Obama’s first two successful choices for the Supreme Court. In 2014, he won a second term partially through winning over rural working-class voters through his protectionist policies, setting himself up for a possible 2020 presidential run. His well-received 2017 memoir, “Giant of the Senate” allows him to return to his jokester persona, after a decade of tempering his humor because of a need to project senatorial seriousness. In the wake of numerous Tinsel Town sexual scandals, he sheepishly apologized for forcing a kiss on radio hose and model, Leeann Tweeden on a USO tour in 2008, during a rehearsal for the show,. but refused to resign. A second woman subsequently came forwards with another accusation, tarnishing his reputation further.. Has a net worth of $8 million. Inner: Sly and serious, with a standard liberal agenda, and a genuine desire to expose hypocrisy and dishonesty in public life. Policy wonk and confrontational nerd, with a powerful competitive sensibility. Tongue in cheek and in check lifetime of bringing his old warrior sensibilities to bear in a bearish body with a fey wit, in order to do battle with the dishonesty of modern life. dThomas Riley Marshall (1854-1925) - American politician and wit. Outer: Father was an old-fashioned country doctor. At 2, he was taken by his parents to Illinois, then to Kansas, and Missouri, before moving back to Indiana. Enjoyed listening to lawyers while he was growing up, and always wanted to be one. Studied law as well as the classics at Wabash College in Indiana, where he was Phi Beta Kappa and was admitted to the bar in 1875, on his 21st birthday. Over a 33 year career, he took on both civil and criminal cases. Had blue-grey eyes, and a genial smile. Noted for his sly wit, he became a popular speaker and got involved in politics, although he lost his first run for office as a prosecutor in 1880. Married Lois Kimsey (Stephanie Miller) in 1895. No children from the close union Taught Sunday School as a Presbyterian, and was also a 33rd degree Mason, while both he and his wife were active in church affairs. Able to overcame a drinking problem, he spoke at temperance meetings. As a self-styled “progressive with the brakes on” and a Democrat like his dad, he was elected in 1909 to the governorship of Indiana. Successfully fought against sterilization laws, as well as child labor and corruption, but most of his legislation withered in the Indiana legislature. In 1912, he was originally nominated by his own state for president, and wound up as vice-president, under Woodrow Wilson (Michael Eric Dyson), winning the office again in 1916, despite originally turning down the job, thinking it would render him politically impotent. The duo would be the first in nearly a century to do a double electoral repeat, despite Wilson’s original low assessment of his abilities. Initially viewed as radical for speaking against the acquisitive class, he later toned his rhetoric down, to become America’s best-liked second-in-command. Presided over the Senate with both grace and tact, although he found his voice stifled, and his position curtailed even more, when Wilson bypassed him to deal with members of the Senate, a role traditionally reserved for the vice-present. Continued as a public speaker during this period, and actively pushed war bonds on the country during its belated entry into WW I, after standing as an neutralist beforehand. Issued his most famous mot during a Senate debate, in 1917, "What this country needs is a really good five-cent cigar," during a rancorous session around America’s exigencies. Conducted cabinet meetings during the president’s subsequent European forays following the war. When Wilson suffered a debilitating stroke in the fall of 1919, he refused to declare himself acting president, feeling it would create a dangerous precedent. Wilson managed to avoid personal contact with him the rest of the way through, just in case he might get any other ideas, as he performed all the chief executive’s ceremonial duties, while the latter’s wife, Edith Wilson (Michelle Bernard), was de facto president. Thought about running for chief executive in 1920, but elicited little interest from his own party members. Resumed his law practice afterwards, and also wrote a number of books on the law as well as his memoirs. Died from a heart attack on a business trip to Washington, D.C. Inner: Sly-witted, modest and good-humored, with an elfin sense about him. Lovable, generous, and, doggone it, people liked him. Seemingly more interested in expression than action, albeit a diehard progressive. Sly witted lifetime of bypassing the presidency for fear of precedent, in a go-round that largely gave talk precedence over action, and small concerns priority over the unrealized possibility, thanks to fate, of deeply affecting his times.

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PATHWAY OF THE ENTERTAINER AS SEXY LIBERAL:
Storyline: The riotous radio hostess carves a unique niche for herself on the largely conservative airwaves with her unconstrained take on current politics, thanks to a multi-life intimacy with the vice-presidency, both as partner of and then daughter of a failed candidate for that office.

Stephanie Miller (Stephanie Catherine Miller) (1961) - American comedienne. Outer: Of German and Irish descent on her paternal side. Father was William E. Miller, the chairman of the the Republican National Committee at the time of his youngest child’s birth, and three years later Sen. Barry Goldwater’s running mate on the losing Republican ticket. Youngest of four with two sisters and a brother. Grew up in a conservative Catholic household in Lockport, NY., and wound up sharing the same sly humor as her progenitor. 5’7” with dark brown hair and a slim build. Graduated from USC with a major in theater, and then started her professional career as a stand-up comedian, performing at the Laugh Factory in Hollywood, while also doing bit parts in films beginning with Hog Wild in 1980. Later she would play herself in a number of TV series. Began working on radio in the early 1980s, creating the character of “Sister Sleaze” and gradually broadcasting to larger markets in NYC and Chicago, before being hired by KFI in Los Angeles in 1993 to host a nightly talk show, and the city would become her base. Briefly had a syndicated late night TV talk show, although it only ran for 13 weeks in 1995. Went back to radio, but also co-hosted a CNBC TV talk show “Equal Time” serving as the liberal foil to Bay Buchanan, the sister of conservative Pat Buchanan. Did some more fluff TV, before finally finding her true metier with her own eponymous morning hours talk show, which was launched in 2004, along with voice actor Jim Ward and a host of different co-hosts, so that the show is often a conversation between many people. talking over each other, as well as a multitude of call-ins, most of whom have the same liberal bent she does. Came out as a lesbian in 2010, and remains one of the more popular radio hostesses, for her sly wit and uninhibited progressive political stances. Also goes on tour with her various helpmates under the rubric of the “Sexy Liberal” Tour, visiting various large cities for one night entertainment stands. Has a net worth of $2 million. Inner: Known as ‘Mama’ to her fans. Often shares intimate details of her life on air, using her show as a personal confessional. Wicked wit lifetime of running counter to her conservative family’s values and taking on a self-appointed role as public social scold over perceived injustices to the American body politic. Lois Irene Marshall (Lois Irene Kimsey) (1873-1956) - American political spouse. Outer: Father was a farmer, merchant, postmaster, lawyer and ultimately a banker. Oldest of two with a younger brother. Went to the Tri-State College at Angola, Indiana, then worked as a clerk in her father’s law firm. In 1895, she married Thomas Riley Marshall (Al Franken),.who was nearly two decades her senior. No children from the extremely close union. Helped her husband through his strugglers with alcohol, and proved a steady support in his political rise, as he toned down his progressivism to meet the more moderate standards of the day. Served as first lady of Indiana when her spouse was elected governor in 1909, and then moved to Washington, when he became Woodrow Wilson’s (Michael Eric Dyson) vice-president in 1913, serving under him for two terms. Active in charitable organizations including the Diet Kitchen Welfare Center, which helped feed poor children. Became a surrogate mother to an ill baby, taking him in, but never officially adopting him, only to see him die at the age of four. Lost her good-humored husband in 1925, and moved to Arizona, where her parents lived. Always returned to Indiana to vote, while ultimately settling in Phoenix, staying at a downtown resort hotel towards the end. Suffered a stroke and died in a Phoenix hospital. Inner: Charitable, highly political and good-humored like her husband. Support lifetime of learning the ins-and-outs of national politics through an intimate association, before returning to give unique voice to her own expanded view of the nation’s body politic.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER/DIRECTOR AS COMEDY CLASSICIST:
Storyline: The comedic triple threat manages to bust his own self-destructive ghosts from the past, while turning his previous demons into funny filmic fare, rather than life-destroyers, as he had in his previous ungrounded and whole self-destructive hog go-round.
dHarold Ramis (1944-2014) - American actor, screenwriter and director. Outer: Of Ukranian and Polish Jewish descent. Parents owned a food and liquor mart. 6’2”. Graduated from Washington Univ. in St. Louis, and then worked briefly as an orderly in a mental ward facility. Began his career as a joke editor for Playboy magazine, while also performing with Chicago’s Second City improvisational crew, although unlike several of his fellow alums, he was not asked to join the cast of TV’s Saturday Night Live. Married Anne Plotkin in 1967, one daughter from the union. Appeared in the Broadway Revue “National Lampoon’s Lemmings,” and then worked as both a writer and performer on Canadian SCTV series for three years in the late 1970s, creating several memorable characters, including Swami Banananda, as well as doing impersonations. Co-wrote the comedy classic, Animal House, which put him on the comedic map, and then began a filmic collaboration with Saturday Night Live alum Bill Murray, doing 6 popular films with him, including his directorial debut 1980’s Caddyshack, although the two would eventually part professional company over creative differences in their last, and best collaboration, Groundhog Day. In 1984, he collaborated with Dan Aykroyd on the enormously successful Ghostbusters, playing a small role in it, and then co-wrote its sequel with his crypto-brother as well. Divorced in 1984 and in 1987, he married Erica Mann, a crew member, two sons from the second union. His best received film, 1993’s Groundhog Day, in which his protagonist continually repeats a day in his life until he finally gets it right, would be an unconscious paean to reincarnation, and be viewed as his masterpiece. Liberally played with drugs and alcohol in his works, transmuting his earlier obsessions into screen fare rather than unhappy elements in his own far better integrated life. Although wholly committed to comedy as his genre of choice, he also added dramatic elements to his subsequent work, while still looking for laughs as his ultimate expression of audience appreciation for what he did. Began struggling with health issues in 2010. and has to relearn to walk because of an autoimmune dis=ease, never fully recovering from it. Died at his home surrounded by his family of complications from autoimmune inflammatory vasculitis, a rare disease that involves swelling of the blood vessels. Inner: Good-humored, viewing laughter as the best medicine for all social ills. Cerebral and iconoclastic in his approach to comedy. Never let success change him. Groundhog Day lifetime of finding a far more supportive environment in which to explore his sensibilities, after finally getting it right in a repeat professional performance of his earlier go-round. dJames Parrott (1898-1939) - American actor, screenwriter and director. Outer: Father died of a heart attack when he was 5, forcing the family to move in with a relative. Supported in part by his older sibling, Charley Chase (Dan Aykroyd) who quit school early, and then entered show business. 5’9”. Followed his example when he reached his teens, after earlier running with Baltimore street gangs. Charley got him work acting in silent comedies at the Hal Roach Studios, before he found his true métier in directing said-same in the early 1920s, just as his brother had. Worked with numerous comedians in their ongoing series, as well concocting several well-received one-reelers in which he starred under the name Paul Parrott and Jimmy Parrott. Made some 75 shorts during the first half of the 20s, although was predisposed towards alcoholism, just like his brother. Made an easy transition to sound and hooked up with the comedy team of Stan Laurel (Stanley Tucci) and Oliver Hardy (Oliver Platt), to create numerous two-reel classics, including their first feature in 1931 and the Oscar-winning The Music Box the following year. Directed his brother as well. During the decade, however, he fought weight problems with amphetamines, and got lost in a cycle of drugs and drink, making him more and more unreliable, and finally largely unemployable, despite his distinct talents. Forced to leave the Roach Studios, he worked only sporadically afterwards, directing no films after 1935. By 1937, he was supported totally by his brother. Married briefly in 1937, but was far too unstable to maintain any kind of relationship. Officially died of heart failure, although probably committed suicide with an overdose of pills. His sibling was so guilt-ridden, that he drank himself to death the following year. Inner: Extremely creative, but with a strong dependence on stimulants to keep his comic juices flowing. Sad funnyman lifetime of showing a sure hand on set, but totally at sea off it, ultimately drowning in his own problems, without being able to see or laugh his way past them.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER IN SEARCH OF HEARTFELT PERFORMANCE:
Storyline: The gendarme-friendly ghost-buster can never quite bust through his own barriers that hold his audiences back from truly embracing him, despite his comparable and often superior skills to his better-loved contemporaries.

dDan Aykroyd (1952) - Canadian/American comedian. Outer: Grandfather was a mountie. Father was a civil engineer who eventually became Canada’s assistant deputy minister of transportation. Hyperactive as a child, he was occasionally beat with a belt by both parents to cool out. His parents separated when he was 13, and he stayed with his mother. Expelled from Catholic elementary school at 12, arrested for drunkenness at 14. Did improvisational theater and played the drums, while working part-time in high school. 6’1” and increasingly larger-bodied as he has gotten older. Dropped out of Carlton Univ. in Ottawa where he had studied criminology, then worked as a train brakeman and surveyor before embarking on a comedy career. Joined the Toronto version of the Second City Troupe and did Canadian TV, before coming to NYC in his early 20s. Shortly afterwards, he became one of the original members of “Saturday Night Live,” spending 5 seasons on the show, and winning an Emmy in 1997 for his writing. Teamed up with longtime cohort John Belushi to dominate the show, then starred with him in The Blues Brothers, a cult classic, and the duo went on to make an equally popular album. Had a successful film career of his own, including the hugely popular Ghostbusters, which he co-wrote with Harold Ramis, and a surprising dramatic turn in Driving Miss Daisy. although never was a star attraction himself. Pens most of his scripts, and is an excellent mimic. His 2nd marriage, after a divorce, was to actress Donna Dixon in 1983, 3 daughters from union. One of the co-owners of the Hard Rock Cafe. Made his directing debut in his mid-30s, with Nothing But Trouble, although it was under-appreciated. Continues to work as a hefty secondary foil to fellow comics, while doing both comic and occasional dramatic turns in films. Also a highly successful entrepreneur, making a small fortune introducing Patron tequila to Canada, before opening an eponymous winery near Lincoln, Ontario, in the realization of a longtime dream. Inner: Serious and reserved, allowing his manic side expression only in performance. Difficulty in connecting emotionally with his audience. Fascinated with police-work, he owns a Toronto bar with several officers, and sometimes rides in squad-cars. Equally intrigued by the supernatural. Claims to have personally encountered UFOs in the past, while believing aliens have deliberately avoided contact with humanity because we are a violent, depraved species. Partially realized lifetime, once again, of showing excellent comic aptitude, and yet not quite able to make himself a well-loved performer. dCharley Chase (Charles Parrott) (1893-1940) - American comic actor and director. Outer: Father suffered a fatal heart attack when he was 10, putting the family in extreme financial straits, and forcing them to move in with a relative. Quit school in order to support his mother and younger brother James Parrott (Harold Ramis), who became an actor and director. At 16, he began singing pop songs with lantern slides in movie houses. Became a song-and-dance man in vaudeville and musical comedy, and performed monologues in an Irish accent. 6’, 155 lbs. Came to Hollywood in his early 20s, and joined Mack Sennett’s (Quentin Tarantino) Keystone comedies as a second banana. Worked with Charlie Chaplin, and then for several other companies. Began directing his own comedies while still in his early 20s, and also worked with some of the top comic stars of the day. Married Bebe Eltinge in 1914, 2 children from the union.. Moderately successful until his late 20s, when he joined the Hal Roach studios, as a writer/director. Directed some delightful films in the early 1920s, before returning to performing at 30, where he enjoyed great two-reeler popularity as a dapper mild-mannered figure forever being undone by life’s vicissitudes, or as a henpecked husband. Also had a propensity to play totally obnoxious characters, with little redeeming humor to them. Made the transition to sound quite easily, showing a fine singing voice. During the 1930s, he played supporting roles in features, switching studios in his early 40s, to Columbia, where he continued directing. Dipped into heavy drinking all during the decade, despite doctor’s warnings, and after his sibling’s suicide death, his guilt-ridden imbibing escalated, and he died of a heart attack within a year of the latter’s premature demise. Made over 200 shorts in both the silent and sound eras, and, even though some were quite clever, they never aroused the interest in revival that his other contemporaries later inspired. Inner: Serious comic, with a darker side that never was fully released or transposed through his performances. Partially realized lifetime of showing flashes of brilliance, but, once again, never truly connecting up with his audience, as others of comparable potential talent did, and ultimately self-destructing over that uncontrolled failure.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS ETERNAL CHILD:
Storyline: The arrested adolescent literally gets arrested for exposure, in order to release himself from the imprisonment of his own self-creations and move on to a more satisfactory level of himself.

dPeewee Herman (Paul Rubenfeld) (1952) - American comedian. Outer: Family moved to Sarasota, Florida when he was a child, where they owned a lamp store. Both parents had a good sense of humor, supportive household. Began acting in grade school, and appeared on the stage at 11, continuing his pursuit of acting in high school. Spent a year at Boston Univ. before transferring to the California Institute of the Arts, from which he graduated. Teamed with an aspiring comedienne as the Hilarious Betty and Eddie, doing puppet shows and sound effects, winning top prize on TV’s “Gong Show.” 5’11”, slender and boyish. Joined The Groundlings improvisational troupe in his late 20s, foreshortening his professional name to Paul Reubens. Developed a baby-faced manic character named Pee-Wee Herman in his mid-20s, replete with bowtie and tight-fitting suit, unconsciously aping his earlier foray into films as Harry Langdon. Made his screen debut in a bit part in The Blues Brothers, 2 years later. After performing on an HBO special as a childish master-of-ceremonies, became the eponymous star of his own show in a Los Angeles nightclub, and then developed a successful Saturday morning children’s TV show in 1986 called “Pee-Wee’s Playhouse,” in which his ingratiating childlike character attracted an adult as well as children’s audience. Definitely not to everyone’s taste, he often confused his audience with his insouciant satire, but it ran for 5 years, thanks to its continual inventiveness, replete with talking furniture, and an unprecedented budget of $425,000 an episode. In 1985, he scored with his first film, Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure, then co-scripted and co-produced his next feature, Big Top Pee-Wee. When he appeared on TV talk shows, he always stayed in character, playing a 7 year old in a grown-up body. Ended his TV show by choice in 1991 after its ratings began to fail and shortly afterwards, he was arrested during a pornographic film called Naughty Nurses for exposing himself. The ploy may have been a deliberate unconscious attempt at presenting a more mature version of himself to the public, as his collar caused more public condemnation of the arresters than the arrestee. In his booking photo, he appeared goateed and far darker than his public character. Deeply depressed over the incident, he retreated from the world, refusing to make a mea culpa appearance, and very gradually began re-integrating himself back into his chosen profession, as a different version of himself, taking nearly a decade to do so. Sporadically continued his movie career, in support roles, although he was never able to gain the attention and acclaim that his earlier oddball characterization had warranted. Eventually returned to TV as host of a short-lived comedy quiz show, “You Don’t Know Jack.” Arrested on an obscenity charge in 2003 for possessing pornographic material related to children, in his ongoing struggle to get past his gargantuan inner child, and later pleaded guilty to the charge, for which he was fined and put on probation. Able to still get series work on TV afterwards, although at a considerably lower profile. Essayed his comeback in 2010 on Broadway with “The Peewee Herman Show,” a gleeful reprise of his past silliness, rather than much updated salliness, in keeping with a desire to reintroduce himself along extremely familiar lines, in his ongoing public rehabilitation, which showed him that all was forgiven for the moment, if he stayed within safe childlike bounds. After spot roles in a variety of TV series, he joined the cast in 2015 of the TV series “Gotham” playing the Penguin’s father. Inner: Manic, sensitive to criticism, satirical, and far more conflicted within than he has ever dared expose. Arrested development lifetime of purposefully destroying his childlike image in order to explore a more mature sensibility, while trying to allow himself, in the process, to at last grow up, despite an audience wishing to keep him forever in his own past. dHarry Langdon (1884-1944) - American comedian. Outer: Parents were both Salvation Army officers. Began working to help support the family as a prop boy, then became a cartoonist and a barber before joining a medicine show in Nebraska in his late teens. Spent 2 decades traveling with a variety of minstrel shows and circuses, then doing vaudeville and burlesque circuits, eventually enjoying a modest success, with his first wife, Rose Musolff, whom he had married at 19, as a foil. In his late 30s, he entered films in 2 reel shorts with Mack Sennett (Quentin Tarantino), and quickly established a unique childlike character for himself, playing in whiteface with a dented hat and offering himself as the epitome of innocence and naivete, replete with an outfit that he had seemingly outgrown. Whenever he was confronted with a potentially erotic situation, he often assumed an almost depraved demeanor in his efforts to uncomprehendingly deal with it. Became one of the late silent eras top comedians, through the expert direction and writings of others. In his early 30s, he took his team with him to Warner Bros., where he did his 3 best features in a row. Felt, however, that he could do better by himself, and began writing and directing his own material, but failed miserably, as Warners terminated his contract. As inept off-screen with money as he was on-screen with the situations in which he found himself, he wound up paying huge amounts of alimony out of his prodigious salary, after divorcing his wife following 25 years of marriage. Was sued for alienation of affections, after breaking up the previous marriage of his 3rd wife, Helen Walton, before wedding her in 1929 and divorcing her 3 years later. Did not realize the limitations of his own appeal, carrying his childishness over into his personal life. Went back to vaudeville after his film failures, then returned to Hollywood at the advent of the sound era, which found him completely out-of-touch with the times. Forced to file for bankruptcy in 1931, after a comeback went nowhere. Continued to appear sporadically in films, making a living off of low budget vehicles as well as writing gags, while dreaming of hitting it big once again. In his 50s, he married, divorced and remarried Mabel Sheldon, one son from the final back-and-forth union. Died of a cerebral hemorrhage. Inner: Immature and childlike to the point of extreme narcissism, with little connection to any other reality than his own. Arrested development lifetime of allowing his naivete to run rampant for a brief spell of popularity and then a long, torturous fall, while childishly never giving up the projected dreams he had for his limited appeal.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS ARCHETYPAL NERD:
Storyline: The dismounted jockey takes a mild ride on his own odd steed, after exploring the possibilities of partnership on the comedy circuit, and finding he would rather go it as a lesser, albeit, single rider.

dRick Moranis (Frederick Alan Moranis) (1953) - Canadian/American comedian. Outer: Of Jewish descent. Worked part/time as a radio engineer while still in high school, then hosted his own comedy show on radio, unconsciously repeating his jockeying of his previous existence, switching from horses to discs, while using the name Rick Allen. 5’2”, unprepossessing-looking, bespectacled. In his mid-20s, he began performing improvisational comedy on stage, worked briefly in L.A. doing the same, then went home and started writing for and appearing on Canadian SCTV, gaining notoriety as one of the McKenzie brothers, Bob and Doug, along with Dave Thomas. The duo were a pair of one-joke beer-drinkers, which gave him his movie debut at 30, Strange Brew, a film he co-wrote and co-directed. Married artist Ann Belsky, 2 children. Played variations off his nerdy image, including star turns in Little Shop of Horrors and Honey, I Shrunk the Kids. Had an active film career, mostly in supporting roles, and while never a household name, he was always able to hold his own with more high profile comedians. After his wife died of breast cancer in 1991, he began writing songs to ease the sense of loss. Stopped making movies in the mid-1990s, to concentrate on being a single parent, and found he didn’t really miss film at all. In 2005, he recorded his first album of self-penned dead-panned comic songs, “The Agoraphobic Cowboy,” after which he retired from performing to focus on his family. Inner: Good sardonic sense of humor, preferring subtly in his written work which extends to op-ed pieces. Second banana lifetime of expressing his comic gift in a comic body, while turning loss and sorrow into song. dRobert Woolsey (1889-1938) - American comedian. Outer: American comedian. Outer: Had an impoverished upbringing. Father died when he was 7, and his mother had to support her brood of 6, with several dying young, Began his working life as an exercise boy, then became a jockey, but had to retire from racing at 18 after he was thrown from a horse, and broke his leg, unwittingly acting out a old showbiz petition for good luck. 5’5 1/2”. Did a variety of odd jobs, including being a bellboy, where he met some actors, who encouraged him to launch a comic career, then entered show business via the theater, and eventually was performing in Gilbert & Sullivan operettas, touring both North America and the British Empire. Married Mignonne Park Reed, an eccentric dancer in his late 20s, and she wound up outliving him by half a century. No children from the union. Began starring on Broadway in his early 30s, and also wrote plays, before being teamed up with fellow comic Bert Wheeler (Amy Schumer) in his late 30s, first on Broadway in “Rio Rita,” in 1927, and then on film doing a reprise of it. Added Dorothy Lee to their mix, and starred in their own feature, The Cuckoos, which would lead to a host of films, as they both realized they worked better as a comic duo, than as singles. Wore glasses, smoked a cigar, and acted the wise guy to Wheeler’s innocent, although their material was obvious and dated, depending more on form than substance. Proved popular, nevertheless, in vaudeville and numerous comedies of the 1930s for the undemanding audiences of the time. Far less successful without Wheeler in their separate ventures, as they reached a peak in the first half of the decade and then, with new writers, were less inventive and far more formulaic, as well as less inspired. Died of a liver ailment and kidney disease. Inner: Looked and acted like fellow comic George Burns. Slightly less cartoonish than many of the screen teams of the time, with an obvious chemistry that was absent when they went single. Reined-in lifetime of exploring teamwork as a means of comic art, although far less inspired than the top tier of funny people working simultaneously with him, despite immense popularity for a stretch.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS ACCIDENT WAITING TO HAPPEN:
Storyline: The compleat misanthrope finds self-destruction as the best revenge against a world in which he feels he is an angry prisoner.

dSam Kinison (1953-1992) - American comedian. Outer: Father was a Pentecostal preacher, and he had an uncomfortable childhood traveling with his family on the revival circuit. 3rd of 4 boys, with two brothers committing suicide.. Short and heavyset, he followed in his father’s professional footsteps for 7 years during the 1970s, then took his all-abiding anger into the comedy realm, after losing his interest in God. Spent 5 years working up his screaming preacher act, before receiving his first big break from comic Rodney Dangerfield, who featured him on an HBO special when he was in his early 30s. Married and divorced twice, he continually used the 2 unions as a source of bitter material. Donning a beret and a large overcoat, he would harangue his audience with his skewed perceptions of both their spiritual and societal beliefs, painting a bleak picture of our largely soul/less world. Took on the sobriquet of ‘The Beast of Burden,’ running fiendish riffs about starvation, marital abuse and violence. When banned from the Comedy Workshop in Houston, he staged a mock crucifixion across the street. His career took off after a censored appearance on “Saturday Night Live,” in his mid-30s, and he suddenly found himself a comedy celebrity, albeit not without his vociferous detractors. After doing concerts and making albums, he made his film debut in 1986 in his mentor Dangerfield’s Back to School, and was set to star in his own vehicle, when problems on the set brought it to a halt, costing him in turn his huge salary, then his manager, and finally, his brother, who shot himself during a family reunion. Critics harped on his cocaine abuse, while those who took offense at his raps in his audience grew, and his career quickly waned. Began to play to undiscriminating heavy metal fans, who liked his various ‘anti’ stances, and started experimenting with singing while his humor slipped into the pure gross-out realm, as befit his new audience. Picketed by homophiles, he saw himself plummet once again by his late 30s, as his screaming act began to get far too predictable. To add to his emotional squalor, his girlfriend was raped by his 300 pound bodyguard, while the comedian slept nearby, not even waking when she fired off 4 shots, all of them missing her target. Finally quit drinking, and married a 3rd time to Maliki Souiri, a dancer, and was trying to reign in his act, but a week after the wedding, he was killed in an auto accident near Needles, California, when a drunk teenage driver hit him head on, while heading for a concert in Nevada. Emerged with only minor injuries from the accident, but then collapsed and died at the scene, while his wife and the other driver survived. Inner: Enraged, perceptive, and ultimately willing to change. Secret desire to be normal, despite his abnormal amount of anger. Needled lifetime of acting out his self-acknowledged Beast to see what revelations it would bring him. dTed Healy (Charles Earnest Lee Nash) (1896-1937) - American comedian. Outer: From humble origins. In 1908, his family moved from Texas to NYC, where he completed his education. Originally wanted to be a businessman, but he found the lure of the stage too strong, and in 1919 launched his career in amateur shows, doing impromptu burlesque jokes. 5’10 1/2”. Changed his name and turned professional, and soon developed into an audience favorite with his patter, songs and impressions, while using a crushed hat as his trademark. Married Betty Brown, a singer and dancer, in 1922, and she joined him as a comedy and dance team. Began using stooges in his act, ultimately employing childhood friends Moe and Shemp Howard (Howie Mandel), who along with vaudeville violinist Larry Fine became the Three Stooges. Their act relied on violence, causing the former and the latter to eventually leave him, after they found his abrasive personality and bossiness far too difficult to work with. Nevertheless, he became the highest paid vaudevillian in the country. Appeared on Broadway with Shemp Howard, before the quartet reunited for 2 more Broadway shows. Took the lion’s share of their combined salary, making $6000 a week, although critics found him unfunny. A heavy drinker, who frequently got into brawls, he switched over to films in the early 1930s, and the group broke up once again, affecting one more reconciliation, for a series of features and shorts, before a permanent rupture in their partnership ended it in 1934, while his wife had earlier divorced him in 1932 because of his constant infidelity. Appeared in several more films on his own, and became Hollywood’s highest-paid supporting comedian and character actor, but he continued in a downward spiral, and despite his successes, found himself constantly broke because of his drinking and gambling. Remarried in 1936 to Betty Hickman, one son from union. Out celebrating the latter’s birth, when he got into a fight with 3 college students, who beat him unconscious. Found on the street by comedian Joe Frisco, who took him back to his apartment, where he died of a heart attack from his injuries. Inner: Angry, pugnacious, extremely self-damaging. Liked to toss telephone books out hotel windows to scare people. The singular respect he showed was for his audience, otherwise everyone else was target for his mayhem, save for children. Frequently gave Christmas parties for poor urchins, spending hundreds of dollars on presents for them, otherwise, he was as uncharitable as he could be. Cocked fist lifetime of uninhibited expression of his deep, dark side, and ultimately reducing himself to pulp over it.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS PHOBIC STOOGE:
Storyline: The fear-flecked funnyman continues his neurotic obsessions, while turning his natural proclivity for entertaining into a long-running career in various comic genres, and his own disorders as a spur to make light of everything else.

dHowie Mandel (Howard Michael Mandel) (1955) - Canadian/American comedian, producer, writer and TV host. Outer: Of Polish Jewish descent. Father was a lighting manufacturer and realtor. One of two brothers and a distant cousin of violinist Itzhak Perlman. Expelled from high school for impersonating a member of the school and signing a construction contract, he became a carpet salesman, before opening his own carpet business. 5’9” with brown eyes and black hair, which he eventually shaved. Began his career as a standup comedian in Toronto, with one of his bits, blowing up a latex glove and wearing it as a cockscomb, which became a signature routine until a perforated sinus ended it. On a dare on a trip to LA in 1979, he stepped up to an open mike on an amateur night at the Comedy Store, and quickly became a regular there. The appearance led to a game show, “Make Me Laugh,” as well other TV and stage appearances, and what the carpet world lost, the entertainment world gained. In 1980, he married Terry Soil, a high school friend, two daughters and a son from the union. Spent the entire 6 year run of TV’s “St. Elsewhere,” between 1982 and 1988 as a resident doctor, and followed that turn with an animated children’s show, “Bobby’s World,” which he created and produced, as well as voiced, enjoying a further 8 year run with it. TV would be his primary vehicle, with his film fare far less than memorable. Fed into the Navy’s paranoia with an inappropriate routine at the Naval Academy in 1993, following sex scandals in that service. Thought about quitting show business the following year, then enjoyed a run on Showtime with his own series, but failed in 1998 with an eponymous talk show, while continuing his high profile career, doing standup, guest appearances and commercials. A complete germophobe, he shaved his head through a desire to have one less area of his body attracting disease, before taking over hosting duties for “Deal or No Deal,” in 2005, which became a five day-a-week syndicated game show for 4 seasons. Added “Howie Do It,” a hidden camera reality series in 2009 to his ubiquitous TV presence. Constantly on the road and performing, while dealing with his fears and obsessions without allowing them to over/run his life. Hospitalized for an irregular heartbeat in 2009, which probably shook him to the core, although recovered from it, and in 2010 took over David Hasselhoff’s chair on “America’s Got Talent,” for six seasons, while also doing other TV work. Has a net worth of $40 million.Inner: His terror of germs leads him to publicly fist pump rather than shake hands, while his shaved head is part of his mysophobic fear of viral contamination. Neurotically unable to use any bathroom but his one at home. Family man, warm and friendly. Obsessive-compulsive lifetime of continuing to use his dreads as a means to spur his sharply-defined sense of humor, in a direct continuance of the positive and negatives of his previous go-round in this series. dShemp Howard (Samuel Horowitz) (1895-1955) - American comedian. Outer: Of Lithuanian ancestry. Mother was a real estate entrepreneur and father was a clothing cutter. Third of five brothers, including Moe and Curly (Dave Chappelle), the foundation of the Three Stooges comedy act. A prankster as a child, who got his nickname early on through his mother’s mispronunciation of his name. Unlike his sibling Moe, he never seriously entertained the idea of a career in show business, despite being a cutup. Wound up with his sibling in trade school, learning to be a plumber, although all his subsequent failed efforts at earning a living left him with the singular alternative of the comic theater. Began with Moe in amateur productions, although they both got the hook with their first performance. Nevertheless, they continued entertaining locally at dancehalls, before forming a blackface vaudeville act. Drafted during the WW I period, although was soon discharged for bedwetting. Continued on the vaudeville circuit with Moe, before hooking up with Ted Healy (Sam Kinison), a former schoolmate, in 1922. Became one of his audience stooges along with Moe and Larry Fine in a highly successful act that was marred offstage by Healy’s abusive personality. In 1925, he married Gertrude “Babe” Frank, one son from the union. Costarred in Soup to Nuts, then left Healy with the others to become the “Three Lost Souls,” only to rejoin him for another show in 1932. Went off on his own, as his youngest brother Curly replaced him, and fashioned his own career in two-reel comedies, as well as playing Knobby Walsh in the Joe Palooka series based on the comic strip fighter. In 1937 he opened the “Stage One” nightclub in Hollywood with a partner, and became a comic support in a host of Hollywood features. When Curly had a stroke, he rejoined the Stooges in 1946, and continued with them, making numerous shorts. Suffered a mild stroke in 1952, although continued working with the Stooges. Died of a heart attack in a taxicab, while returning home from a boxing match, slumping over into a friend’s lap in the middle of telling a joke. Inner: Extremely neurotic, with a host of phobias, including fear of heights, driving, flying, dogs and water. Known as a gracious host and Hollywood part-giver, as well as a warm, caring friend and family man, and, despite his antics, somewhat introverted. Uninterested in the larger world, or business, preferring sitting at home and watching TV, when not performing. Slapstick lifetime of dealing with a host of fears through an innate gift for comedy, an ongoing motif of his, as a combination of obsession, compulsion and simple good cheer.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS NITWIT TURNED INVENTIVE WIT:
Storyline: The highly inventive venter turns from slapstick and screwball antics to lacerating social commentary, showing the same proclivity for innovation in all he does, while evincing a curious ambivalence towards fame and success, despite his many gifts to entertain.

dDave Chappelle (David Khari Webber Chappelle) (1973) - American comedian, screenwriter, actor and producer. Outer: Of African-American descent. Both his parents were college professors, his father serving as an instructor in music and voice at Antioch College and his mother teaching at Howard Univ., among other schools, while also serving as a Unitarian minister. Grew up in Silver Springs, Maryland, and following the separation of his parents, remained in the Washington area with his mother, where he went to the Duke Ellington School of the Arts. 6’ and slim. Moved to NY afterwards, and was booed off the stage at the Apollo Theater to inaugurate his comedic career. Undaunted, he established himself on the city’s comedy circuit and at 20 made his film debut in Mel Brooks’s Robin Hood, although later turned down a part in the megahit Forrest Gump, deeming it demeaning. Despite numerous pilots, and an early series, his initial forays into TV were disappointing and frustrating. Following his father’s death in 1998, he thought about giving up entirely on his comedic career, and converted to Islam. Subsequently abandoned TV for the movies, including one effort he co-wrote and starred in, Half-Baked, a paean to pot-smoking, one of his ongoing escapes, along with cigarettes. Married Elaine Erfe, a Filipina in 2001, 3 sons from the union. Settled with them in Yellow Springs, Ohio, where his father had taught, to purposefully distance himself from any kind of show business milieu. Launched “Chappelle’s Show,” on the Comedy Central network in 2003, a sketch comedy show which would feature his acute observational humor in the tradition of his two comedic heroes, Richard Pryor and Eddie Murphy. The show was a huge success, earning the plaudits of Pryor, while setting a sales record for its first season DVD. Given a $50 million contract for two more years, despite feeling sketch comedy was too limiting, much like film shorts, and that the time he was putting into it was curtailing his desire to pursue his standup career, a format he much preferred. Walked away from his contract at the start of season three, and went to South Africa, in a display of pique at the direction of the show, while rumor abounded of both drug and mental problems. Following his hiatus, he returned to standup in 2013 and pursued other avenues of expression, including a documentary, “Dave Chappelle’s Block Party,” in which he hosted a rap concert in Brooklyn. Continued his stand-up touring, including a run at Radio City Music Hall in 2014, while buffing up, although constant chain-smoking while performing indicated an ongoing self-destructive streak that remains at the heart of his acerbic wit. In 2017, he authored two specials for Netflix, showing his comedic presence is no longer filled with his acute observational sense, and instead is far more full of himself, as a show business personality. Inner: Genial, principled, addiction-prone, and sensitive to stereotyping. Extremely sharp-witted, taking great delight in puncturing the images of well-known black figures. Questing jester lifetime of taking his innate comedy genius to the next level as an astute commentator trying to keep a sense of perspective around excess fame and success and how it affects his own acute comedic sensibilities. dCurly Howard (Jerome Horowitz) (1903-1952) - American comedian. Outer: Of Lithuanian Jewish ancestry. Mother was a real estate entrepreneur and father was a clothing cutter. The youngest of 5 brothers, with siblings Moe and Shemp (Howie Mandel) becoming comedians. Called “Babe” by the family, which was later transmuted to “Curly,” through a misheard remark when he began his professional career. Quiet as a child, and a good athlete, as well as a dancer, he accidentally shot himself in the left ankle at 12, causing a slight limp, which he would employ in his subsequent exaggerated walking, since he was terrified of surgery to correct it. 5’5”. Never graduated high school, and did odd jobs, while watching his brothers stooge act for the angry and abusive Ted Healy (Sam Kinison), without participating in it. Originally red-haired with a waxed mustache. Entered show business as a comedy guest musical conductor, and quickly overshadowed his band, showing himself to be an extremely inventive comedian from the outset. In 1930, he married Julia Rosenthal in a brief union, which was undone by his constant fascination with the feminine, that was usually reciprocated. In 1932, he replaced his brother Shemp in the stooge trio, reluctantly shaving his head and mustache to do so. Shortly afterwards, his brother Moe, Larry Fine and he separated from Healy and redubbed themselves, “The Three Stooges,” and in 1934 began making shorts for Columbia Pictures, which would soon enshrine them in the comedic pantheon of the 20th century. Soon outshone the other two, with a childlike act and a verbal repertoire of “nyuk-nyuk-nyuk” and “woo-woo-woo,” among other expressions. Improvisational, he often would create routines with the camera rolling, so that by decade’s end, the trio had come up with a host of classic shorts. Off-screen, he proved quite the opposite of his manic self, needing alcohol to loosen up his otherwise reclusive character. Married a second time in 1937 to Elaine Ackerman, one daughter from the union, which ended in divorce 1940. The dissolution of his marriage caused a huge weight gain, and hypertension, thanks to a feeling of being extremely unattractive because of his shaved head, despite always being a magnet for the opposite gender. Continued making shorts and during WW II, the group constantly entertained service personnel, while he proved uncontrollable in his various appetites, and extremely childlike in his handling of his finances, with his brother Moe serving as a father figure and superego for him. His discomfort around his fellow humans would be assuaged with his great love for dogs, particularly strays, whom he would collect and find homes for, while touring. His lifestyle, however, resulted in a minor stroke as well as other physical ailments, although hardhearted studio chief Harry Cohn (Suge Knight) refused to allow him time to recover, as his work showed a decline in both energy and imagination. In 1945, he married Marion Buxbaum in yet another short-lived union of only three months. The publicity surrounding it caused him further deterioration, and his last dozen films showed him in steep decline, with the focus of the group’s antics now on Larry and Moe. In 1946, he suffered a major stroke, and moved to a motion picture rest home. His brother Shemp returned to the group to replace him, and he would only do two more brief cameo appearances, one of which was cut. In 1947, he married yet again to Valerie Newman, in what would prove his one union of true love, which produced a daughter, as well as a subsequent acting career for his wife. Suffered a massive stroke the following year, which left him paralyzed and wheelchair-bound. Had a third stroke in a nursing home in 1951, and also began declining mentally to complement his lost physicality. His brother refused to commit him to a mental hospital, and he wound up in a sanitarium, where he died of a massive cerebral hemorrhage. Inner: Rarely give interviews. Gullible and childlike, and easily seducible by one and all. Highly gifted in a number of spheres, including music, although completely undisciplined in everything he did. Unending childhood lifetime of give woo-woo-woo voice to his extraordinary comic sensibilities, only to ultimately self-destruct around his own imagined sense of frailty and failure.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS DOWN-TO-EARTH STAR:
Storyline: The bonhomie homey searches for beauty in the truth of her comic perceptions, while expanding her own horizons of possibility by taking a far more unconventional stairway to stardom.

dWhoopi Goldberg (Caryn Johnson) (1955) - American comedian, actress, writer and TV host. Outer: Of African-American descent. Raised by her mother, a nurse and Head Start teacher in the Chelsea section of NYC. Poor but never hungry as child. Acted in a children’s theater at 8, but fell into a self-destructive cycle of drugs as a teenager, including heroin, while dropping out of high school. 5’5”. Married at 18 to Alvin Martin, her drug counselor, daughter from union, divorced 5 years later. Did odd jobs, including hair and make-up at a funeral parlor, before heading for San Diego without her husband, and living on welfare. Later joined the Blake Street Hawkeyes Theater, where she changed her name, honoring whoopie cushions and a Jewish ancestor. Developed a one-woman show of brilliantly realized characterizations called “The Spook Show,” in her late 20s, and was discovered by director Mike Nichols, who brought her to Broadway, and her career took off. Made her film debut in 1985 in The Color Purple, for which she won a Golden Globe. In 1990, she won an Academy Reward as Best Supporting Actress for Ghost. Also appeared in the TV series “Star Trek: The Next Generation” as a psychic bartender. Briefly married again in her early 30s to David Claessen, a cinematographer, while slipping back into drugs for a while. Took up with actor Ted Danson, who left his wife and children for her. The duo got much flack when he appeared in blackface at a roast for her, and told offensive jokes they both wrote together. Married Lyle Trachtenberg, a union organizer in her late 30s, divorced a year later. Had her own syndicated talk show, although she was criticized for being too nice. An Academy Reward hostess in 2002, where her comments spurred considerable controversy, and frequent Comic Aid hostess, as well as commercial spokeswoman. Also did the Tonys that year. The busiest actress in Hollywood during the 1990s, appearing in 37 films, as well as serving as executive producer and center square for the popular TV show, “Hollywood Squares,” before eventually opting out when the syndicators couldn’t meet her mega-million dollar demands. A 5 year relationship with actor Frank Langella, whom she had earlier admired from afar, ended because of her excessive schedule. Won the prestigious Mark Twain Award for Humor in 2001. Launched an eponymous TV series in 2003, and a one-woman show on Broadway the following year, as well as a satellite radio show in 2006, to complete her sweep of the entertainment industry, as a high profile high-humored commentator on the American spirit, with an expressed desire in her latest outing to reintroduce manners to an unmannerly country. Is also one of a handful, and the only comedienne, to win an Oscar, Emmy, Tony and Grammy for her efforts. In 2007, she was chosen to replace Rosie O’Donnell on morning TV’s “The View.” At the same time, she announced she is retiring from acting, after more than 40 films, since she no longer receives scripts. A self-confessed info geek, she launched “Head Games,” in 2009, on the Science Channel, dedicated to trivia competition. In 2014, she eventually became the last woman standing on “The View” as her fellow opinionators were all fired in a clean custodial sweep following the retirement of Barbara Walters. As subsequent co-host with Rosie O’Donnell, she soon found herself at continual loggerheads with her around issues of personal power. When Rosie quit at the beginning of 2015, she lost her chance at a sitcom she had been planning to star in, since the network executives didn’t want her exiting the failing show. Launched her own medical marijuana business in 2016, a literal joint partnership with award-winning edibles maker Maya Elisabeth. The company will sell pot-infused salves and edibles aimed at helping relieve the pain of menstrual cramps. At the same time, she announced, she doesn’t want to work as hard anymore, while engaged in contentious contract negotiations for “The View,” as well as continual clashes with her conservative co-host, Jedediah Bila, a Donald Trump supporter. Has a net worth of $45 million. Inner: Candid, honest, earthy and perceptive. Believer in ghosts, feels the spirit of comedienne Moms Mabley behind her. Harbors a fear of flying, despite being quite fearless in all other realms. Sharp-tongued lifetime born of humble beginnings in order to deepen her cutting observations on the human comedy. dFlora Finch (1869-1940) - English/American comedian. Outer: From a music hall and traveling theatrical family. Began her career as a Shakespearean actress and had a respected stage career in London, and also appeared on the American vaudeville circuit. 5’9,” thin and hatchet-faced. Made her film debut in 1908 with Mrs. Jones Entertains. Came to Hollywood in her mid-40s, and became part of the first successful comedy team in silent film his/story when she hooked up with comic John Bunny (John Goodman) for a series of over 250 shorts, in which she played the slim, excitable counterfoil to her round, drunken, philandering husband. After he died at the height of their fame together, she continued doing shorts, after forming her own Flora Finch Film Company, although couldn’t find an audience for herself as a single. Married. She also appeared on stage and did bit parts, but slowly faded into oblivion, unable to maintain her career. Made 74 films all told. Retired in 1939 and died of rheumatic fever brought on by a streptococcus infection the following year. Inner: Good-humored, eccentric. Cross-cultural lifetime of beginning as a serious actress, before finding her true metier in a low comedy partnership, only to flounder on her own when it terminated, giving her the impetus to create a more integrated sense of career via hardship and high humor to transcend it, the next go-round in this series.

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PATHWAY OF THE COMEDIAN AS MORDANT POET TURNED CUTTING WIT:
Storyline: The former quasi-effete esthete learns how to look at things through a humorous prism after taking everything far too seriously in his previous go-round, much to his personal detriment.

David Sedaris (David Raymond Sedaris) (1956) - American humorist, writer and comedian. Outer: Of Greek descent on his paternal side and British and Scottish on his mother’s, Father was an IBM engineer and belonged to the Greek Orthodox Church. Mother was Protestant. Second oldest of six, with one brother and four sisters, including Amy Sedaris, an actress, writer and comedian with whom he would work, and Tiffany, who committed suicide in 2013, because of a bipolar disorder. Mother was an alcoholic with a dual personality, happy and joke-filled at times and raw and angry when drunk, creating an extremely volatile relationship with his father and an unstable home-life. Lost her in 1991. Grew up in a suburb of Raleigh, North Carolina. 5’5” and brown-haired. Briefly attended Western Carolina Univ., before transferring to Kent State and then dropping out from there as well to move to Chicago in 1987. Did odd jobs, while working the comedy club circuit, where he was discovered by a radio host, who put him on his local Chicago show, “The Wild Room.” That led to his national debut on NPR’s “Morning Edition,” reading a tale about working as an elf clad in green tights for Macy’s. Began appearing monthly on the show reading segments from his diary, and built up a loyal following, which supported his published efforts and his status as an unusual observer of the human condition. Received numerous awards for humor, including becoming the third recipient of the Thurber Prize in 2001, and being named Time magazine’s “Humorist of the Year” at the same time. Created “The Talent Family” with his sister Amy, penning a number of plays with her., which have been produced at a number of NYC venues. The author of a host of books, including 1994’s “Barre; Fever” and 1997’s “Holidays on Ice” as well as collections of personal essays, while also a frequent guest on a variety of talk shows. Lived in Normandy with his partner, painter Hugh Hamrick, who also appears in some of his essays, and began working for the BBC, which occasioned his moving to the UK, in what seemed like a very logical decision, while maintaining apartments in both countries. Has a net worth of $2 million. Inner: Sardonic wit and incisive social critic, thanks in part to reacting to the various dramas thrust on him by an unstable mother. Uses his own life as the primary source of his material, since it is rich in incident. Self-deprecating lifetime of dealing with the problems of growing up in an unstable household through wit, rather than mordant introspection, opening himself up considerably in the process. Lord Alfred Douglas (Lord Alfred Bruce Douglas) (1870-1945) - British writer, poet, translator and political commentator. Outer: From an old warrior Scottish family, with numerous colorful ancestors. Father was John Douglas, the 9th Marquess of Queensberry, with whom he always had a strained relationship. Mother was a noted beauty. One of five children, with two older brothers and a younger brother and sister. Third son and his mother’s favorite, dubbing him “Bosie” a nickname he would carry the rest of his life. Raised on a West Coventry country estate called Kinnmount, giving him a bucolic childhood, His progenitor was often absent during his early growing up, and he admired him from afar, although this proved illusory. When he was 10, his father moved the family to London. His parent’s marriage ended with his sire’s adulterous and threatening behavior, when his mother sued him for divorce. Educated at Winchester College, which he initially found nightmarish and Magdalen College, Oxford, although left in 1893, sans degree. By this time he saw himself as a homophile, thanks to much schoolboy activity in that realm. Edited “The Spirit Lamp,” an esthetic, literary and critical magazine at the latter, which incensed his paterfamilias. In 1891, he met the noted wit and playwright Oscar Wilde (Joe Orton), and the two embarked on an affair, despite Wilde’s being married at the time. Proved rather reckless, spoiled and extravagant, with other relationships as well, so that the two were an on and off couple. Translated one of his plays from the French to the English, although his skills with language were poor. His father saw their relationship in the darkest of terms, and in 1895 left a card at Wilde’s club accusing him of being a “somdomite.” Supported Wilde’s suit of his sire in a subsequent trial, which ultimately found the playwright guilty and sentenced to two years at head labor. On his release, Wilde went to Rouen and the two reunited, living there and in Naples, before permanently separating. Returned to the UK alone in 1898. Following Wilde’s death two years later, he formed a relationship with Olive Eleanor Custance, a bisexual poet and heiress, and the duo wed in 1902. One son from the union, who wound up in a mental hospital. Converted to Roman Catholicism in 1911, which did not sit well with his wife, and the duo separated two years later. She would later convert as well, and the two briefly got together again, before permanently separating but never divorcing. When Wilde’s “De Profundis” letter was published in 1911, limning their homosexual relationship, he turned on his former lover. Wrote for journals and poetry all during this time. In 1920 he founded a right-wing, Catholic, Judeophobe weekly called “Plain English.”” Wound up the subject of several libel cases, and was sentenced to six months in Wormwood Scrubs prison, paralleling Wilde’s earlier fall from grace. Wrote his last major poetic work while there, although he was not allowed to take it with him when he was released, and had to reconstruct it from memory, while claiming his health had been broken by the conditions of his incarceration, once again aping Wilde. The ordeal softened his earlier hostility to the playwright, as he slipped into relative poverty, supported by friends and his abiding Catholic faith. An active letter writer, as well as strongly opinionated about the talents of other scriveners, he also gave lectures, as a well-known figure in the UK’s literary community. Died of congestive heart failure, and was buried alongside his mother, with a single gravestone covering both. Published several books of poetry, an autobiography and two tomes on Wilde, along with his other editing work Inner: Contentious, and confrontational while filled with a host of prejudices, as he curiously paralleled several elements in the life of his most famous inamorata. Spent much of existence trying to regain the godly innocence of childhood. Highly dramatic lifetime of both trying to undo and recapture elements of his past, before returning in far better humored spirits the next time around in this series.


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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS BIG-HEARTED FUNNY GIRL:
Storyline: The hearty healer employs laughter as her own best medicine, while eschewing intimacy with males, after a go-round of extreme disappointments with them, in order to take total control over her emotional life, and realize her full power as a woman and a cultural force unto herself.

dEllen DeGeneres (Ellen Lee DeGeneres) (1958) - American comedienne and talkshow host. Outer: Of French, Irish, German and English descent. Mother was a real estate agent, and father was an insurance salesman. One brother, Vance, who became an actor and rock’n’roll guitarist. Raised in a largely non-communicative and fear-filled home, which inhibited her. Originally a Christian Scientist. When she was 16, her parents divorced, and she tried to countervail her mother’s immense sadness over it by continually trying to make her laugh. Harbored a desire to be a singer-songwriter, but was innately shy, despite having a great desire to be famous. After her mother remarried another salesman, the family moved to Texas, where she went to high school. 5’7” and slim, with blonde hair and blue eyes. Went to the Univ. of New Orleans for a semester, where she studied communications, before dropping out, to become a paralegal. Realized well beforehand that she was attracted to her own gender, and came out to her mother when she was 20, much to the latter’s initial shock, but kept that side of herself hidden from everyone else. Did a whole variety of jobs, including painting houses, shucking oysters, and tending bar, before turning to standup comedy, tuning her sharp-honed wit and sense of observation to everyday elements. Paid her dues for several years in small clubs and coffeehouses, gradually building up a following, which allowed her to tour nationally. In 1982, she was named “The Funniest Person in America,” by the cable network Showtime, after a series of regional competitions. Eschewed negativity and mean-spirited put-downs for upbeat commentary, although inwardly felt she wasn’t really being honest with who she really was. Did some filmwork in supporting roles, although her most natural medium would soon prove to be TV. Became the first female comedian on “The Johnny Carson Show,” to be invited over to the couch following her act, in a rare tribute to her abilities. After appearing in supporting roles in a pair of short-lived sitcoms, she was rewarded with her own series in 1994, which came to be known as “Ellen.” Hosted the Grammys in the mid-1990s, and in 1997, both she and her character publicly came out to much publicity, although the show subsequently went overboard on her newly revealed status, and it was canceled the next season for lack of viewer interest, because of its obsessive one-note comedy. Returned to the standup circuit and was able to maintain her career afterwards with no ill effects, with a concert tour, a book and film voiceover work in Finding Nemo. Had a high profile relationship with actress Anne Heche, which ended in similarly public manner three and a half years later, but rebounded as hostess of the Emmy Awards in 2001, in the difficult aftermath of 9/11 and America’s invasion of Afghanistan. Able to triumphantly make light of the dark atmosphere, although unable to transliterate it into a second try at a sitcom, where her character was openly same-sex from the outset. Her Emmy appearance, however, ultimately let to an eponymous talkshow in 2003, which proved to be her true métier. Won 15 Emmys in her first three seasons, including an unprecedented three in a row for Outstanding Talk Show, and the show has gone on to become a staple of daytime television. Sings and dances with both her guests and audiences, and for thirty-year high school class reunion, flew the entire class out to California for the show. After a four year relationship with photographer-director Alexandra Hedison, she became involved with actress Portia de Rossi in 2004, whom she married in 2008. Hosted the Emmys again after the Hurricane Katrina disaster, and in 2007, reached a comic pinnacle by being tapped to host the Oscars to general critical applause. Made tabloid headlines later that year in a tearful plea for the return of a puppy she adopted and then gave away contra her agreement, leading to death threats for the rule-bound agency who had retrieved the animal, and an avowal on her part not to involve the volatile public in her private affairs again, because of the extraordinary power of television. In 2008, she was made a spokesmodel for Covergirl cosmetics, in a precedent-setting move by the giant company, which usually employs much younger exemplars of its beauty ideals. The following year, she was added to the judge’s bench on “American Idol,” replacing Paula Abdul, although only lasted a season feeling it wasn’t a good fit for her. At the same time she formed her own record label, eleveneleven. Won the prestigious Mark Twain Award for Humor in 2012 and in 2016 she was given the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor. Has a net worth of $360 million and an annual salary of $75 million. Inner: Extremely sensitive, and largely nonpolitical, with a great desire to make people happy. Do-over lifetime of integrating her public ability to entertain with her private emotional life, in a far more satisfactory go-round of bringing the both sides of herself comfortably together. dFanny Brice (Fania Borach) (1891-1951) - American comedian and singer. Outer: Of Jewish descent. Father was Alsatian, mother was Hungarian. Her sire owned several saloons, which her mother helped to run. 3rd of 4 children. Although she was raised in middle-class splendor, replete with servants, she liked to have people feel sorry for her. At 10 her parents separated, and she moved with her mother and siblings to Brooklyn. With her younger brother, she used to tearfully ask directions to go home to Brooklyn at Coney Island and would be rewarded with subway fare, which they would use to have a good time. Sang for pennies in saloons, won a $10 prize in a Brooklyn amatur contest at 13 and was a professional at 14, earning $30 a week in amateur contests, while appearing in light stage shows. 5’7”, 130 pounds, and red-haired, with a long, narrow face. Changed her name to Brice when she embarked upon the stage fulltime, rising from the chorus line to featured singer and dancer by 1909. Did Jewish dialect comedy on both vaudeville and in burlesque, while singing novelty numbers. Used a high-pitched falsetto for her comic songs, while her natural voice was low and emotional. Married Frank White, a barber at 18, but they separated after only three days, and divorced in 1913. Homely but high-energy, she made her first appearance in the Ziegfeld Follies when she was 18, and starred in all but 2 of them over the next 13 years, when she signed with the rival Shuberts. Did impressions and memorable comedy routines, parodying both vamps and ballet dancers alike. In 1919, she married gambler and con man Nicky Arnstein, who went to jail before their marriage for two years and during it for another two in 1924 and 1925, after being convicted of taking Wall Street for over $5 million in securities. A daughter and a son from the union, which was initially interrupted and redone when it was discovered that Arnstein’s first marriage was not officially over. Divorced him in 1927 on charges of adultery and married diminutive showman Billy Rose, 2 years later. Divorced him a little less than a decade following for his compulsive unfaithfulness. Appeared sporadically in films, beginning with My Man in her late 30s. Developed her signature character, Baby Snooks, on Broadway in her mid-40s, and rode it for the rest of her career, becoming a popular radio figure with its vaudeville humor, beginning in her mid-50s. Was planning on translating the oversized infant character to TV, but died of a cerebral hemorrhage before she could. Immortalized in celluloid in Funny Girl, where she was played by Barbra Streisand. The film was produced by her son-in-law, Ray Stark. Also an an artist, designer and decorator. Inner: Honest, candid, truthful, extremely generous. Had a great fascination with people. Unfortunate self-epigram was, ‘I never loved a man I liked and never liked a man I loved.’ Choice-challenged lifetime of poor selections in partners, while exhibiting a great heart and an exuberant talent, which would make her turn to her own sex the next time around, while expanding into the talk-show realm, giving her greater and more direct access to her audience.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS INDIGNANT CLOWN:
Storyline: The hardy foil helps create a classic screen partnership then goes it alone in rediscovering the unpartnered actor and comic within, in a career geared towards exploring his singular performing abilities.

dOliver Platt (1960) - American actor. Outer: Father was in the diplomatic service. Raised in Asia, Africa and Washington, D.C. Middle of 3 brothers. Distantly related to both Princess Diana and Orson Welles. 6’3 1/2”. Educated at Tufts Univ., with a major in drama, then trained at Shakespeare & Co. Appeared on and off-Broadway, on TV and in films, as a secondary player in a variety of both comedy and drama, before finally teaming up with Stanley Tucci, his crypto-pastlife partner, in The Imposters, to try to unconsciously recreate the same alchemy they had earlier achieved, although it never found its audience. Married Camille Campbell in 1993, two daughters and a son from the union. Continues, like his former parter, to work in both comedy and drama, with an emphasis on the former, once more playing with a large frame, although without the temperamental fuse that ignited the laughter the duo so easily elicited. In 2000, he was given the starring role in the TV melodrama, “Deadline,” which was soon cancelled. Continued his TV fare, filmwork and the theater, as a highly dependable character actor, with a great desire to constantly amplify his craft. Nominated for a Tony in 2006 for his work in “Shining City.” Found a character much to his liking in Dr. Daniel Charles, the chief of psychiatry on the popular “Chicago Med,” in 2015, for a multi-season run. Inner: Good-natured and agile. Expanding lifetime, like his former partner, of stretching his abilities in various directions, while maintaining the same large body and a more even-tempered approach to both comedy and drama, and keeping the same first name as an unconscious link to the past. dOliver Hardy (Norvell Hardy) (1892-1957) - American comedian. Outer: Father was a prominent lawyer and Confederate Civil War veteran who died when his son was 10 months old. Expected to follow in his professional footsteps. Had little interest in school and began singing professionally at 8 with a minstrel show, then appeared in stock as well as forming his own singing act, touring the South with it. Known as “Babe” his entire life, because of his boyish looks. Went to the Univ. of Georgia, but dropped out and opened a small movie theater in his late teens. 6’1” and lover 300 pounds. In his early 20s, he joined the Lubin company in Jacksonville, Florida, as a supporting player, playing villains in one and two reel comedies, then support to a string of popular comic silent stars, as well as serving as a gagwriter. Married Madelyn Saloshin, a concert pianist, in 1913 and divorced in 1920. Made his first film, the aptly titled, Outwitting Dad in 1914. Did a bit part in 1917 in a vehicle in which his future partner, Stan Laurel (Stanley Tucci) starred, although the two would not be put together for nearly another decade. Married actress Myrtle Lee Reeves in 1921, in an unpleasant union which saw his wife become an alcoholic, divorced 16 years later. Corpulent, with a faux dignity, which made him a perfect villainous foil, but his movie roles were largely secondary, and his true talents were largely wasted, until he went to work for producer Hal Roach in 1926, and director Leo McCrary teamed him up with Laurel, seeing the comic potential of their opposite physicalities. Less creative than his partner, he, nevertheless, played off of him perfectly, using his comic sense of dignity and exasperation to register outrage at the escalating difficulties their lame-brained partnership always managed to create out of the simplest of situations. Laurel & Hardy became the most successful comic team that the first century of films produced, and the duo went on to do some 100 shorts and features together, although they parted ways with the Roach company in 1940, looking to gain more control over their material through working with some of the major studios. Quite the opposite happened, and by 1945, they had run their course. Contracted his last marriage in 1940 to Virginia Lucille Jones, in what would be his only satisfying union. No children from any of his couplings. Made two tours of British music halls in 1947 and 1954, and tried one European venture which failed miserably. Had a heart attack in 1955, and subsequently halved his weight to 150 lbs, although never stopped smoking. While planning a comeback in a color film, he suffered a massive cerebral thrombosis from which he never recovered, falling into a coma for several weeks and dying from its aftereffects, leaving his former partner bereft and unable ever to perform again. Inner: Warm, kind, generous, quite the opposite of his short-fused screen persona, with a deep love for his partner, which was felt in return. Perfect foil lifetime, like Laurel, of finding his ideal performing partner and creating with him a classic oeuvre that transcended its time.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS SHARP-WITTED DIMWIT:
Storyline: The fey foole creates a classic character in partnership, then delves deeper into his theatrical sensibilities for a far more well-rounded career in the dual callings of both comedy and drama.

dStanley Tucci (1960) - American actor, writer, director and producer. Outer: Both parents were of Italian descent. Father was an art teacher, mother was a secretary. Eldest of three, with two younger sisters, including Christine who became an actress. . Educated at SUNY, where he majored in drama. 5’6”, slim and balding. Had his first acting job on Broadway in 1982, with “The Queen and the Rebels,” and has been working nonstop ever since. Began his film career in 1987 in Who’s That Girl, and went on to play mostly saturnine villains, before finally realizing his ambitions for both writing and directing, as well as starring. In 1995, he married Kate Spath a social worker, 3 children, including twins from the union, as well as raising two others from her previous marriage. The same year, he scored a surprise hit as an independent filmmaker with Big Night, as co-writer, co-director and star. Teamed up afterwards with Oliver Platt to create the 1930s farce, The Imposters, unconsciously tapping into the Laurel & Hardy magic they managed to co-create at roughly the same age. The film drew comparisons with the earlier duo in its attempt at re-exploring classic screwball comedy, although never found its audience. Continues to explore his various hyphenated talents, on stage as well as in film, rather than settling for a singular classic character as he previously had done, with a notable star turn on Broadway in “Frankie and Johnny,” where he became involved for a year with his co-star Edie Falco, before trying to make amends with his marriagem which ended afterwards with the death of his wife from breast cancer. Also part owner of a successful restaurant in upstate, New York. In 2006, he took on a TV series starring role as a brain surgeon on “3 Lbs,” only to be immediately canceled for low ratiings. Nominated for several awards, and won an Emmy in 1999 for “Winchell,” while also appearing in several hiigh profile films after the century’s turn, most notably The Lovely Bones and The Hunger Games. Directed a Broadway revival, and remains more in demand than ever, following his turning 50, on both the large and small screen. Married Felicity Blunt, a literary agent some two decades his junior, and sister of actress Emily Blunt in 2012, one son from the union. In 2017, he did a hilarious turn as producer Jack Warner on the cable series, “Feud”. Has a net worth of over $18 million. Inner: Modest, focused, warm-hearted. Stretch lifetime of expanding his abilities considerably from the beloved dimwit character he had earlier created into a much more rounded entertainment force, while, like his former partner, maintaining the same first name as an unconscious link to the past. dStan Laurel (Arthur Stanley Jefferson) (1890-1965) - English/American comedian. Outer: Mother was an actress, father was a combination actor/director/producer/playwright. 2nd son of 4 sons and a daughter. Made his stage debut at 16 as a boy comedian in Glasgow, Scotland, and then spent the rest of his teens working in British theater and music halls, playing the gamut from drama to comedy, while also clowning and dancing. 5’10”, 150 lbs. Joined the Fred Karno company at 20 and became Charlie Chaplin’s understudy in their first American tour that year. When the company returned 2 years later, he served in the same role, and then stayed behind in America to work in vaudeville under the name he would henceforth be known by. Began his film career in 1917 in Nuts in May, and then did some 76 shorts and silents, including a turn in Lucky Dog in which he starred, and an unknown named Oliver Hardy (Oliver Platt) played a bit part. Played a clown in oversized clothing who was a total societal misfit in his early screen outings, while continuing his vaudeville career. Wrote many of his early comedy routines, as well as co-directed, often spoofing popular films of the time. Had a common-law marriage with actress Mae Dahlberg, who was married to another actor at the time, from 1919-1925. His 2nd marriage to actress Lois Nielsen was from 1926-1935. Signed a contract in 1926 as a writer/director, but returned to acting, and the following year, he began his prolific partnership with Oliver Hardy, which would redefine screen comedy. The duo played off their opposing physicality, with the short-tempered Hardy in constant exasperation over his partner’s dim-witted, head-scratching, oblique, weeping approach to all their self-created problems. Appeared in more than 100 films together, including 27 features. Wrote most of them with a team of writers, after producer Hal Roach came up with the initial idea. Briefly married a third time to actress Virginia Ruth Rogers, between 1935 and 1936, and a fourth time to fiery Russian opera singer Vera Shuvalova from 1938-1939, although his real emotional union was with Hardy. Began in conjunction with producer Hal Roach, working under his aegis until 1940, when the duo decided they needed more freedom, although they received considerably less money under the larger studios, and finally ended their film collaboration in 1945, with one final unfunny effort in 1950. Remarried his earlier wife Ruth Rogers from 1941-1946, and his final marriage was in 1946 to Ida Kitaeva, which produced his only child. Became a diabetic, and suffered a stroke in 1955, although recovered from it. Toured the British Isles with a music hall revue after WW II, and made another tour in 1954. Although they planned a comeback in color films, Hardy suffered a stroke and never recovered from it, dying in 1957. Absolutely devastated by his death, he refused to perform again, although he continued as a comedy writer. In 1961, he was given a Lifetime Achievement Oscar, and made one of his few public appearances to accept it. Died at home of a heart attack. Inner: Despite his screen character, quite the opposite, a perceptive clown with a brilliant sense of character who understood completely the rhythms of classic comedy. Warmhearted, modest, well-loved, with a deep connection to his brother of the screen. Personally answered every single piece of fan mail he received. Perfect chemistry lifetime of finding his ideal foil to create an undying body of work that will live as long as film comedy does.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS CHARMING CHAMELEON:
Storyline: The uncanny mimic easily slips into imitative characters, but never loses her central sense of self in the process, creating a series of successful careers dedicated to the proposition that flattery is the sincerest form of imitation.

dTracey Ullman (1959) - English/American comedienne. Outer: Mother was of Gypsy descent. Father had been a Polish soldier, who served as a translator among the post WW II displaced Polish community, while doing a variety of jobs. One older sister. While reading a bedtime story to his daughter, he had a heart attack and died. Developed a need to uplift and entertain after the loss and was encouraged by her mother to perform in front of adults. Felt she was ‘an ugly child,’ with her singular redeeming feature being able to slip into dozens of different personalities through her adeptness at mimicry, including friends, neighbors and family members. As a teenager, she attended the Italia Conti Stage School in London on scholarship, then worked as a dancer, going as far afield as Berlin, where she appeared in “Gigi.” Had her first breakthrough playing a born-again Christian nightclub singer in the play “Four in a Million.” Through her award-winning performance, she gained a TV series, “Three of a Kind,’ in which she did parodies and impersonations, making her a big British star. Made her film debut in 1983 in Give My Regards to Broad Street, and also launched a successful singing and recording career, which enabled her to cross the Atlantic and enter American TV. Married Allan McKeown, a producer, in 1983, daughter and son from the union. Launched the eponymous, “The Tracey Ullman Show,” in 1987, which ran for 3 seasons, as a half-hour sketch comedy in which she played several different characters each show, utilizing her miming, singing, dancing and acting abilities. Immersed herself in American culture, picking up accents and peculiarly American peccadilloes, although the demands of the show made her curtail it. Made her American movie debut in 1991 with I Love You to Death, and has continued in comedies, although TV remains her primary medium. Had her own cable show, “Tracey Takes on,” for three years in the late 1990s on the American side of the Atlantic, where she continued as a unique impressionistic figure, able to imbue her various characterizations with both her comic perceptions and her uncanny capacity for catching the essence and accent of her portrayals. Won 7 Emmys all told for her TV efforts. Became an American citizen in 2006, while still maintaining a home in London. Wrote a best-selling knitting book, called “Knit 2 Together,” while her various endeavors made her Britain’s wealthiest comedienne, with a net worth estimated at some £75 million. In 2008, she inaugurated yet another eponymous show, “Tracey Ullman’s State of the Union,” finding American culture and personalities an endless source of material, for her increasingly sharper sense of observation. Resurrected her eponymous show in 2016, to excellent effect, while also appearing as an actress in other TV fare. Inner: Inexhaustible store of voice impressions, with a highly pliable face, allowing her to remold herself into anyone she wishes to be. Mirror, mirror on the wall lifetime of continuing her exploration of her singular abilities at imitation, allowing her to once again fashion a highly successful career around her unique talents, while searching for herself amidst the many manifestation she projects. dMarie Tempest (Mary Etherington) (1864-1942) - English singer and comedienne. Outer: Father was the illegitimate son of a solider, who became an improvident alcoholic who worked as a stationer, mother was the daughter of a draper. After her parents went their separate ways, she was raised by her maternal grandmother, who had married a servant. The latter later presented herself as an aristocrat, although her knowledge of society was second hand, gleaned from her husband’s labors. Educated in a Belgium Ursuline convent, via her mysterious grandfather, which made her fluent in French, then studied music in Paris and at the Royal Academy of Music in London. Made her operatic debut in 1855 in “Bocaccio,” then toured the U.S. and Canada for 4 years afterwards, as well as all over the world. Sung in comic opera for the first 15 years of her career. Had a fetching stage personality, a winsome face and a fine singing and speaking voice. In 1885, she married Alfred Izard, a student pianist, divorced 4 years later. One son from the union. The same year, she married Cosmo Stuart, the grandson of a duke, who wrote one of her most popular comedies, “The Marriage of Miss Kitty,” 2 children from union. In 1900, she renounced musicals and spent the rest of her career as a comedienne, playing well-bred, sharp-tongued matrons. In 1914, she embarked on a nine year worldwide tour. After the death of her husband in 1921, she married William Graham Browne, a producer and actor the following year, and he served as his constant adviser the rest of his life. The duo also appeared together on stage. Her later career allowed her to make fun of the earlier Victorian vehicles that established her career. In 1935, she celebrated her golden jubilee on the stage, with none other than the king and queen in attendance. The performance raised £5000 towards an eponymous ward at a London hospital. Absolutely devastated by her husband’s death in 1937. Made a Dame of the British Empire in at the same time. Afterwards, her memory began failing, and she felt totally alienated from the world at life’s end. Inner: Sprightly comic, elegant and compulsively neat. More a creature of disciplined than natural talent. Footlit lifetime of neatly dividing her career in twain, giving her youth to singing, and her maturity to matronly comedy, while proving an audience favorite over a 50 year period.

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PATHWAY OF THE COMEDIAN AS IN-YOUR-FACE CONTROVERSIALIST:
Storyline: The confrontational comic deliberately creates chaos around herself, after earlier playing it stereotypically safe to insure audience love.

Kathy Griffin (Kathleen Mary Griffin) (1960) - American comedian, actress, writer producer and TV hostess. Outer: Of Irish descent. Father was an electronic store manager, mother was a hospital administrator. Youngest of five with three brothers and a sister. Often teased when she was younger because of her bright red hair and freckles, but quickly learned to respond to taunts. Raised Catholic, but largely irreligious. Appeared on stage for high school productions, before going to Triton Junior College in Illinois for a semester. 5’4” and slim, with red hair and green eyes. Decided to seriously pursue a show biz career and moved to LA, to study acting at the Lee Strasberg Theatre Institute, then joined the Groundlings comedy troupe. Made her film debut in 1994 in Pulp Fiction in a bit part, and two years later appeared on the TV sitcom “Suddenly Susan,”. for its four season run. Created her own one-woman show, “Cup of Chat” which led to a cable comedy special in 1995, and then appeared whenever and wherever she could on the small screen. Had her breakthrough in 2005 with the reality TV series, “Kathy Griffin: My Life on the D-List” winning two Emmys for Outstanding Reality Program for the show, which ran through 2010. On accepting the award in 2007, she ruffled feathers by claiming, "Suck it, Jesus, this award is my God now!” During that time, she also released her first comedy album, “For Your Consideration” in 2008, and the following annum penned her autobiography, “A Memoir According to Kathy Griffin” which became a best-seller. In 2007, she began co-hosting CNN’s New Year’s Eve special. Formed Inappropriate Laughter, a TV production company, and holds the record for the highest number of specials on cable TV. In 2013 she won a Grammy for Best Comedy Album, for her sixth , “Calm Down Gurl.” Had her own late night talk show, “Kathy” which ran for two seasons, beginning in 2012. Hosted the 41st daytime Emmy Awards in 2014 to general applause, Has had a checkered personal life, in keeping with her need to garner as much publicity as possible for her various efforts. In 2001, she married composer/technician Matthew Moline, who was 14 years her junior. The childless union ended when she discovered he had stolen $72,000 from her bank account during their five years of less than wedded bliss. Divorced in 2006. Has had a goodly number of relationship with a host of diverse men, and is an activist for the GLBT community. In 2017, she created considerable controversy by appearing with a mock-up of Pres. Donald Trump’s severed head. Received considerable rebuke for the ploy and initially apologized before rescinding her apology. Lost her New Year’s Eve co-hosting gig over it, although was cleared on any federal charges for the ill-thought out prank, and remains a comedy pariah in some circles, while having several highly public contentious relationships with show business people. Later that year she shaved her head in support of her sister Joyce’s battle with cancer. Has a net worth of $20 million. Inner: Shameless self-promoter, with a great desire to be constantly in the public eye, Unafraid of both mocking herself and other celebrities. Obsessed with her weight and looks, with numerous plastic surgery procedures. In your face lifetime of deliberately being a provocateur, after her earlier go-round of playing to prejudices and stereotypes in order to make herself as nonthreatening as possible. Tess Gardella (Therese Gardella) (1894-1950) - American vaudeville comedian and singer. Outer: Of Italian descent. Large-bodied and short, she began singing at social functions in her native town, before coming to NYC around 1918, putting on blackface and calling herself Aunt Jemima as a caricature on the vaudeville stage. Proved a quick audience favorite, while maintaining her stereotypical character, at a time of deliberate racial divides. Played Queenie, a cook, in the original 1927 Broadway production of "Show Boat”, as the only white performer wearing blackface in the cast. All of her film appearances in the 1930s, were as the same ‘mammy’ character. In the 1940s, she had the lead role on the "Aunt Jemima" radio program, which featured her singing and giving cooking tips. Her final performance was at the Palace in its 1949 vaudeville revival, before dying of diabetes the following year. Although her grave marker bore the name "Aunt Jemima” she is not considered the real Aunt Jemima according to the African American Registry, but is widely accepted for her contributions to the character's successful use for product sales and commercials. Inner: One note lifetime of finding a nonthreatening character and continually playing it, without challenging herself or her audience, which she would totally redress her next go-around in this series.


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PATHWAY OF THE ENTERTAINER AS KINGFISH TURNED COMIC HOST:
Storyline: The sly satirist turns from broad comedy one go-round to incisive social commentary the next, while focusing on all aspects of his existence, in order to redress his earlier failure to give himself a fully well-rounded life.

Larry Wilmore (Elster Larry Wilmore) (1961) - American satirist, writer, producer, actor and TV host. Outer: Of African-American descent. Family was originally from Illinois. Father was a probation officer who decided to switch careers at 40 and ultimately became a doctor. Third of six children, with two older sisters, a younger brother Marc, who also became an actor, TV writer and producer, and another younger brother, as well as a younger sister. Went to an all-male Catholic high school, where he was class president and played sports, as well as being on the debate team, then studied theater at Cal State Polytechnic Univ. before dropping out to become a stand-up comic and pursue acting. Had small roles in a couple of TV series, before receiving his first big break in 1990 with a writing job on the Rick Dees talk show “Into the Night”, then parlayed that into writing for “In :Living Color,” which launched a host of comic careers. Had a number of writing creditors afterwards, and in 1995 married Leilani Jones, an actress four years his senior. Son and daughter from the union. Along with Eddie Murphy, he co-created “The PJs,” an animated series, in 1999, which had a 3 season run. His next creation, “The Bernie Mac Show” ran for five seasons beginning in 2001, and brought him an Emmy in 2002 for Outstanding Writer for a Comedy Series. Also served as producer for several hits during the 1990s, and would continue as such after century’s turn, appearing several times on the mockumentary “The Office,” as well as playing doctors on a pair of shows, with most of his acting performed in TV series. Became “The Daily Show”’s senior black correspondent in 2006, gaining a following for his astute commentary on politics, culture and sports. Did some film work including Dinner for Schmucks in 2010 and appeared twice in the TV series “Love Bites” the following annum, which got him a Showtime special. Also found time to author “I’d Rather We Got Casinos and Other Black Thoughts.” In early 2015, he got his own late night talk show on Comedy Central, “The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore” taking over the slot vacated by Stephen Colbert, on Martin Luther King’s birthday, irony intended. Followed a format of an opening monologue post-ceded by a discussion he moderates with a panel that includes at least one comic. At the same time, his 20 year marriage ended, creating both a high and low for him simultaneously. Unafraid to take on big subjects, and, once again, he has showed himself to be a witty presence on a medium often referred to as a wasteland. Used the term “my nigga" for Obama affectionately at the 2016 White House correspondent’s dinner, causing an uproar among the very people who generally employ it in derogatory fashion. Ultimately felt it would open a new dialogue between whites and blacks, and was largely unapologetic about his performance, which took on stone-faced others in the room as well. After 19 months, Comedy Central decided to end his show, and he bowed out graciously, calling it the unblackening of late night talk, while some critics carped, the show just wasn’t funny enough with its over-emphasis on race relations in the U.S. Returned to the small screen soon after, as producer, co-creator and writer of the cable series, “Insecure” with comedian Issa Rae, using her popular web series about a young black woman in Los Angeles, “Awkward Black Girl,” as its basis. Inked a new deal afterwards with ABC Studios, giving him latitude to work on his own projects, assist on others and look for new talent. Has a net worth of $3 million. Inner: Feels a strong kinship to Jewish comedy. Always compartmentalized things so as to be part of a host of different groups. Considers himself a recovering Catholic and church-goer. Off-to-the-races lifetime of bringing his sly sensibilities to the social, cultural and political mix of post-modern American existence as a caustic commentator looking to expand the way the U.S. view itself. Tim Moore (Harry Roscoe Moore) (1887-1958) - American comedian, boxer and writer. Outer: Of African-American descent. Father was night watchman at a brewery. One of 15 children. Dropped out of grammar school at 11 to do odd jobs, including dancing in the streets for pennies. Teamed with childhood friend Romeo Washburn for a vaudeville act with Irish vaudevillian Cora Miskel called “Cora Miskel and Her Gold Dust Twins,” which toured the U.S. and Europe. On his return, he joined a medicine show that played vacant lots around the mid-west, then became a jockey followed by a prizefighter, under the name of Kid Noble. Began as a featherweight and wound up as a middleweight, fighting over 100 bouts and winning about 80 of them. In 1908, he went 27 rounds in a fight he lost, which occasioned his return to the stage. Penned all of his own material, as well as skits for other performers. Did a one man show of “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” with half of his face in white chalk and half in burnt cork, turning his face to the audience as he did the opposing characters of Simon Legree and Uncle Tom. Married Hester, a singer, and created a vaudeville act as well as a stock company with her that toured the world. After divorcing in 1915, he remarried a second time to a vaudeville actress named Gertrude, and toured with her, before producing “Tim Moore’s Chicago Follies,” a black musical which played the chitlin circuit from 1921 to 1925. Did a silent film comedy and then appeared on Broadway in a number of plays. His wife died in 1934, and he married a third time to Benzonia Davis in 1941. He was about to retire, when the role he would be best known for, George ‘Kingfish” Stevens, on the “Amos’n’Andy” TV show beckoned in 1951, in which he played a trickster always looking to lure Andy into get rich quick schemes. His catchphrase, “Holy mackerel,” would enter the American lexicon. Retired again in 1955 save for occasional talk show appearances. Following the death of his third wife, in 1957, he married Vivian Gravens, with whom he had been performing. In 1958 he was arrested for assault with a deadly weapon when he fired a handgun after his in-laws had eaten some roast beef he had been saving. At his arraignment, charmed the judge, and he was released. Four days after his birthday, he died in a hospital penniless of pulmonary tuberculosis the same year, and was unable to pay for his hospitalization. Had a larger turnout for his funeral, with some 10,000 fans passing his opening casket. Charity from fellow performers paid for his funeral, and later for his headstone. His last wife, outlived him by thirty years. No children from any of his unions. Inner: Good-humored and charming, with a total focus on delighting his audiences, and little sense of money, despite earning quite a bit. Devoutly religious, claiming he never did a joke that his mother would find offensive. Born to entertain lifetime of focusing entirely on his public career, with everything else quite secondary to his existence, leaving him ultimately incapable of supporting himself ,despite making hoards of money along the way.


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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS MASTER MUGGER:
Storyline: The rubber-faced fool focuses his antic anger to such degree he becomes a $20 million man, as he had once wished, while trying to make his cartoon characterizations palatable to the appetites of a far more reserved Hollywood establishment than the uncritical palates of his wider audience.

dJim Carrey (James Eugene Carrey) (1962) - Canadian/American comedian, screenwriter and producer. Outer: Of French-Canadian descent, with some Irish and Scottish. Father was an accountant, who was also a frustrated performer as a sax clarinetist, with a zany sense of humor. Mother was the depressed child of alcoholics, and suffered from all sorts of ailments, both real and imagined, while constantly talking of her ills. Youngest of 4 in a Catholic household, raised in the Toronto area. The family were all comedians, indulging in food fights and prankster capers to countervail an over/riding sense of parental incompetency. Began cutting-up early in school, realizing the power of outrageous behavior. His father lost his job when he was 13, and became caretaker to his sick wife. All the kids, as well his sire, had to work as janitors and security guards in a tire-rim factory, and for a while the family lived in a tent and VW camper. Dropped out of school in the 9th grade, experienced great anger, including breaking into houses with a brother and stealing alcohol. Began performing routines written with his father in a Canadian comedy club, and developed a successful act built around impressions. 6’2”, rangy, with a handsome, albeit rubbery face. Moved to Los Angeles at 19, and began supporting his parents, who had moved into his apartment, through stand-up impressions at the Comedy Club, although eventually rebelled, and shipped his progenitors back to Toronto, while continuing to support them. Began taking acting lessons, before returning to the stage as a total improviser, eschewing impressions for the far more dangerous spontaneity of on-stage creation. At 20, he starred in a short-lived network comedy, then began getting movie roles before becoming, in his mid-20s, the only male white cast member of TV’s “In Living Color,” where he created several indelibly repellent characters. Married in his mid-20s, daughter from union, although the marriage collapsed as soon as he had his movie breakthrough in 1993, as Ace Ventura, Pet Detective. The film was a surprise mega-hit, and each of his movies that followed, including The Mask, and Dumb and Dumber, proved irresistible to the paying public, making him Hollywood’s highest paid comedic star. When he reached the $20 million plateau, however, he experienced his first failure, although his mugging, and elastic-faced zany style has continued to prove immensely popular, making him a figure to whom both adults and children can readily relate. In his mid-30s, he married actress Lauren Holly, although the relationship proved rocky, with the duo divorcing and then getting back together again, before splitting anew. Took up with actress Rene Zellwegger afterwards, while taking on more fleshed out roles in The Truman Show and Man on the Moon, a biopic on the life of comic Andy Kaufman, with whom he shares birthdays and in which he totally lost himself in the role. His career has been up-and-down since then, as he slowly works on comprehending his own cartoonish character and surreal upbringing while trying to maintain his stronghold on America’s risible sensibilities, and stretching his abilities as an actor with more challenging projects. Added spiritual enlightenment to his mix, while firing his longtime agent, and taking up with comedienne Jenny McCarthy, in a deliberate attempt to expand himself beyond his earlier singular career focus, and dwell in his own sense of light. Proved to be a healing force in her autistic son’s life, allowing him to self-heal, as well, although the couple eventually separated amicably after 5 years, with no explanation other than dual twitter messages from each. Along with her, he became a virulent opponent of vaccinations, claiming they caused autism, and like her, remains an aggressive activist in that regard. Got into a brouhaha with Fox News in 2013 over a satirical video mocking Charlton Heston and gun control, with both sides subsequently savaging each other. Made a modest comeback in late 2014 with the sequel, Dumb and Dumber, To which got mauled by the critics but found enough of an undiscriminating audience to give it some box office cachet. Loopier and loopier as he has gotten older, with an art studio in NY churning out strange pieces, while remaining predictably unpredictable in his public stances as a self-styled dingbat performance artist. In 2015, his girlfriend, Cathriona White, a 28 year old Irish make-up artist, committed suicide after he broke up with her. Her estranged husband later sued him, claiming he was extremely abusive to her and gave her multiple sexually transmitted dis/eases. Her estranged husband later sued him, claiming he was extremely abusive to her and gave her multiple sexually transmitted dis/eases. He later claimed, she had STDS and faked her medical records in order to extort him. Has a net worth of $150 million. Inner: Manic, also depressive, high-strung, immense anger, although with the power to channel it into frenetic humor. Able to serially drop successful modes of expression and try new things. Avid reader of self-help books. Open and reflective, albeit as soon as the camera starts whirring, a bundle of amped-up kinetic energy. Agitated lifetime of achieving mega-stardom as a mugger, while trying to grow and expand as an actor, a person and a vehicle for higher consciousness. dAl ‘Fuzzy’ St. John (1893-1963) - American comic actor. Outer: Nephew of comic Roscoe ‘Fatty’ Arbuckle (Shia LaBeouf) via his mother. Began his career as a boy trick bicyclist, and proved to be an adept acrobatic tumbler. 5’6”, 150 lbs., with blues eyes and blonde hair. Never had any stage experience, instead, went immediately into filmwork. Married Flo Belle Moore in 1914, divorced 9 years later, one daughter from the union. At 20, he joined Mack Sennett’s (Quentin Tarantino) Keystone comedies, where he often played second banana to his uncle, mugging his way through silents. Usually played country hicks in oversized pants with plaid shirts and suspenders. Followed his uncle when he left Sennett, and continued to act as his second banana support, until the former’s career fell apart. In the early 1920s, he began to write and direct his own comedy shorts, which were moderately successful. Married June Price Pearce in 1926. In his early 30s, he started to play character parts in feature films, then rejoined his uncle at the advent of the sound era in a brief series of comic shorts. In his late 30s, he began a new phase as a grizzled Western sidekick in countless low-budged oaters, which earned him the nickname of ‘Fuzzy,’ from his ongoing role as ‘Fuzzy Q. Jones.’ Retired from the screen in his late 50s. While working in a Wild West show in Georgia, he suffered a fatal heart attack, waiting to go on, and passed away at his motel. Cremated afterwards. Inner: Defined the role of comic sidekick for a score of westerns to come. Second banana lifetime of learning the ropes, as it were, about his potential on screen as a secondary character, before coming back full blast as a major comic star on his own.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS WRY COMMENTATOR:
Storyline: The sassy satirist parlays a ready wit and a penchant for cheeky daily commentary into a memorable run as America’s favorite public railer-in-reisidence, as a means of productively dealing with his own angst and anger.

dJon Stewart (Jonathan Stuart Leibowitz) (1962) - American comedian, actor, writer and producer. Outer: Of Jewish descent. Mother was a teacher and educational consultant, father was a physics professor at The College of New Jersey. One older brother, and later two younger half-brothers from his father’s second marriage, after his parents’ divorce in 1971. Lived with his mother, while experiencing competitive tensions with his sire. Went on to the College of William & Mary, where he majored in chemistry, then psychology. A member of the soccer team, he was also a fraternity brother, until hazing turned him off Greek lettered life. Continued feeling profoundly alienated all through his school years, before holding several bureaucratic jobs, as well as a host of transient positions. 5’6”, with a long torso and short legs, giving the impression of being taller when seated behind a desk. Moved to NYC in 1986 to embark on a stand-up comedy career, although it took him a year before he worked up the courage to stand in front of a live mike. Made his debut at The Bitter End, while changing his last name, and in 1989, he got his first TV job as a writer. In 1991, he started hosting TV shows, but lost out to Conan O’Brien in 1993 as a late night network replacement for the departing David Letterman. Rebounded with a popular eponymous talk show on MTV, which was bought as a syndicated network show. However, it was relegated to impossibly late time slots, and was canceled in 1995. Made his film debut in The First Wives Club, although wound up on the cuttingroom floor. Subsequently played a couple of filmic leads and supporting roles, although his cinematic activity would remain secondary to his TV career, which also saw him play himself on “The Larry Sanders Show,” as well as other sitcom appearances. Launched Busboy Productions in the mid-1990s, which would largely remain a reflection of its audio logo, “Oops. Sorry.” Became a guest host for Tom Snyder on the Late Late Show, but eventually grew tired of the yawning hours offered him by the networks, and returned to a far more reasonable time slot on cable TV, with “The Daily Show” in 1999, where he was also a writer and producer, while replacing a host who, ironically, decided to fill a slot as Snyder’s permanent stand-in. In 2000, he married Tracey McShane, after proposing to her via a crossword puzzle concocted with the aid of Will Shortz, the crossword editor of the NY Times. His wife was a graphics designer, who returned to school to become a veterinarian. Both would subsequently share a great love for animals. Son and daughter from the union. Under his stewartship, “The Daily Show” would switch from entertainment-driven commentary to news-oriented fare, while steadily increasing in viewership, until it became a primary news source for many in his audience, who preferred his satirical take on the day’s events over the networks and cable’s more sober-sided reportage. Won the first of his 10 Emmys in 2001 for his efforts, while finding the Bush administration’s violent and corrosive antics perfect fodder for his wit and commentary. Won a pair of prestigious Peabody Awards for his faux journalistic coverage of the 2000 and 2004 presidential elections. Following no set political agenda, he prefers a scatter-shot skewering of everyone, with his ultimate goal of providing laughs and release from the tensions of the day, rather than framing any of his satirical commentary towards specific political viewpoints. Despite his apolitical politics, he has upon occasion made news, with several memorable shows, including a tearful memorial to the fallen World Trade Center, shortly after it disappeared from the NYC skyline in 2001. His “America (the Book): A Citizen’s Guide to Democracy In Action,” a mock high school textbook, which was written along with his staff, proved to be a huge bestseller in 2004. An appearance on “Crossfire,” lambasting his hosts, proved excellent internet fodder, and probably fed into the subsequent cancellation of that noise-infested program. In 2006, he fronted the 78th Academy Awards to less than stellar effect, as a rare non-industry host, although was invited back two year later to make amends, which he did, much in the same manner he had improved on his hosting duties following a dud showing at the 2001 Grammys, with a more sparkling repeat the following year. In between he came in 4th in a Pew poll as America’s most admired journalist. Through his popularity, he has been able to wield a relatively big shtik culturally as a critical voice, taking it to the bloviators on business channel CNBC during the financial crisis in 2008 and 09, and considerably undercutting their influence. Ultimately one out of ten Americans would turn to him for the news. Won his 9th straight Emmy in 2011 for best variety, music or comedy series. The weekend before the mid-term election that year, cohosted, along with Stephen Colbert, a Washington “Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Keep Fear Alive” attracting some 200,000 people in a good-humored attempt to counter the ill-spirited ugliness prevalent in public American political life. Took a break from his show in 2013 to direct and produce his first feature, Rosewater, based on the book, “And Then They Came For Me: A Family's Story of Love, Captivity and Survival." The film was viewed as an earnest but clumsy look at western ideals and middle eastern oppression. Turned down the opportunity to host “Meet the Press,” since it would have meant a straight-laced denial of everything he had been doing with the news. Announced he would be stepping down from the “Daily Show” in August of 2015, after fifteen years at its helm, stating he no longer derived satisfaction from it, with his surprise replacement Trevor Noah, a South African-born comedian, whom he immediately had to defend over insensitive tweets. Retired on the 70th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima with an extended show that paraded his full panoply of support, including those behind the camera, and some political figures he had mocked, in a sweet-natured happy face send-off, somewhat out-of-keeping with his usual acerb small tube presence. Inner: Natural managing editor, with a good eye for getting at the heart of a story, and parsing information down to its essence, both comedic and otherwise. Sees comedy as catharsis, and his show as genuine release for troubled times. Workaholic and hypochondriac, as well as complement-adverse and criticism-embracing. Are you insane?! lifetime of channeling his anger, neuroses and general sense of alienation into a highly productive run as an imitation newsman, with far more credibility than those who pursue the same profession seriously. dLew Lehr (1895-1950) - American commentator, comedian and writer. Outer: Graduated Bucknell Univ. and initially became an architect and real estate broker, before realizing a longtime ambition to perform and turning to the stage with musical comedy and vaudeville. In 1920 he married Anna Leonhardt, whom he met while she was performing under the name of Nancy Belle. Overweight with a pointed mustache, and a predilection for mugging. At the beginning of the Depression, he began writing shorts in which he starred, and soon was serving as the editor, writer and commentator for segments of Fox Movietone News, providing comic relief to the unhappy events of the time. His sardonic and somewhat acrid outlook was featured in “The Dribble-Puss Parade,” which reflected his travels around the U.S. looking for oddball stories. Also enlivened sporting events with his commentary as well. In the late 1930s, he began appearing on musician Ben Bernie’s program, as well as other radio fare, eventually winding up on “Stop Me If You’ve Heard This One,” which would also be the title of one of his joke collections. Became a familiar enough character to be caricatured in several Warner Bros. cartoons, and enjoyed a long run as a comic favorite doing some 300 shorts. Best known for his catchphrase, “Monkeys is the cwaziest people,” although his fame did not outlast his era. Inner: Time specific comedian, whose antics were transient rather than universal. Building block lifetime of honing his wit and muggery to the era in which he found himself, as an alleviator of temporal tensions through a fine eye for the absurd and eccentric.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS COLLEGIAL & COLLEGIATE COMIC:
Storyline: The writerly wit makes the transition from information pleaser to crowd pleaser, thanks to a propensity for solid preparation and a good capacity for growth, allowing him to join the rarified fraternity of late night closers of TV’s entertaining day.

dConan O’Brien (1963) - American TV host, producer and writer. Outer: Of Irish Catholic descent. Grandfather was a policeman, mother was an attorney, father was a physician, epidemiologist and professor of medicine at Harvard. 3rd of 6 children, with two older brothers, two younger sisters and a younger brother. Also cousin to comedian Denis Leary. Loved comedy, but felt somewhat inadequate as a youth because of his thinness, which he capped off with a giant pompadour. Served as managing editor of his high school newspaper, and, after graduating valedictorian of his class, he went to Harvard Univ., where he was noted as a prankster, while writing for the Harvard Lampoon, and serving as its president for two years, a feat only accomplished by one other, 85 years before. 6’4”, gangly and red-haired. Received his B.A. in History and Literature, while graduating magna cum laude. Moved to Los Angeles afterwards to work as a writer for HBO’s “Not Necessarily the News,” while also doing improv on the comedy circuit. Had an instinct for hooking up with shows that would be canceled, and wound up returning east to become a writer for “Saturday Night Live” for several seasons, followed by a similar stint with “The Simpsons.” When David Letterman left “Late Night,” he was asked to be executive producer and find a replacement for him, which he did with himself, beginning in 1993. It would take several years, however, before he truly became comfortable behind the mike, finally finding his audience among younger viewers. The possessor of an off-the-wall sense of humor, he would use himself as a primary target of his jokes, while using mime, impersonations, running gags and his gangly physicality to good comic effect. The fall of the World Trade Center in 2001, would see him re-embrace his earlier faith. Despite his success, he would have difficulty in launching other shows through his production company Conaco. Has appeared as himself and done voiceovers for numerous cartoons and sitcoms. After living with crew member Lynn Kaplan for 5 years during the 1990s, he married advertising exec Liza Powel, whom he had met on his show, in 2002. Daughter and son from the union. Hosted the Emmys several times during the decade, while also enjoying an audience for his own show of some 2/5 million. In 2006, he found himself in the unusual position of being stalked by an obsessive priest, who had attended Harvard the same time he did. A subsequent trial wound up with the latter being sacked from the cloth. Returned to Los Angeles to become the 5th host of “The Tonight Show,” on its 55th anniversary in 2009, replete with his sidekick Andy Richter and drummer Max Weinberg. Lasted 7 months, to mediocre ratings, before his predecessor, Jay Leno replaced him, much to his public pique, despite a huge buy-out of $45 million all told, and a refusal on his part to move back a half hour to accommodate the network’s dealing with their double failure around the two of them. After a 30 city tour, he launched “Conan” on cable TV, which immediately ranked number one among younger viewers, easily outdistancing his network late nite rivals. Made his/story in 2015 when he filmed a show in Cuba, the first time since the embargo over 50 years before that American TV was allowed into the island/nation. Inner: Self-deprecating, and far more the concept and sit-down idea man than standup comic. Amateur musician and progressive Democrat. Cerebral, circumspect and nonconfrontational. Cogitatively comic lifetime of finding a perfect niche for his pseudo-sophomoric skills, and thoroughly enjoying the long ride given him for them. dFranklin Pierce Adams (1881-1960) - American columnist and radio personality. Outer: Parents were recently arrived German-Jewish immigrants. Oldest child of a drygoods merchant. At 13, he changed his name from Franklin Leopold Adams to Franklin Pierce Adams after the 14th U.S. president, as a way of Americanizing himself. Began writing early on, and after public elementary school, went to a private school, where he received a solid grounding in Latin, which he would later employ in translating Roman poets into English. Spent one year at the Univ. of Michigan, before finances curtailed his higher education, although he would later be given an honorary degree there. Came home to Chicago, and began selling insurance to help his family. One of his first customers was humorist and writer George Ade, who inspired him to become a journalist. After penning some humorous verses for the Chicago Journal, as well as a slim volume of poems, he quit his job to become a fulltime writer with the Chicago Tribune in 1903. The following year, he moved to NYC, and began writing for the New York Evening Mail, becoming one of its columnists. While there, he immortalized the double-play combination of the Chicago Cubs, Tinker to Evers to Chance, in the poem, “Baseball’s Sad Lexicon.” Married showgirl Minna Schwartze in 1904. No children from the union, which ended in divorce in 1924. In 1913, he moved over to the New York Tribune, where his column was given the name by which he would subsequently be known, “The Conning Tower.” The latter referred to the superstructure of a submarine, from which the vehicle could be commanded once it surfaced, an apt metaphor for his own subterranean and subaquan sense of humorous insight and satire. Wrote under his initials FPA, while covering culture, society and current events, in his widely-read daily column. During WW I, he served in the army, while contributing to the military paper, “Stars and Stripes,” which brought him into contact with several of the future prime players of The New Yorker magazine, who would play central roles in the NY’s literary scene. Switched allegiance to the New York World in 1921, and after its close in 1931, returned to the redubbed New York Herald Tribune. In 1925, he married socialite Esther Root. The duo had three sons and a daughter, before going their separate ways around 1950. Despite expressing tender feelings towards his children in his poetry, his focus was always outside his family life, and his progeny saw him as aloof and distant. Exerted enormous influence, particularly in the cultural sphere, with his recommendations guaranteeing a readership or viewership for those who impressed him. During the 1920s, he was an integral part of the group of writers and wits who gathered for lunch around the Round Table at the Algonquin Hotel, and impressed one another with their verbal sallies and bon mots. Used his column to push the works of his fellow Algonquinites and others, since it was a must read for both their potential audiences, as well as the heads of the city’s various publishing houses. In 1938, he extended his media reach into radio, becoming one of the panelists on the popular “Information Please,” posturing as a literary expert, with poetry and the works of Gilbert (Harold Pinter) & Sullivan (Elton John), among his areas of expertise. Enjoyed a decade-long run on the show, whose contributors won an encyclopedia if they could stump his fellow panelists. By the end of the 1940s, he began showing signs of what may have been Alzheimer’s disease, where his memory failed him and his temper often got the best of him. After his second divorce, he lived alone in an apartment, before he became totally unable to care for himself, and he wound up in a nursing home, where he died. Aside from the various collections of his writings he sporadically issued, he also translated the Roman poet Horace (T.S. Eliot), as well as other classical writers. Despite his eminent popularity during his active life, he wound up a figure of his time, totally forgotten by subsequent generations. Inner: Witty, convivial, opinionated, and far more into his career than his domestic life, with a hidden anger that belies most wits, which finally came out in his uncontrolled endlife. Always had a cigar firmly clamped in his mouth as an adult. Conning tower lifetime of playing well to his contemporary audiences, both in person and in print, before ultimately sinking into his own angry abyss, and allowing his dark psyche to emerge periscope-like as the singular manifestation of his true self.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS SCOTTISH SONG AND JOKESMITH:
Storyline: The good-humored highlander knows how to mine commercial gold from his cheeky, cultural sensibilities, treating the wayning world to his ongoing brand of progressive retro wit.

dMichael Myers (1963) - Canadian/American comedian. Outer: Parents emigrated from England to Canada. Grew up in a lower middle-class milieu, with his extended family mostly railway workers and miners. Father had been a British army cook who became an Encyclopedia Britannica and insurance salesman, and also had a goofy sense of humor, singing pop songs all the time, while barring people from the house when he felt they were unfunny. His mother was a performer who had given up her career to raise 3 sons, while remaining a delightful eccentric. Youngest of brood. Wanted to be an actor/writer/director from an early age. His father used to wake up his sons to watch late-night British comedies and spy films. He eventually died from Alzheimer disease in 1991, and his son was deeply influenced by him. 5’7”. Began appearing in commercials at the age of 8. Did one with Gilda Radner, then later saw her on “Saturday Night Live,” and vowed to follow in her footsteps. After high school, he joined the Second City troupe in Toronto, which was considered ‘a college for comedians.’ Spent 8 years with the troupe, first in Toronto, then Chicago. Also unsuccessful in England during that period, trying to break into movies. Joined “Saturday Night Live” at 26, and created numerous characters for the show, most memorably, Wayne Campbell, who shot an underground TV show called ‘Wayne’s World,’ in his basement in Aurora, Illinois, along with pal Garth, played by Dana Carvey. The success of the sketch carried over into 2 popular movies, which he co-wrote. Made ‘Not!’ a disclaiming byword of popular parlance. Married screenwriter Robin Ruzan at 30, and quit “SNL” 2 years later to pursue a movie career fulltime, although not before taking time off from his career to read, travel and play, as well as deal with the profound sense of loss he felt at his father’s death. The duo later separated in 2006. Specializes in immature characters, and his unique humor has made him both a popular TV and film figure. Invented British retro-spy Austin Powers, based on his father’s humor, which had a successful film series run, beginning in 1999, and quickly achieved cult status. Sued for pulling out of Sprockets in 2000 because of a dislike of the script, and countersued in return for defamation of character, before an out-of-court settlement was reached. Proved to be difficult to work with afterwards, while scoring a further series of hits as the voice of the ogre Shrek, in its extended popular run. Divorced in 2006, after calling his first wife his muse, and in 2010, secretly married Kelly Tisdale, although the ceremony was not publicly acknowledged until the following annum. Son and two daughters from the union. Has maintained a lower profile during the 2010s, with mostly voice-overs and shorts. The winner of a host of awards for his work, including two Razzies for The Love Guru in 2008, as well as numerous MTV trophies and Canadian conferrals. Inner: A perfectionist who develops his projects slowly, he often spends years between them, to allow his processes their full expansion. Strong work ethic, cheeky sense of humor, and at heart, a silly person, his parents’ son. Tuned to his times lifetime of expanding his abilities, with his father acting as a reflection of his life past in this series, in order to spur him on to build on that foundation and augment both his talents and audience. dSir Harry Lauder (1870-1950) - Scottish singer and comedian. Outer: Of humble origins, his father was a potter, who died before he was 12. The eldest of 8, he worked as a child laborer in a flax mill, where he won singing competitions. Spent 10 years laboring and singing in coal mines, when fellow workers urged him to take his act overground. Started to appear in music hall revues, singing songs that he wrote, which were comedic and either Irish or English, before performing in a kilt. Quickly became a well-loved figure, mixing comedy with songs. Small and grouchy-looking, his success defied analysis, depending, as it did, more on energy, than it did on personality. Much of his humor was of the obvious variety, but he knew how to deliver both a song and a joke to best affect, employing his strong Scottish burr. At the height of his popularity, he worked 4 houses a night. With a large repertory of his own songs, he toured the world, despite reflecting a fanciful, rather than the real Scotland. Best-known for the song, ‘Roaming in the Gloaming,’ which he later used as the title of the first of 4 sets of reminiscences he wrote. Married in 1890 to Ann Vallance, the daughter of the underground manager of a mine. One of his brothers subsequently married one of her sisters. One son from the union who died in 1916 in WW I. Performed both in America and Europe, earning $3000 a week during the early 1900s, as one of the highest paid performers in vaudeville. Given a hero’s welcome each time he came to the United States, making 22 American tours all told. Cultivated a stingy image for laughs, although was strongly motivated by the high salaries he earned. Entertained the troops in France during WW I and gave many concerts for war charities. Lost his wife in 1927, and did sporadic filmwork in his later career, although he was far better known for his stage presence. Knighted in his late 40s, and virtually a national institution in Scotland. Entertained troops during WW II, as well. Performed until he was nearly 80 and died of arterio-thrombosis and kidney disease a year after retiring. Inner: Kindly, though stingy, with a gift for friendship. Subterranean Scottish lifetime of literally rising from the underworld to become a much-beloved star, based more on his delivery than his personality or talent.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS SELF-STYLED MISSIONARY:
Storyline: The libertarian controversialist knows how to stir up his audiences with a combination of projections and paranoia, as he gives voice to his crypto-iconic status as the previous generation’s poster boy for unyielding conservative ideals.

dGlenn Beck (1964) - American media personality. Outer: From a family of bakers of Scandinavian descent. Father ran a bakery called the Sweet Tooth in a small town. Had two sisters and two brothers. When he was 15, his mother, who suffered from addiction and manic depression, drowned, after his had parents divorced, in what may have been a suicide. Later a stepbrother killed himself, while his other male sibling had a youthful but fatal heart attack. Raised a Roman Catholic and grew up in working-class environs in the northwest, suffering from Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Fascinated by radio from an early age, he won a contest for an hour of radio airtime when he was 13, and a year later was a late-night and weekend disk jockey at a trinity of stations, one Christian, one rock and one country, although was fired for missing shifts at all 3, at the tender age of 14. His internal anger and rage led to drugs at 16, while feeling he was an egomaniacal fraud destined for the same end as his mother. Began his full-time career immediately after graduation and enjoyed early success, becoming the nation’s youngest morning top-40 DJ at 18, before moving about the country, ultimately winding up in New Haven, Conn. 6’2” with salt and pepper After coming to Washington, he married Claire, and had two daughters, the older of whom has cerebral palsy. Despite his easy rise, by the age of 30, he was addicted to both alcohol, drinking a gallon of Jack Daniels a week, and drugs, to the point where he fell through a window while intoxicated, permanently injuring his back. His marriage disintegrated into divorce in 1994, as he began looking for redemption through religion, and recovery through the ministrations of AA. Entered Yale Univ. as a theology major, although only lasted a semester, while his career bottomed out. Met his second wife, Tania, a former fan of his, in 1998, and married a second time the following year, with an adopted son and a daughter from the union, while converting to Mormonism and being baptized as such at the same time, after exploring various religious possibilities. Decided to become a talk-show radio host, and in 2001, he launched himself as such in Florida. By 2002, he was a nationally syndicated figure, after his libertarian views found a large audience, who enjoyed his storytelling skills, and his carelessly entertaining way with facts. That combination allowed him to rise to number three in talk radio, with a projected audience of 5 million. Added cable TV to his c.v. via CNN in 2006, finding a similar niche as a political entertainer, as well as a modest audience tuned to his particular prejudicial take on world events and pop culture. In early 2009, he joined Fox News, and quickly doubled and trebled his audience, while his rants and opinions became anathema to a far wider swath of people. Called Barack Obama a racist and lost much advertising revenue, although it was quickly made up in other quarters, thanks to his high ratings, and his ability to constantly tweak his critics. Gears his shows towards apocalyptic fears, and in the process has become a horror show host of sorts, playing off of America’s dread of foreign isms, while serving as a blackboard instructor for those who ascribe to his school of political conspiracies replete with elites plotting to seize control over all our lives, including pointy-headed professors and progressives. Creator of the 9/12 Project, based on his patriotic principles and values, as his star continues to rise as an agenda-heavy doomsayer and missionary for an America that largely exists in his own perfervid imagination. Founder and editor of “Fusion,” a conservative political magazine, and the author of several best-selling tomes, while also touring the U.S. in a stage show twice a year, beginning in 2005. In 2010, he gave the keynote address at CPAC, calling for purity of party to give it parity with the unspeakable progressivism of the liberal agenda. Raked in some $32 million in 2009, while broadly hinting that the true motivation behind all he does is a blinding bank account, and little else. Announced in 2010 he is starting Beck University, an online and uncredited affair, with Faith, Hope and Charity as touchstones for the various courses taught. Also announced he may be going blind from a genetic disorder. Drew a hefty crowd of anti-Obamaites on the 47th anniversary of Martin Luther King’s “I have a dream” speech, eliciting the presence of one of his nieces, as well, while calling for the country to come out of its darkness in order to return to God, in his own “I have a nightmare” discourse. Launched his own news website The Blaze immediately afterwards, in his increasing ascendance as the public’s go-to voice of reaction. Ended his Fox TV show in mid-2011 to focus on his internet activities, including GBTV, an online pay-for-access television site to test his true power among his faithful, while remaining an incendiary touchstone for those tuned into his apocalyptic take on current events. Moved to the Dallas area afterwards, renting a large estate, while opening new TV and radio studios there, as part of his extended production company, Mercury Radio Arts. Toured Israel under the banner of “Restoring Courage,” capping it off with a rally in Jerusalem near the Southern Wall excavation site, with strong Christian Zionist overtones, that drew about 1700 Israelis and evangelists, as he vowed to start a global movement that would defend the land promised from the UN and human rights organizations around the world. The rally would be continued in South Africa, and end in Texas, and would draw predictably positive and negative reactions from the right and left respectively. In 2012, he signed a 100 mlllion five year radio deal, just to let everyone know his brand of no-information paranoia is still very much a viable money-making brand. Apoplectic and apocalyptic over Obama's winning a second term, giving his listenership enough gloom-laden projections on the future to keep them continually tuned in to his delusional antics. By 2016, however, his media empire began imploding with an exodus of his executives, as his ominous projections on the larger world reflect his own much smaller one. Took to spinning on a giant gyroscope, which he told his fans has cured him of a mysterious brain illness, while instituting a multi-million dollar fraud and breech of contract lawsuit that may ultimately see himself as its primary plaintiff. By year’s near end, the site came apart, suffering from a total lack of editorial direction, as its staff was cut from 25 to 6. Inner: Narcissistic, messianic and needy. Highly emotional, with a penchant for easy public tears, and a hyper-dramatic read of everything that makes anybody’s newscast, and a lot of things which don’t. Sees himself as a liberator of the hapless masses of our time, whose property and rights are being absorbed by the progressive collectivism of a Democratic government hell bent on destroying all motivation for individual material accrual. Obsessed with actor Orson Welles, using the name ‘Mercury’ after his Mercury Theatre on a host of his own creations. Televangelist on a secular station lifetime of losing, then finding himself as an entertaining voice of the Apocalypse, in his ongoing sense of mission to prepare America for the worst by appealing to its most untrusting, fearful and jittery elements. dJohn Birch (1918-1945) - American missionary and military intelligence officer. Outer: Both his parents were Baptist missionaries. The eldest of six, with four brothers. Born in the Himalayas, and, at 2, returned with his parents to the U.S., growing up in New Jersey and Georgia. Showed himself to be an angry young zealot, and a great defender of his faith, which defined him. Went to Mercer Univ., a Southern Baptist school, where he organized a witch hunt against heretic professors who believed in apostate theories such as evolution, and then decided to become a missionary like his parents, enrolling in Bible Baptist Seminary in Texas. Tall and lean. Sailed to China in 1940, and began studying Mandarin, although was forced to flee to eastern China following the bombing of Pearl Harbor in late 1941. Used his time to establish new missions, and through a meeting with Air Force Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle, whom he helped to safety after crash landing, he was recruited as an intelligence officer and commissioned a first lieutenant. Went to work for the OSS, the primary U.S. intelligence gathering outfit during the WW II era, and proved highly effective in pinpointing Japanese military locales through his network of Chinese informers. Aggressive in his continued pursuit of his missionary work, seeing himself as an evangelical above all else, and as anti-communist as he was anti-Japanese. Promoted to captain and given the Legion of Merit in 1944. The following year, he was taken prisoner 11 days after VJ day by communist soldiers in China, while leading a mixed group to a Japanese prison camp, and, after refusing to give up his revolver, was shot and killed. The rest of his party was imprisoned, but soon released. Became the first victim of the Cold War, and as such, an iconic hero to hardcore traditionalists, who formed the John Birch Society in 1958, using him as symbol of recalcitrant resistance to any ism to the left of democratic capitalism. Awarded the Distinguished Service Medal posthumously. Inner: Brash, aggressively religious, and fiercely focused on everything he did. Ultimately iconic lifetime of immortalizing himself through his unbending sense of mission as well as his unconscious sense of timing, making his a famous name that would far outlive his actions.


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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS OVERWEIGHT, OVERWROUGHT CLOWN:
Storyline: The hefty life of the party embraces death as the ultimate joke on himself in his inability to find any sort of balance between his appetite for food, fame and fortune and the restrictions that mortality always places on all three.

dChris Farley (1964-1997) - American comedian. Outer: From a close Catholic, church-going family. Middle of 5 children. His childhood heroes were the original male stars of “Saturday Night Live,” particularly John Belushi, whom he spent a brief lifetime trying to emulate. 5’8”, and heavyset. Brother Kevin would become a comedian as well. Educated at Marquette Univ., and then began his show business career doing stand-up comedy with the Second City troupe, like his inspirers, and eventually graduated to “Saturday Night Live,” in 1990, first as a support player and then one of its mainstays, through his 5 years with the show. Began his film career in 1992 with Wayne’s World, and then went on to star in several popular vehicles of his own, most notably Beverly Hills Ninja, often playing his large figure off of small comic, David Spade. A compulsion to be the on all the time, as well as an extremely addictive personality, led him to continually binge on food, drink, sex and drugs, particularly cocaine and heroin, causing him to balloon up past 300 pounds. Although he was in and out of drug and alcohol-rehab clinics, AA meetings and weight loss centers, he was incapable of maintaining any kind of discipline around any of his appetites. Often shy when not in an altered state, he spent his last weeks in Chicago, as a regular church-goer. After a drug’n’drink fueled four days of no sleep, he spent his last night with a prostitute named Heidi, smoking crack and snorting cocaine. Ultimately found dead in his apartment by his brother, clutching a baseball cap and rosary beads. The same age as John Belushi, who also exited via a lethal combination of narcotic intoxicants. Inner: Extremely child/like and vulnerable, without the ability to transmute the love of his audiences into a sense of self-love. Great need to be the center of attention at all times, and, despite continued warnings from friends and associates, totally heedless of his addictions and their deadly effect on him. Bottomless pit lifetime of emulating a self-destructive idol right down to his demise, in an ongoing binge of outer love and inner self-dislike, with no internal facility to control his behavior our desires. dNorman ‘Chubby’ Chaney (1918-1936) - American comedian. Outer: Won a nationwide contest to be the heavyset star of the ‘Our Gang,’ series, and made 18 of them between 1929 and 1931. Had a trademark frown that swallowed his face alive. Returned to public school following his brief Hollywood run, but because of a glandular condition, he ballooned up to 300 pounds and had to be operated on to ameliorate his excess. Dropped down to 136 pounds after the operation, but never recovered from the complications that ensued, and died the following year. Inner: Well-liked, with a good sense of humor. Hindenberg lifetime of extreme discomfort in an overweight body, despite natural clowning abilities, necessitating an early explosive exit to try the exact same dynamics from a psychological, rather than a physiological sense of displacement.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS FAUX BLOWHARD:
Storyline: The posturing pundit parlays self-parody into iconic status for himself as the contrived answer to clueless media gasbags, while hiding a far more spiritual sober-sided side of himself, as an exemplar of the power of positive faith-infused thinking.

dStephen Colbert (Stephen Tyrone Colbert) (1964) - American comedian, satirist and writer. Outer: Of mostly Irish descent, with some German and British. Youngest of 11 children of an Irish Catholic family, with 7 brothers and 3 sisters. Mother had always wanted to be an actress, and was “a very big personality,” according to her son. Father was an introverted immunologist and the vice-president for academic affairs at the Medical Univ. of South Carolina. Grew up in a stimulating environment where questioning religion didn’t take away from a sense of spiritual devotion. Despite being raised in the South, he deliberately trained himself to sound neutrally American by imitating news anchors, in order to sidestep a TV stereotype that he saw of dumb Southern crackers. When he was ten his father and two brothers were killed in an airplane crash on the way towards enrolling the latter duo in a prep school. His household was suddenly reduced to two, with everyone else off to college or working and he and his mother subsequently moved to Charleston, where he felt completely disconnected and retreated into religion, fantasy, science fiction and role-playing games in order to compensate for his profound sense of father-loss. Beaten regularly at a new school, he soon discovered that joke-telling protected him. Participated in school drama and the school newspaper, and also fronted for a Rolling Stones cover band. 5’10 1/2” and bespectacled. Originally wanted to be a marine biologist, but a perforated eardrum ended that dream, and he wound up deaf in his right ear. Went to Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, and continued to pursue acting, while studying philosophy. Two years later he transferred to Northwestern Univ.’s School of Communication in order to study Theater Arts. Initially, he had little interest in comedy, and did experimental plays, which led him to Chicago’s Annoyance Theater, a dramatic improv group that looked down on their comic brethren. After graduating in 1986, he found himself depressed and without faith, until someone handed him a Gideon Bible on the street, which reinvigorated his sense of spirituality. The only theater work he could find was with the comedic Second City troupe, working their phones and box office, which entitled him to take classes at their training center. Subsequentlye joined the troupe’s touring company, and hooked up with Amy Sedaris and Paul Dinello as writing partners, after an initial strained relationship with the latter. Married Evelyn McGee, who would occasionally play his mother in sketches he wrote for “Strangers with Candy.” One daughter and two sons from the union, who would later appear on “The Daily Show,” although he wouldn’t let them watch him on TV, for fear they’d misunderstand the irony behind his performances. Relocated to NYC, in the mid-1990s, for another insecure stretch, before finally getting a TV writing stint with VH1. Subsequently created a Comedy Central TV sketch series “Exit 57,” in 1995 with Sedaris and Dinello, which got good reviews, but barely lasted a season. Flitted between network and cable over the next year, then joined his previous partners in 1998 for “Strangers with Candy,” a parody of high school specials replete with off-kilter moral lessons, which gained a cult following. In it, he played a closeted and completely oblivious homophile his/story teacher, whose egregiously dense displays would serve as a basis for his later equally obtuse pundit character. The series would later take film form, to somewhat mixed reviews, as was the show, whose appeal was limited, albeit cultish by those who thoroughly enjoyed its off-the-wall humor. The previous year he joined the cast of Comedy Central’s “The Daily Show,” as a parody correspondent, although the show didn’t really click with a large audience until Jon Stewart took over hosting and writing duties in 1999, when it began to serve as a much-needed counterfoil to the extended 2000 presidential election season. Developed a self-important opinionater character whose resolute ignorance resonated with audiences, winning him three writing Emmys in 2004, 2005 and 2006. His various bits got him his own spin-off series, “The Colbert Report,” in late 2005, in which he continued playing the character he had created. The show proved an instant hit for Comedy Central, subsequently embarrassing numerous politicians who appeared on it, until many became leery of subjecting themselves to its host’s devastating and dead-on wit. Earned an appearance at the White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner in 2006, during which much of his delicious repartee about the Bush Administration and the media sailed right over the heads of its invited targets. Vaulted to the top of the NY Times bestseller list with “I Am America (And So Can You!),” and has also made guest appearances on a variety of both comedy and dramatic TV series, in keeping with the actor that lies behind all his performances. In 2008, he announced he would run for president as a favorite son in his native South Carolina, on the Democratic primary ballot, although the effort was thwarted, by those who took the designation far too seriously. Won a comedy album Grammy in 2010, and later that year, cohosted a Washington Mall gathering with Jon Stewart he called “The March to Keep Fear Alive,” which attracted some 200,000 eager to show that America still has a sense of humor, even when it comes to its own political sphere. Launched his own super PAC, as a lampoon of campaign finance laws, in 2011, and won approval for it, raising over a million the following annum in another faux run at the White House, to highlight the folly of presidential nominative politics. Added writing Emmys to his awards list in 2013, and was tapped by David Letterman to take over “The Late Show” on his retirement in 2015, much to the consternation of various right-wing pundits. Retired his character at the end of 2014, and in his final lap, had Pres. Obama take over the show, delivering a sardonic critique on himself, replete with doctored phrases, before taking a six month break. A host of celebrities joined him in his final telecast, where he killed Death by shooting him during a game of chess, then, at the very end, rode off in Santa’s sleigh, signing off from eternity. Inaugurated his Late Show hosting run in September of 2015 with George Clooney and Jeb Bush as his initial guests. Eschewed the traditional opening monologue in favor of his ongoing jester banter, as his audience and fan-base overwhelmingly approved the ‘real’ Stephen Colbert, allowing him to settle in for his own unique stewardship of a long-running franchise, with the promise of setting himself quite apart from his predecessors. When he finally confronted Donald Trump on one of his early shows, he proved to be remarkably conciliatory after years of mocking and lacerating him. Showed himself to be a little too earnest initially without his usual ironic persona, as if revealing a far blander being behind his earlier character mask. Finally began to find his moorings after the 2016 election, to become far more of himself and a late night voice once again to be listened to. Announced on Russian TV in 2017, that he would make another bid for the presidency in 2020. Updated the Emma Lazarus Statue of Liberty poem , “Give me yur wealthy, your rich, your huddled MBAS, yearning to be free.” Has a net worth of $45 million. Inner: News junkie, nominal Democrat and practicing Roman Catholic, with a strong moral sense, and a genuine desire to expose hypocrisy. Despite his Irish roots, uses a French pronunciation (Col-bear) for his name. Father-loss and deafness on his right, or male, side, seem to have opened him up to his deeper left-side sense of spirituality. Tries to live without fear and worry, seeing both as counterproductive. Role-playing lifetime of finding a perfect character to capture the public imagination, while rediscovering his deep sense of faith and abiding belief in the extraordinary in ordinariness. dIrvin S. Cobb (1876-1944) - American writer, humorist and columnist. Outer: Both parents were descended from early Kentucky settlers. His maternal grandfather, Dr. Reuben Saunders, discovered a cure for cholera via hypodermically-induced morphine-atropine. Father was initially in the tobacco trade, then the steamboat business, before managing a river supply store. Second of 4 children. Grew up in his grandfather’s large house, and had an enchanted childhood filled with colorful characters, whom he would later explore and expand upon in his writings. Educated both publicly and privately, he augmented his studies with a ton of reading, ranging from the classics to dime novel trash. Suffered childhood’s end, when he was forced to quit school at 16 at the death of his grandfather died, because his father was unable to cope with it and turned to the bottle as salve for his loss. Began writing for his native Paducah Daily News at 17, and within two years, he was the country’s youngest managing news editor. Shifted over to the Louisville Evening Post afterwards. Unimpressive physically, and ultimately a caricaturist’s delight, with a rotund figure, jutting eyebrows, heavy jowls, a triple chin and a ubiquitous cigar in his mouth. Laura Spacer Baker, one daughter from the union, Elizabeth Cobb, who became a novelist. Moved to NYC and in 1904, he was hired by the NY Evening Sun, who sent him to Portsmouth, New Hampshire to cover the Russian-Japanese negotiations to end their 1904-1905 war. His personality-driven articles were syndicated and secured his next position at Joseph Pulitzer’s (Rudy Giuliani) NY World, where he became the country’s highest paid staff reporter. Began appearing in silent films, starting with The Arab in 1915, and continued playing sporadic roles into the 1930s. Covered WW I for the Saturday Evening Post, and later wrote about his experiences in “Paths of Glory.” Fairly prolific in his output, he contributed to a variety of periodicals, while also co-writing several Broadway productions, as well as providing the story for a host of motion pictures. His best-remembered works would be humorous tales of his Kentucky past, focusing on local color. With them, he eventually became the most widely read short story writer of his times. His first collection came out in 1915, and he would continue issuing them periodically. In addition, he also penned horror tales, and was ultimately rewarded for the universality of his efforts by being made a chevalier of the French Legion of Honor. Hosted the 1935 Academy Awards, and spent the latter part of his career as an after-dinner speaker and Chautauqua lecturer. Died of dropsy in his hotel apartment, and left instructions that his funeral should be cheerful. Inner: Enjoyed living well, and rarely exercised. Subject to irritability and occasional flashes of hot temper, despite his largely good-humored disposition. Staunch Democrat, but more and more conservative as he grew older. Corn-off-the-cobb lifetime of parlaying a highly companionable wit into a well-received multimedia career of self-expression, while living well as his own best revenge against a truncated magical childhood, that thrust him into adulthood before he could take the full measure and pleasure of it.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS UNINTEGRATED CHARACTER:
Storyline: The reincarnated racist finds himself in a body color he had earlier despised, and does his self-destructive best in trying to come to terms with the karmic repercussions of his new identity.

dMartin Lawrence (Martin Fitzgerald Lawrence) (1965) - American comedian, actor, director, producer, writer, singer, and musician.. Outer: Of African-American descent. His mother raised her children in a housing project working as a cashier. His father, who was in the Air Force, left the family when he was 8. One of 6, and born overseas, while his progenitor was stationed in Germany. Hyperactive, flunked 2nd grade. Entertained his mother, and later an art teacher allowed him to tell jokes at the end of class in a trade-off for being quiet during it. 5’7 1/2”. Began as a stand-up comic, and parlayed his success into roles in two hit films, before becoming the star of Fox network’s first African-American sit-com, the eponymous “Martin,” but the success of the show turned him into a power freak, throwing tantrums, firing his manager, and making life unpleasant for those working with him. At 30, he married Patricia Southall, a former Miss Virginia, one daughter from union. After another hit turn costarring in Bad Boys, he began flubbing his lines and laughing hysterically over nothing in his next film, before being sent home by the director, only to pull out a gun at a carwash and wander the streets shouting. Despite recovering from the incident, his wife filed divorce papers on him, claiming she feared for her life. Later that year, the co-star on his show quit, charging him with sexual harassment, which was settled out-of-court, but also ended the show. Caused more headlines by collapsing in excessive heat on his front doorstep, then lingering twixt life’n’death for 3 days before recovering. Despite his ongoing problems, including being extremely difficult to work with, and causing continual havoc on his sets, he reached the $20 million per film mark as a top tier comedian at century’s new beginning, and remains a man at sea with himself. Attempted to explain himself in the concert film, Runteldat, while maintaining the desire to make people laugh as his ultimate motivation for everything. In 2010, he married his longtime girlfriend Shamika Gibbs, after fifteen years and two daughters together, only to file for divorce two years later. Inner: Manic energy, mixture of arrogance and anger, extremely insecure, blaming marijuana for many of his lapses. Skin-switching lifetime of continuing to search for maturity through a highly public profile, and a change of races, which ironically countered his racist views of his previous existence in this series. dCarl Switzer (1926-1959) - American comedian. Outer: Father was a Nazified German who drilled into his son that he was a member of the master race, and was superior to everyone else. Began performing in early childhood, before joining the ‘Our Gang’ gang at Hal Roach studios under the nickname ‘Alfalfa.’ Freckle-faced with a squeaky voice, he became one of the mainstays of the series for 7 years, making some 60 shorts, although he was roundly disliked by his fellow child performers. Spoiled rotten and a constant practical joker and pest. Despite his antic off-key singing, he was trained in the vocal arts, and had begun his career as a chid singer. After the ‘Our Gang’ comedies, he worked in features, although as he grew older, there was less and less demand for him, and he wound up doing bit parts in films. Married Dian Collingwood, a Kansas City heiress for 5 weeks in his late 30s, then was arrested later that year for drunken driving, one child from the union. Exhibited strong and stronger antisocial behavior as he got older, turning on his friends, and often getting involved in fights. Became a fishing and hunting guide in California and eventually a bartender. Shot in the arm while exiting his car, although the assailant was never caught, then was arrested for chopping down 15 pine trees in a National Forest. Tried a comeback with a small role in The Defiant Ones, then had to wait for its release. While doing so, he was shot to death in the stomach by a former hunting-venture partner in the latter’s house when he came at him with a knife over a $50 reward for a lost dog. The shooting was subsequently ruled justifiable homicide. Died the same day as legendary director Cecil B. DeMille, in one final ironic upstagement. Inner: Racist, angry, totally self-involved, and a continual brooder. Closet Nazi lifetime of being programmed into an unjustified sense of his own racial superiority, before descending into his own rage when the world failed to support his inflated sense of self, causing him to finally self-destruct through it.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS ADOLESCENT ADULANT:
Storyline: The nimble buffoon employs the same strategies and tactics that had earlier served him well in fashioning a self-satisfying career two lifetimes in the making, giving his childishness play in public and its more mature counterpart in private, in an attempt to integrate the two via a great need for mass adulation.

dAdam Sandler (Adam Richard Sandler (1966) - American actor, filmmaker, comedian, musician and producer. Outer: Of Lithuanian Jewish descent, and the youngest of 4. Born in Brooklyn, but raised in New Hampshire. Father was an electrical engineer. Close to his parents, idolizing the former. Initially wanted to be a fireman, but his draw towards clowning proved a far greater pull. Class cut-up and slacker while growing up. After impulsively jumping up and taking advantage of an open mike in a comedy club, he knew that laughter would be his professional pursuit from then on. 5’10”, with black hair and dark brown eyes. In the 1980s, he worked on MTV game shows doing characters, in a quasi-performance artist mode, before landing a repeat role on the popular “Cosby Show,” mid-decade for a four year run. During that time he graduated NYU with a B.F.A. in 1988. Continued doing standup, and was steered into becoming a staff writer with TV’s “Saturday Night Live,” in 1990, and soon became a cast member, with a variety of characters, as well as a host of offbeat songs. Left the show in 1995, to pursue a film career, and quickly made himself into a brand, playing misfits and outcasts, who, nevertheless, triumph at the end, beginning with Billy Madison in 1995, which he also wrote. Within three years, he had reached a $100 million + plateau with his formulaic slapstick comedies, thanks in large part to the fanatic loyalty of the teenage boys and young men who identified with his variations on his singular themes, most of which would go on include fellow alumni from his SNL days. Having assured his success, he surrounded himself with a close coterie, many of whom are longtime friends, and avoids media contact, since his fans don’t read critics anyway, using TV shows to promote his films, which raised him to the $20 million per picture level. Able to expand into more dramatic roles as well, giving credible and much more critic-friendly performances in several subsequent films, playing off his fumbling and endearing earnestness. Formed Happy Madison Productions to develop scripts for fellow SNL alumni, as well as an online entertainment company, Shnorff.com, which produces animated and live-action programming. Has managed to match his screen career with comedy CDs, which play off his darker sensibilities, rather than the innocent he usually portrays on the screen, whose supporting characters act out his peccadilloes, so as not to offend the parents of his core audience. In 2003, he married model Jackie Titone, son and daughter from union, with the former appearing in several of his films. Swept the 2012 Razzies with 10 awards for Jack and Jill, winning in every category, including worst picture and worst actor, as well as worst actress, in his dual starring role, in an unprecedent dubious achievement never before accomplished. Won another Razzie the following year for That’s My Boy, just to show he wasn’t a flash in the dented pan. With his audience steadily diminishing, he made a deal in 2014 to have four of his movies stream exclusively on Netflix. Unable, however, to accommodate himself to a hipper, more demanding young audience, as his offerings have steadily drawn smaller and smaller box office. Part of the stellar cast of 2017’s Netflix release, The Meyerowitz Stories, allowing him a chance to somewhat rehabilitate his comic reputation. Has a net worth of $340 million. Inner: Goofy and shy. Hard-working, involving himself in every level of his product, from the script to cutting the trailer. Proud of his Jewish heritage, and a devoted NY sports fan. Realized lifetime of achieving his previous go-round’s goal of being comically heroic and childlike at once, and being well-rewarded for his triumphant efforts, at least in the early part of his career, before repetitive predictability set in. dLou Costello (1908-1959) - American comedian. Outer: Father was an italain immigrant, and mother was of French and Irish descent. From Paterson, NJ., which he subsequently mentioned in many of his film or TV work. Originally wanted to be a professional athlete, with basketball his favorite sport. 5’4”, and increasingly rotund as he got older. Began his working life in his teens with a variety of jobs. Fought as a boxer a few times, then went out to Hollywood with the hope of landing in films, but wound up as a laborer on several studio lots, and the only work he could get in front of the camera was as a stunt man. Entered comedy after a local vaudeville house put out a call for a “Dutch comedian.” Worked with several partners as the clown to their straight-man on the vaudeville and burlesque circuit, and married Ann Battlers in 1934, 3 daughters and a son from union. Met Bud Abbot in 1936, who was his physical opposite, tall and serious, while he was dumpy and clownish. Both ditched their partners and became a team, touring the vaudeville circuit. After a Broadway run with a variety review, “The Streets of Paris,” they graduated to radio, introducing verbal burlesque routines to an audience who had never heard them. They were a surprise success, thanks to their innate comic chemistry, and they quickly translated their popularity into film, beginning in 1940 with One Night in the Tropics, followed by Buck Privates, which was a megahit. With Abbott playing the dour chastiser, and himself the victim of the former’s snarls and slaps, as well as pratfall reactions to them, the two were able to transliterate vaudeville into the newer mediums, creating several classic routines, which they perfected, rather than created, including “Who’s on first?,” a convoluted baseball riddle. Both were very active during WW II raising millions for the war effort. The pair would make 34 films together, eventually becoming slapstick icons, with Abbott and Costello integrated into the titles of many of the later ones. Completely undisciplined in his performing, he would often ad-lib and extend routines, with his trademark, “I’m a ba-a-a-a-a-ad boy!” while his partner predictably tried to rein him in. Offstage, the roles were reversed, where he made most of the career decisions, privately playing the adult of the two, while publicly performing as if he were still an adolescent. Caught rheumatic fever, which is usually a childhood disease, in 1942, and he had to rest for nine months. The next year, his son, who would have been a year old the next day, drowned in a swimming pool accident. After hearing the news, he, nevertheless, went on to perform that night, but his marriage would be shaky forever after, thanks to his blaming his wife for not taking care of her responsibilities. Insisted afterwards that he wanted to play more sympathetic, heroic parts, and for the next 2 films, his partner acquiesced, taking a lesser role, as the team was almost renamed Costello & Abbot. Went back to their formulaic work, while retaining top box office status,during the 1950s, and had a season’s run on TV in 1952 and 1953, after forming his own production company, TV Corporation of America. The pair got into tax trouble, thanks to their lack of business acumen, and an accountant who couldn’t count right, and were hounded by the IRS. By 1957, Abbott, who had been afflicted with epilepsy for decades, no longer had the energy for the act, and the team, which had periodically been rancorous, despite an abiding affection both had for one another, finally split up. Made one film on his own, The 30-Foot Bride of Candy Rock, before dying shortly afterwards, of a heart attack, after uttering one final hallucinatory line of childish delight, “That was the best ice cream soda I ever tasted.” Inner: Expert tumbler, and far more physical than his seemingly clumsy persona projected. Evinced far more discontent than his public image, as well, often wanting what he did not have, rather than appreciating what he did. Slapstick master lifetime of publicly playing the amiable stooge, while keeping his anger private, allowing him to be a mass masochistic foil for his audience’s need for an entertaining whippingboy, who well knows how to hide his pain.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS ETERNAL HIPSTER:
Storyline: The truth-telling trickster cleans up his inner act through a far more solid, loving upbringing, and, in doing so, is able to bring his perceptive, biting commentary to a far wider audience without thoroughly undoing himself in the process.

dChris Rock (Christopher Julius Rock) (1967) - American comedian. actor, writer and director. Outer: Of west African descent with some British ancestry..Father was a truck driver, mother was a teacher who worked with the mentally handicapped. Oldest of 7, parents also took in foster children. Brother Tony became a comedian as well. Enjoyed a loving home and close family, who were his first audience. Wanted to be a famous comic from the age of 7. Grew up on a brownstone block in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn but was bussed to an all-white school, where he was “smacked around like a hockey puck,” before being switched to a neighborhood school. Learned his verbal skills through ranking sessions with friends, as well as listening to comedy albums, particularly Richard Pryor. Thin and lithe, 5’11”, 140 lbs, grew up on rap music, and has turned it into his own scatter-shot commentary. Dropped out of high school at 17 to become a stand-up comic, later got his GED. Worked as a busboy, then was so frightened at his first show in 1984, he had to be pushed on stage, but became a regular at the Comic Strip, after camping out in front of it initially in his car. Inspired by the career of Eddie Murphy, whom he later met, and got him his debut role in films in Beverly Hills Cop II in 1987. Although he achieved some bit roles on TV, he spent years on the comedy circuit, listening to other comedians and performing, while landing parts in movies, including his own rap satire, CB4. His father’s death in 1988 was very traumatic, forcing him to help support the family. A 3 year stint on “Saturday Night Live,” beginning in 1990, cemented his career as a hip young comic, although he was accused of not giving his all for the show, which was followed by a half-year stint on “In Living Color.” Won a cable Ace award for an HBO special, ‘Big Ass Jokes,’ and received his anointment as ‘The Performer’ of his generation with “Bring the Pain,” skewering black culture and public personalities. A veritable panther on stage, prowling, stalking and striding before his audience, while using a preacher’s cadence to limn his incisive insights. Author of “Rock This,” huckster for several products, as well as host of his own HBO late-night show, the eponymous, “Chris Rock Show,” from 1997 to 2000. Won 3 Emmys, 2 for a 1996 special, and 2 Grammys for his various efforts. Married Malaak Compton, a public relations coordinator in his late 20s, one child from union. Experienced the death of fellow comic and close friend Chris Farley as unconscious reflection of his earlier self-induced demise. His movie career continues to expand his possibilities, as he credits his own sense of discipline with breaking through to the other side of himself, although he remains a Hollywood outsider. Made his directorial debut in 2003 with Head of State, although that medium remained elusive to his visual sensibilities, despite his scabrous wit. Hosted the 2005 Oscar telecast, in an attempt by the producers to reach a younger audience, although tempered his sensibilities in order to do so, while viewing the move as a further grounding for his own film career. Later that year, he launched a sitcom, as writer/producer/ narrator, “Everybody Hates Chris,” based on his own childhood difficulties as a bussed student, which ran for five seasons. Continually improving as a slash/slash/slash filmmaker, despite distinct limitations as an actor, as evinced by I Think I Love My Wife, a wicked 2007 remake of an earlier French New Wave classic. Released his third directorial effort, Top 5, in 2014, playing a hugely successful comedian who just doesn’t feel funny anymore. More poignant than his previous efforts, and in its own way, a declaration that we need comedy. Getting beaten by cops can be farcical according to the film, which underlies the joyousness of life, even at its most oppressive and depressing. Has hardly aged in the last decade, and remains a cogent critic of his times, with his sharp wit unfailing in its ability to skewer the failures of post-modern America. Split from his wife of 10 years immediately after his film’s release. Prior to that they had taken a South African girl, Ntombe, into their home in 2008, although never officially adopted her. in their bitter divorce proceedings, his ex-wife subsequently absconded with her. Hosted the 2016 Oscars in his usual incisive way, giving sharp voice to the award show’s lack of racial diversity in its nominees, in one of the lowest viewed telecasts ever. His ‘Total Blackout” world your in 2017, his first in nine years, was extremely well-received. Has a net worth of $70 million. Inner: Self-acclaimed “duke of doubt.” Honest, wise and modest, with a much softer tongue in private, saving his scatology for public appearances. Warm, accessible, witty, perceptive. Healing lifetime of taking his hip brand of humor into African-American culture, and by springing forth from a solid base, has been able to explore it without self-destructing. dLenny Bruce (Leonard Schneider) (1925-1966) - American comedian. Outer: From a Jewish household, his mother harbored show business fantasies, while his father was an English immigrant who fit orthopedic shoes and ultimately became a physio-therapist. Neither parent was in love with the other when they married. Instead, his mother saw the world as her audience. His parents subsequently divorced when he was five, and he grew up under the heavy influence of his mother, who worked occasionally as a stand-up comic under the name of Sally Marr, and introduced him into her fantasy world, taking him to burlesque shows and imbuing his youthful imagination with show business as a universal metaphor, while also arranging the loss of his virginity. Served on a light cruiser during WW II, and on his discharge, his mother took him on “Arthur Godfrey’s Talent Scouts,” when he was in his mid-20s. Tied for first place and began his career in strip clubs, doing impressions and acting as master of ceremonies, while changing his last name to Bruce. In 1951, he married Honey Harlowe, a Jewish stripper and singer originally named Harriet Jolliff, one daughter from the volatile union. The duo subsequently performed together, but the marriage ended after 7 years, thanks to a mutual taste for heroin that both developed. Lived in the night-world of musicians and club performers, while he honed his edgy commentary. Arrested once for impersonating a priest raising money for a leper colony, as one of his endless scams in a largely fly-by-night life. Worked briefly as a Hollywood screenwriter, and appeared in one low budget film, Dance Hall Racket in 1958, along with his wife. During this period, his comedy turned darker and darker, taking on the tenor of jazz music, as he riffed through taboo fantasies, building on observation and character, rather than just spraying jokes. Employed his stage as a confessional, working out uncomfortable truths, and using the appropriate street language for them. That language fell under legal guidelines for obscenity and he was arrested several times for his performances, as well as his ongoing drug use. Drained by his subsequent trials, in which he saw himself as a martyr for free expression, he began to obsess in his performances about his own legal plights, while self-destructing through heroin, the narcotic of choice of his generation’s night/world. Forced to declare bankruptcy in his mid-40s, he died the following year of a heroin overdose, slumped over in the bathroom, with a needle in his arm. Wrote his autobiography, How To Talk Dirty and Influence People, the year before he died. The film bio Lenny with Dustin Hoffman, revived interest in him after his death, while “Ladies and Gentleman, Lenny Bruce,” by Albert Goldman painted a bleak picture of him as drug-addled, self-involved and hell-bent on self-destruction. Served as a touchstone for later generations of comedians, who took his freedom of expression and freedom of fantasy and were able to fly even further with it. Inner: Obsessive, compulsive, never did anything half-way. Once said, ‘I’m not a comedian, I’m Lenny Bruce.’ Overdosed on everything that brought him pleasure or escape. Undisciplined lifetime of creating himself as a totally original commentator, only to ultimately fall prey to the larger paranoia at the heart of his acute perceptions.

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PATHWAY OF THE ENTERTAINER AS CARTOONIST TURNED TV PERSONALITY:
Storyline: The playful prankster parlays a cartoonish sense of pratfall humor into a successful stint as a late nite small screen host, with a host of entertaining tricks on his guests to keep his faithful followers continually tuned into him.

Jimmy Kimmel (James Christian Kimmel) (1967) - American comedian, voice actor, musician and TV host. Outer: Of Italian and German descent. Father was an IBM executive, and both parents were devoutly Catholic. Eldest of three, with a younger brother and sister. When he was 9, his family moved to Las Vegas, where he went to high school, and, at the same time, hosted an interview show on UNLV’s college station. After a year there, he transferred to Arizona State, which he attended for two years, although never graduated. 6’1”, with dark brown hair and eyes. Launched his professional radio career in 1989, co-hosting a morning drive program. only to be fired on that job and the next, as well as three more before getting his own show on a Palm Springs, CA radio station. Married Gina Maddy, whom he had met in college, in 1988, son and daughter from the union, which ended in divorce in 2002 because of his busy schedule. Ultimately did a five year stint as “Jimmy The Sports Guy” on a popular LA morning show. Moved over to TV’s Comedy Central in 1997, and played off Ben Stein’s poker-faced monotone on “Win Ben Stein’s Money”, garnering an Emmy in 1999 for Best Game Show host. Formed his own production company afterwards, Jackhole, and subsequently enjoyed success as host of “The Man Show,” which allowed him to produce several more comedy shows, as well as produce and co-write, Windy City Heat. In 2003, he began hosting his own late-night talk show on ABC, “Jimmy Kimmel Live,” which made those searching for him online subject to cyber-attacks, because of his popular videos, in yet another prank indirectly of his making. Continued his prankster ways, including his standard sign-off, “My apologies to Matt Damon, we ran out of time.” When he finally had Damon on the show, he pulled the same stunt, which seemed to anger the actor. Has done voice-overs for several animated films, usually playing dogs, and served as host for the 64th Primetime Emmy Awards in 2012. Married Molly McNearney, his co-headwriter in 2014, daughter and son from the union, with the latter needing open heart surgery within ten days of his birth. A musician, he plays the bass clarinet, and as of 2015, had a net worth of $35 million.The following year he hosted the Emmys again, to good effect, with his mother making PB&J sandwiches for everyone and penning congratulatory notes to all the winners. In 2017, he hosted the Oscars to good effect as well, winning plaudits for both his zingers and his unflappability. Inner: Strongly identifies with his italian heritage. Quick-witted and a prankster at heart, viewing the world through the same cartoonish eyes he had his previous go-round in this series. Suffers from narcolepsy, which he controls with medication. Revamped lifetime of re-integrating himself around his sense of humor, while retaining his cartoonish view of his fellow humans, without the sulfurous temperament that earlier accompanied him. Jimmy Hatlo (James Cecil Hatlow) (1897-1963) - American cartoonist. Outer: Of Scottish descent. Father was deaf and had emigrated from the Orkney Islands, to become a printer. When his son was a year old, the family moved to Los Angeles, where his sire worked as a typesetter. Took up art in high school, and promptly dropped out after his freshman year, which deeply disappointed his progenitor, who got him a position as printer’s devil for the LA Times. Three years later, he got the job her really wanted in the art department. Began doing front page editorial cartoons, while being rejected for the service in WW I because of poor eyesight. Drafted anyway, he fell victim to the influenza pandemic, and by the time he recovered the war was over. Briefly worked in moviedom as a publicist, before laboring for an agency that represented auto dealers, which led to his becoming an editor of the SF Bulletin’s auto section, and that, in turn, led to sports and editorial cartoons. Began his cartoon feature, “They’ll Do It Every Time,” for the San Francisco Call-Bulletin in 1929, and it became nationally syndicated in 1936, eventually running in nearly 700 newspapers. The basic theme initially was hypocrisy, followed by universal aggravations, and readers often sent in ideas to him, which he acknowledged with “a tip of the Hatlo hat.” Lost his first wife when she disappeared while sailing north from South America. Married a second time in 1937 to Eleanor Dollard, and eventually moved to Monterey peninsula after WW II. One son from the union, with his wife ultimately becoming a centenarian. Forced to hire assistants because of his workload, with Bob Dunn taking over the strip after his death. Added “Little Iodine” to his cartoon stable in 1943, a mischievous redhead who appeared regularly in his feature. Added “The Hatlo Inferno” to his stable in 1953, a sadistic series of comeuppances that ran for five years. Little Iodine also had a long running series of comic books, as well as a 1946 film. A heavy smoker his entire life, he even appeared in an ad for Lucky Strikes, touting that brand as a paid pitchman, while also copiously lubricating himself with alcohol, in complete disregard for his health. Reached the peak of his popularity in the early 1950s, with collections of his works published in book form as well. Plagued by artheriosclerosis his later years, because of his bad habits. After being hospitalized for a kidney condition, he died from a stroke the following month, after returning to the same hospital. Inner: Had a terrible temper and a great need for control, despite a good sense of irony and humor. Played off of a natural human desire for recognition in eliciting ideas for his panel. They’ll do it every time lifetime of enjoying a long popular run hat belied his own profound character flaws. before returning in far better-humored form to realize a far more integrated sense of himself.


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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS COMIC IN THE KEY OF B-SHARP:
Storyline: The madcap musician plays himself into a comedic corner in his earlier go-round, and so returns with his comic and musical sensibilities sharply divided, so as to enjoy twin careers in both realms, without the one taking away from the other.

fJack Black (Thomas Jacob Black) (1969) - American actor and musician. Outer: Of Russian Jewish descent on his maternal side and Irish, Swedish and German descent on his paternal side. Father converted to Judaism after his marriage. Youngest of three, with a gay older brother, who died of AIDS and a gay older sister. Parents were communication satellite engineers who divorced when he was 10. Already doing LSD and coke by the 8th grade, he spent a year in a program for troubled youth. A rock’n’roll fan from an early age, with strong musical sensibilities, and an excellent singing voice. Attended a performance arts high school, before going to UCLA, where he joined Tim Robbins’s theater troupe, the Actors’ gang. 5’6 1/2”, overweight. In 1992, he made his film debut in Robbins’s Bob Roberts in a small role. At the same time, he befriended Kyle Gass, with whom he began writing music, before forming the mock rock duo, Tenacious D. Initially serious, their music soon turned to the satirical, as did their overweight preening take on rock idols, in a throwback to his earlier go-round in this series, once again finding an enthusiastic cult audience for his peculiar blend of expert musicianship and inspired tomfoolery. Gradually rose from comic bits playing “stony fat dudes,” to feature player in fare that never fully exploited his talent. Finally found a good vehicle for himself in High Fidelity in 2000, as a manic record store clerk, then achieved genuine stardom in 2003 in The School of Rock, which was written specifically to showcase him. Lived with writer/comedian Laura Knightley, before marrying Tanya Haden, a musician, two sons from union. Proved he could handle straight features with King Kong, then teamed with writer Mike White, to create the production company, Black & White films, whose first effort, Nacho Libre, in which he played a Mexican priest turned wrestler, proved him to be a serious contender as a heavyweight comic of the post-millennium. Won his first Grammy in 2015 as part of Tenacious D for Best Metal Performance.The same year he co-starred in the dark cable comedy, “The Brink,” as a low-level embassy official in Islamabad whose only real connection to the country is the one who supplies him with pot, until a military coup puts him at the center of a snowballing crisis, as a coward-hero in the Bob Hope mold. Inner: Largely nocturnal, with a great concern over how people will respond to him. Anxious, self-doubting, obsessive-compulsive and surprisingly shy for his blend of cocksure comedy. Nevertheless, smart and effortlessly funny. Repeat performance lifetime of compartmentalizing his talents in order to reintegrate around them, while trying to keep his own offbeat fears in harmonious check through pleasing others with his inspired antics. fSpike Jones (Lindley Armstrong Jones) (1911-1965) - American bandleader. Outer: Father was a Southern Pacific Railroad agent. Got his nickname from being as thin as a railroad spike. Grew up in the Imperial Valley. Began his career at the age of 12 as a drummer with the Jazzbo Four. Because his parents disapproved of his career path, he had his own apartment at 16, while still in high school, supporting himself by playing professionally. Preternaturally thin. Formed his own Dixieland jazz band in 1934, Spike Jones and His Five Tacks, and eventually became a recording studio session man, playing drums for various vocalists. For kicks, he and his band-mates would do outrageous takes on the hit songs of the day, using all manner of sound to undercut them, including banging toilet seats, goat brays, cowbells, belches and gun-blasts tuned to ‘C-sharp.’ Married Patricia Middleton in 1935, divorced 11 years later, one child from the union. Formed Spike Jones and the City Slickers and scored his first hit during WW II, with “Der Fuehrer’s Face,” and went on to carve a unique niche for himself as a master of slapstick sound, despite being a first-class musician. Wore loud plaid suits, and was constantly chewing gum, while brandishing a gun, which he often discharged in perfect staccato harmony, with occasional birds falling to punctuate his humor. Employed top notch musicians, who also played it for laughs, as well as a bevy of comic singers, including Doodles Weaver, George Rock, and Sir Frederic Gas, whose falsettos, barking, obscene emanations and little boy voices were well-attuned to his brand of satire. Played off the ethnic humor of the time, mocking almost every group, and won the sobriquet of ‘King of Corn,’ a title he resented. Wished also to be taken seriously as a musician, but wound up far too pigeon-holed to get beyond his limited public’s expectations, who refused to listen to his earnest efforts. Married Helen Grayco in 1948, 3 children from the union, including Spike Jones, Jr., who later led a reworking of his band. Played in films, with his band doing set pieces, and had his own radio show by the end of the decade. Ventured into TV in the 1950s, with his own eponymous show in 1954, 1957 and 1960, but the advent of rock’n’roll made his brand of humor passe. Tried a comeback with a straight Big Band, but that era was over with as well. A heavy chain smoker, doing 5 packs of cigarettes a day, he eventually succumbed to emphysema. After his death, his work was revived, and found a whole new audience. Inner: Manic, disgruntled, extremely attuned to the variations of sound, from the highbrow to the lowbrow, but never quite finding satisfaction in his successes. Harbored a strong dislike of rock’n’roll, seeing nothing in it that could be satisfactorily satirized. Different drummer lifetime of being straitjacketed by his own off-the-wall humor, necessitating a return where he could divide his talents, so that each could be given full airing, without the one drowning out the other.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS ONGOING CONCEPTUAL COMIC:
Storyline: The prankster hipster continually moves comedy well beyond its boundaries, treating it first as an improvised jazz riff and then pure performance art, as he redefines funny to both himself and an increasingly larger and more appreciative audience.

dZach Galifianakis (1969) - American comedian and musician. Outer: From a large extended Greek family. Father was a heating oil vendor. One of three children. Enjoyed a boisterous childhood, including having his older brother periodically drag him naked across the front lawn and holding him upside down by his ankles to rid him of any inhibitions. Raised in the Greek Orthodox faith, although largely irreligious. A talented piano player, he initially wanted to be an actor, but deferred to his parents’ wishes and majored in Communication & Film at North Carolina State Univ., failing his last required course by a point, in an act of unconscious rebellion, before heading for NYC. 5’8”, cherubic, blue-eyed and eventually red-bearded. Worked as a nanny, housecleaner and busboy, while taking acting lessons, before finding his true métier in performance art comedy, beginning with a routine at the back of a hamburger restaurant. Made his TV debut in 1996 in “Boston Common,” playing a stoner, then moved to Los Angeles, where he did standup wherever he could. Had small parts in several films, although his career didn’t begin to take sharper public shape until after the turn of the century. Hosted his own talk show, “Late World with Zach,” in 2002, for nine weeks on VH-1, but felt extremely restricted with the straight format, and after its cancellation, struggled for several years. A conceptual comedian to the core, he interlaces his piano-playing with his innate physical sense of comedy, to play off audience tensions around the potential angry menace seemingly lurking behind every performance. Found Comedy Central to his liking in various guises, while building up a cult following on the club circuit for his zany antics, and using the internet and its video-sharing sites to cement his brand of indie comedy into the woof and warp of an audience looking to be shocked and surprised. Came to greater attention via The Comedians of Comedy, a 2005 documentary about like-minded absurdists, which firmly established his off-the-wall reputation. Did a series of ads for Absolut vodka, in 2008, in a red wig, in which he volcanoes into sheer rage in an absurdist setting, which would prove highly effective in selling the product, despite its anti-commercial essence. Parlayed his unique talents into big-budgeted Hollywood fare by 2009, and remains a work-in-progress, constantly looking to get under the skin of his audience. in 2010, he lit up a marijuana joint on cable TV, breaking broadcast precedent, while raising his trickster presence in popular culture exponentially. Wed longtime girlfriend Quinn Lundberg, the cofounder of the charity, Growing Voices, and some 13 years his junior, in 2012. Gave up alcohol in 2014, and lost between 50 and 60 lbs, but not his sense of humor. Inner: Silly, but with a sense of darkness about his loopy take on life. Likes to go where people feel uncomfortable, as a comic route, and is totally fearless about the material he uses, despite his own private terror of heights..= Subterranean Greek theater lifetime of delving ever deeper into his angry and absurdist comic sensibilities to see if he can bridge the difficult divide between niche and mass audience acceptance. dLord Buckley (Richard Myrle Buckley) (1906-1960) - American comedian. Outer: Father was an English immigrant. Mother was a gifted storyteller, and part indigenous American. Made his Northern California appearance two weeks before the great San Francisco earthquake. Grew up in a mining town, then worked as a lumberjack, before teaming up with a guitarist to do a musical comedy act on the medicine and tent show circuit. Wound up in the speak-easies of Chicago during the 1920s, and by the 1930s, had his own club, Chez Buckley, after gangster Al Capone (Pablo Escobar), who liked his insulting style with the customers, backed him. Appeared as Dick Buckley with a variety of shtiks, while always feeling a sense of protection around his increasingly outrageous act, although eventually was run out of town by the vice squad. Ran dance marathons the next decade, while also doing vaudeville, offending one-and-all and smoking marijuana on stage. Married several times, the last in the 1940s to Elizabeth Hanson, a dancer, son and daughter from the close union. Returned to Chicago, and worked with many of the jazz greats of the era, which led him eventually to his own inimitable storytelling raps, delivered to syncopated beats. Toured with columnist and pop impresario Ed Sullivan’s USO show during WW II, and appeared on the former’s very first TV “Toast of the Town,” in 1948. Arrested numerous times for marijuana possession, a stimulant he enthusiastically embraced, with Sullivan proving a benefactor there as well in getting him off. During the 1950s, after failing to break into films, he finally found his unique niche, as a performance artist, well before that genre had inculcated itself into American culture. Redubbed himself Lord Buckley, Lord of Flip Manor and Royal holiness of the Far Out, and began using the syncopation of jazz in his monologues, as well as his own sound effects, enjoying cult status among his fellow performers, with his routines on Jesus, “The Nazz,” and Mohandas Gandhi, “the Hip Ghan and his spinnin’ wheel,” as well as Willie the Shake, among others. Refashioned an accent that was part black and part BBC, and peopled his monologues with a make-believe royal court of equally absurd names. Managed to capture many of his routines on records, to immortalize himself in the minds of those too young to hear him in the flesh. Sported a pith helmet and velvet capes, while becoming more and more uninhibited in his behavior, seeing his life as an upbeat musical interlude. Once marched 16 nude people through the lobby of the Royal Hawaiian Hotel. Lived in Los Angeles in a shack he dubbed “The Crackerbox Palace,” while founding “the First Church of the Living Swing,” America’s first jazz church. Nomadic by nature, he spent his final years in Las Vegas, and then San Francisco. Went on his last tour in 1960, and after falling ill in Chicago, he continued on to NY, only to see his cabaret card confiscated by the city’s vice squad, on the grounds he lied about his previous arrest record. Subsequently suffered a fatal stroke brought on by extreme anxiety, malnutrition and kidney problems. Two days later, a huge to-do occurred between NYC’s culterati and its finest, resulting eventually in the abolition of the card system 7 years later. Lives on through his records, and has been an influence in the lives of both musicians and comics ever since. Inner: Eccentric, joyous and word intoxicated, in what he would call “hipsemantics.” Great lover of life, living it to his own peculiar hilt and lilt, without any sense of responsibility around himself or others around him. Hipster lifetime of turning himself into an absurdist musical dialectician to the delight of a small, but discriminating audience, only to ultimately play himself out around authority’s deaf ears.

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PATHWAY OF THE ENTERTAINER AS CONFLICTED COMEDIENNE:
Storyline: The Busy Bee hostess shows an affinity for controversy in her scathing political and social commentaries, after earlier playing straight-woman to a Depression-era comedian known for his own sense of exaggeration.

Samantha Bee (1969) - Television hostess, comedian, producer, writer, actress, media critic, and political commentator. Outer: Of Irish and British descent. Her parents separated shortly after her birth, and she was raised largely by a grandmother, who worked as secretary at the Catholic school she attended. 5’7”, and slim with dark brown hair and light brown eyes.. Unsure of what she wanted to do when she finished high school, she went to McGill Univ., which she found unsatisfactory before transferring to the Univ. of Ottawa, where she discovered her affinity for performing, after earlier thinking she would become a lawyer. After getting her BA in theater, she enrolled in the George Brown Theater School in Toronto, while supporting herself for five years as a waitress. Began her professional career doing commercials. before becoming one of the four founding members of the Atomic Fireballs an all-female comedy troupe. Married fellow Canadian actor Jason Jones in 2001, two daughters and a son from the union. Became the first non-US correspondent on “The Daily Show,” in 2003, where she did satirical interviews. Also did some acting on the small screen in several TV series, as well as small roles on the big screen. In 2010,, she penned a memoir, “I Know I Am, But What Are You?” Followed it up in 2016 with “Cracking Up.” Along with her husband, she became an American citizen in 2014. Left “The Daily Show” in 2015, and the following year she started hosting “Full Frontal with Samantha Bee” on TBS, a once-a-week half-hour comedy series, to become the first female host of a late-night satirical news show. It would quickly catch on with a mostly young audience of nearly 4 million, allowing her to move into an expensive co-op in NYC. Unpredictable in her opinions, she has also shown a curious insensitivity in some areas, so as to make her a perfect reflection of the angry divisive times in which she lives. Has won several Canadian Comedy Awards and has a net worth of $2.5 million. Inner: Noted for aggressive sense of comedy and take-no-prisoners commentary, with a curious insensitivity to certain issues. Liberal in her political views, but not afraid of complimenting conservatives when the occasion calls for it. Also capable of cruelty in her wit, with an abiding anger behind it. Bee-ing There lifetime of taking her comic sensibilities up to a whole other level in order to reflect a nation struggling mightily with itself over who and what it wishes to be. Marian Jordan (Marian Irene Driscoll) (1891-1961) - American actress and radio comedian. Outer: Of Irish descent. Father was a coal miner. 12th of 13 children. Gave music lessons and sang in her Catholic church choir as a teenager, where she met her future husband Jim Jordan. The two were wed in 1918, son and daughter from the union, with the former also pursuing a show business career. Following her spouse’s release from overseas service in France, the two entered the new medium of radio in 1920, performing shows and working around her native Peoria. By 1927, they were working for a Chicago station, beginning with the “Luke and Mirandy” farm report, in which her husband played a farmer given to fabricating tall tales, while she played his ever-suffering wife. More radio casts would follow in which they played variations on those characters. The show went national in 1933 when it was picked up by NBC. Along with another writer, the duo struck gold with “Fibber McGee and Molly” continuing the former’s penchant for tall tales and hers for playing the ever-patient spouse engaging in hare-brained get-rich schemes and endlessly antagonizing their neighbors and friends. Their antics made the show a huge hit during the Great Depression and beyond, finally ending in 1959, after TV largely killed radio comedy. Gave several phrases to the language, including, “T’ain’t funny, McGee,” and “That ain’t the way I heard it.” Their stuffed “closet” routine, in which one of them opened a closet door and an avalanche of items loudly fell out, also became a classic. Did four films together playing their characters, while she battled alcoholism in the late 1930s, entering rehab for it. By 1953, she was feeling extremely fatigued, although fought against cutting back on work, and instead broadcast the show from their home. By 1958, she had contracted inoperable cancer, and a replacement actress had to be found to play Molly McGee. Died at home of cancer, and her husband remarried a year later, although the two would ultimately be buried together. Elected to the Radio Hall of Fame in 1989. Inner: Dualistic, with her inner self unintegrated with her outer comedic personality.. Two-sided lifetime of trying to find some sort of balance between her own self-destructive tendencies and a desire to make the public laugh and forget its own troubles.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS SMART-MOUTHED LASS:
Storyline: The jaundiced Jewish American Princess is silenced by a lisp in act one of her serial career, and more than compensates for it in act two, as an equal opportunity offender with absolutely no inhibition about her choice of target.

dSarah Silverman (Sarah Kate Silverman) (1970) - American comedian. Outer: Of Polish and Russian Jewish descent. Her mother, Beth Ann Silverman, was George McGovern’s campaign photographer in 1972, and a local theater company founder. Father was a former social worker who became a retailer with a discount outlet called Crazy Sophie’s. Youngest of 4 daughters. One sister became a feminist rabbi, another an actress, and the third a screenwriter. 5’6”, dark-haired and dark-eyed. Made her stand-up debut in Boston at 17, then moved to NYC where she attended NYU, before dropping out in favor of open mike nights at various Manhattan clubs, which led to her becoming a fulltime performer at comedy clubs around the country. Began her national career with the 1993-4 season of Saturday Night Live as a writer/performer, although was fired after one season, when none of her bits ever aired. Despite being deeply upset by the snub, she continued as a sketch performer on cable TV with a couple of different shows, while establishing her unique performance persona, through her outrageous byplay around ethnic and religious stereotypes, seemingly advocating prejudices as a way of mocking them. Although she has played small parts in a number of films, her medium of choice is TV, in which she has far more freedom to develop her comic riffs. Hooked up with TV comedian Jimmy Kimmel in 2002, which would provide subsequent comic fodder for both, as well as back-and-forth separations, renewals and splits, and has continued as a high profile performer, appearing on any number of shows, sometimes in character, sometimes as herself, and occasionally as an award show host, while always stirring the pot with her off-the-wall commentary. In 2005, she released Sarah Silverman: Jesus Is Magic, a filmic record of her stand-up comedy act. Got her own eponymous cable show in 2007 on the Comedy Channel, with her sister Laura as a regular cast member. In 2008, she sponsored the “Great Schlep” viral video campaign to get young Jews to come to Florida to persuade their reluctant grandparents to vote for Barack Obama for president, which also got her a multi-million-dollar book deal, and a subsequent best-seller, “The Bed Wetter,” although her show was cancelled after 3 seasons, despite a Twitter campaign to save it. In her 2017 Hulu series “I Love You, America,” she bridged the gap twixt the two major political parties by looking at the humor in their differences, rather than the hostilities. Has a net worth of $12 million. Inner: Like many funny people, subject to clinical depression, using prescription drugs to combat it. Refuses to marry until everyone, regardless of their sexual orientation, is given the same accord. Big fan of Jerry Lewis. Second chance lifetime of finding a public voice, after earlier being denied it, and riding it for all the outrage and mischief she can muster, as a cheeky commentator on the foibles and prejudices of her times. dJobyna Ralston (Jobyna Lancaster Raulston) (1899-1967) - American actress. Outer: Mother was a portrait photographer who had dreams of a show business career for her daughter. Probably the same maternal figure as her succeeding go-round in this series. Named after Amazonian actress Jobyna Howland (Sigourney Weaver). Made her stage debut in 1909 in Cinderella, then went to acting school in NYC, before becoming a chorus dancer and singer on Broadway, beginning with Two Little Girls in Blue. 5’1” with a large-eyed pleasing beauty. Brefly married a childhood friend. When French comedian Max Linder (Jerry Lewis) saw her on stage, he convinced her to go to Hollywood. Made her debut in 1919 in Starting Out in Life and appeared in several of his films. Caught the eye of comedy director Hal Roach, who starred her in several of his one reel comedies. Her mother’s failing vitality convinced her to make Hollywood her financial mainstay in order to pay for her mounting health care. In 1923, she began working with silent comedy star Harold Lloyd, and their partnership in a half dozen films over the next 5 years would prove the highlight of her professional career. Able to employ her beauty and expressiveness as a perfect foil for him. Also did dramatic fare, co-starring with Richard Arlen in Wings, the first Oscar winner in 1927. Married him, one son from the union, Richard Arlen, Jr., also an actor. When talkies came in at decade’s end, however, her lisp curtailed any further work, and her career summarily ended in 1930. Spent the rest of her life in retirement. In 1945, she divorced her husband, and wound up the victim of rheumatism. Suffered a series of strokes during the last five years of her life, and died of pneumonia in a motion picture home for retired performers in an extremely sad coda for someone who had brought laughter to many much earlier on. Inner: Fey spirit, whose larger ambitions were frustrated. Silenced beauty lifetime of falling prey to a slight defect, before coming back with a vengeance and an outrageous mouth to more than compensate for fate’s unkind treatment of her.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS ZANY SUPPORT TURNED MULTI-HATTED LEAD:
Storyline: The former foil elevates herself from scatterbrained caricature to full-blown comedienne, employing all her skills to become a mother of comic invention for those Gen-Xers and Millennials following her on the various laugh tracks of her times.

Amy Poehler (1971) - American actress, comedian, producer and writer. Outer: Of Irish ancestry on her maternal side and English, German and Portuguese descent on her paternal side. Mother was e high school teacher, father was a financial planner. The older of two with a younger brother who became an attorney and Swedish sit-com star. Raised Catholic, but not particularly religious. 5’2”, with blonde hair and blue eyes. While at Boston College, she joined “My Mother’s Flea Bag,” a sketch comedy group, and after graduation decided to pursue a career of making people laugh. Moved to Chicago in 1993, and joined Second City and the Improv Olympic, where she got further improvisational training. Three years later she became part of the Upright Citizen’s Brigade, which relocated to NYC and turned itself into a half-hour sketch show on Comedy Central for a three season run, while also establishing a theater of the same name, where she would continue to perform, both in NY and LA. Joined the cast of “Saturday Night Live,” in 2001, and quickly rose to become one of their regularly featured performers, in the middle of her first year, only the third cast member to be accorded that honor. Did a host of impressions while joining Tina Fey as a co-anchor of Weekend Update in 2004, and continuing on after the former’s departure, while remaining close friends with her, with both important trailblazers around women and TV comedy. Able to make the easy transition into film with Mean Girls in 2004, and Baby Mama, four years later, while marrying comedian Will Arnett in 2003, two sons from the union, which ended in a long separation, and then an amicable divorce in 2013, largely because of conflicting work schedules, despite appearing together in several films, including Blades of Glory. Stayed with SNL until 2008, while also producing a web series, “Smart Girls at the Party” and co-creating and producing, “The Mighty B” a Nickelodeon show. In 2009, she helped launch “Parks and Recreation,” the following year, playing the perky lead, Leslie Knope, a mid-level bureaucrat of the parks department of a fictional Indiana town, which garnered her a Golden Globe win for Best Actress in a TV Comedy Series in 2014, despite mediocre ratings throughout its multi-season run, which ended in 2015. Co-hosted the 2013 Golden Globes with Tina Fey, showing precisely why the two have done so much to elevate women’s comedic presence on TV. Wrote and directed several episodes, then, along with her brother Greg, became executive producer of his transplanted sit-com, “Welcome to Sweden.” In 2014, she published her mid-career memoir “Yes, Please,” written because she said, 'I'm too old to get by on being pithy and cute,” and like her it’s funny, and spiritually ambitious as well as messy and slightly indulgent. Along with Tina Fey, hosted her third Golden Globe awards in 2015, with well-received monologues, skewering those who needed skewering. Inner: Unafraid of taking chances, and able to easily slip into a host of characters with chameleonic insight into all of them. Staunchly liberal Democrat, and a pioneer of sorts, allowing women to be themselves in the comedy realm, instead of mere fodder for crass male- jokes. Sly-witted sisterhood is powerful lifetime of bringing her game up to the next level, as a multi-hatted creator of a variety of entertainments geared towards empowering the comediennes who have followed her. Gracie Allen (Grace Ethel Cecile Rosalie Allen) (1895?-1964) - American comedienne. Outer: Of Irish Catholic extract. Some question as to her actual birth year, since the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire destroyed all records. Preferred the later date of 1902, which appears on her crypt, although all indices point to either 1895 or 1896. Father was a song and dance man who abandoned the family when she was 5, and she never mentioned him again. The youngest of four sisters, along with an older brother. Made her show biz debut at the age of 3, then, along with her three sisters, she began performing Irish folk dances, with the quartet billing themselves as “The Four Colleens.” Accidentally spilled some boiling water on her arm as a child, and had a scar ever afterwards, which prevented her from wearing strapless gowns. Convent educated, and on graduating, she rejoined the family troupe. 5’1”, with two different colored eyes, one blue, one green. Continued as a vaudeville performer until a dispute with her stock company head made her think her show business career was over at 18. Went to secretarial school in NYC, before viewing a vaudeville act in NJ that was splitting up, thereby meeting her life’s partner, George Burns in 1922. The two decided to form a comedy act, with herself as the comic foil to his droll wit. She had been affianced to another at the time, and after four years, she agreed to be partners with him on every level, after he gave her an ultimatum, marriage or nothing. The duo said their “I do’s” in 1926, one adopted son and one adopted daughter from the extremely close union. Burns quickly discovered that her delivery continually got laughs, and switched roles with her, with himself playing straight man to her zany responses. The duo toured extensively, with modest success before becoming a hit act on radio in 1932, with various running gags, that would allow them cameo appearances on other shows. Did some shorts, as well as features throughout the 1930s, essentially playing herself. Wanted to retire to a private life during this time, but knew her husband wished to continue their combined success. Their act morphed into a situation comedy in 1941, with the duo playing a married show business couple, negotiating ordinary domestic problems. Ran for President on the Surprise Party ticket as a running gag in 1940, replete with whistle-stop tours. Switched over to TV in 1948, as part of the CBS stable, using the same format of playing themselves. Forced to retire in 1958 because of migraine headaches and a heart condition. Spent her last few years caring for her family, gardening and painting. Died of heart failure in her sleep at home. Her spouse never remarried and visited her grave monthly, and when he died as a centenarian, he was buried below her in a family crypt, because he wanted her to have top billing. The words “Together Again.” appear on their dual final resting place. Inner: Kind, generous, domestic, private and humble. Never gave an interview as herself, always staying in scatterbrained character. Never gave the same performance twice, either, since she didn’t ever feel she was performing. Didn’t think she was funny, despite a sly wit of her own. Very concerned with fair play, and loved the Kennedys, although kept her political convictions to herself. Performance artist lifetime of showing the public a scatterbrained character which she never deviated from, while taking her role as wife and mother far more seriously, as a conventional, but quick-witted matron of her time.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS YIDDISHE MAMA TURNED SHIKSA SHTICKSTER:
Storyline: The introverted extrovert opens herself up to the larger world of comic characterization after earlier limiting herself to extensions of her own life, in a bid to expand her keenly observant sense of the ordinary taken to its absurd extremes.

Kristen Wiig (1973) - American actress and writer. Outer: Of English and Scottish descent on her maternal side, and Norwegian and Irish on her paternal. Mother was an artist, while father owned a lake marina. One older brother who is mentally disabled. Grew up in Rochester, NY, and when she was 9, her parents divorced. Always had a elfin sense of humor, while maintaining an extremely close relationship with her sibling, delighting in his endless innocence. Close with her mother, as well. After high school, she went to the Univ. of Arizona as an art student. Despite being shy and insecure, she took an acting class, and overcame her fear of audiences. 5’5”, slender, with a malleable face. Upon graduation, she was hired by a plastic surgery clinic, to do post-surgery drawings, but impulsively decided instead to hie herself to Los Angeles and pursue acting. Spent several years doing odd jobs, including catering and selling hot dogs at a mall, while eschewing formal acting classes, taking only one. After catching a performance of the improv group, the Groundlings, she auditioned for them and was accepted, creating a potpourri of characters derived from her extended period of oddball employments, and her keen eye for comic foibles. After Saturday Night Live producer Lorne Michaels caught her act, she was hired midseason during its 31st year, and moved to NYC on a week’s notice, making her debut in 2005. The same year she married actor Hayes Hargroves, whom she divorced in 2009. Continued to develop her Groundling characters, while adding a host of others, including the one-upping Penelope, the batty Gilly and the Target clerk, while doing a host of impressions of real-life figures. Soon became the most frequently used cast member, and by 2008 was its senior female lead. Made her scene-stealing film debut the previous year in Knocked Up, before starring in a number of popular comedies, including Adventureland and Bridesmaids, which she co-wrote. In addition, she has done voice work in cartoons, including the TV series, “The Looney Tunes Show.” After 7 years, she finally bid adieu to SNL in 2012 in an emotional send-off in order to pursue her film career fulltime. Teamed with Will Ferrell in 2015 for a take-off on Lifetime Channel’s overwrought melodramas, “A Deadly Adoption,” to excellent comic effect, while also busily appearing in a host of films, including a full frontal exposure in Welcome to Me, the tale of an unbalanced lottery winner. Part of the 2016 all-female remake of Ghostbusters, which received rave reviews in most quarters save for some chauvinist male carping. Inner: Impulsive, and extremely health conscious. Doesn’t like to rehearse, preferring to keep her performances organic, while using her own fears as a means of keeping herself grounded. Despite her aggressive and often manic portrayals, she remains the same introvert she always has been in her private life. Continually tries for reality in her delineations, playing off of exaggerations that have a highly identifiable core. Wiiged out lifetime of expanding her comic reach, through a keen sense of observation, and an equal feel for everyday inanities, while dealing with a host of fears and insecurities geared towards bringing out her underlying talent for farcical exaggeration. Gertrude Berg (Tilly Edelstein) (1898-1966) - American actress, writer and producer. Outer: Of Polish Jewish descent. Father ran a Catskill Mountain resort catering to Jewish clientele. An only child, she attributed her sense of humor to her paternal grandfather, an immigrant from Poland. When she was a teen, her father took over a boardinghouse in the Catskills, where her mother supervised the kitchen and did the books, while she entertained guests by writing and performing skits. It was there she met her husband, Lewis Berg, a chemical engineer, with an expertise in sugar technology. The duo wed in 1918, and for a while lived on a Louisiana sugar plantation. Son and daughter from the close union. Took extension courses in playwrighting at Columbia Univ., and also wrote for the Jewish Art Theater. When her husband started suffering business losses, she began appearing on radio in a Yiddish commercial for a cookie mix, which launched her acting career. In 1928, she penned a radio script about two working-class sales girls which had a short run. The following year, she found her niche, with a dialect comedy, “The Rise of the Goldbergs,” which had her as its star, after she performed for the radio executives in her selling of the show to them, and they insisted she play the central character. The effort instantly found its audience, and was soon on the air five days a week, in fifteen minute installments, until 1934. In it, she played Molly Goldberg, the ultimate Jewish mother, basing the character on both herself, and the immigrants she knew from the Lower East Side. The show gradually morphed into character studies, rather than dialect humor, while many of the players who appeared on it were not even Jewish. Used the show for topical references to the plight of European Jews, while underlining the hope that all immigrants had in finding better lives for themselves in America. Seen during the decade as the country’s second most beloved woman, behind the president’s wife, Eleanor Roosevelt. Wrote screenplays as well, while a second series based on her resort experiences failed, before she received a five year, million dollar contract to both write for and star in a continuation of the “Goldberg” series, which maintained its audience, in their identification with the various situations the family faced in their assimilation to American life. Its second run lasted nine years, making it when of the longest surviving series in radio his’n’herstory. In the process, she became one of the first women to serve as a writer and producer for radio, and later TV. Very active during WW II with the fate of European Jews during the Shoa. Presented the Goldbergs on Broadway in 1948, and the following year, she made an easy transition to TV, while the show’s opening line, delivered while leaning out a window, “Yoo hoo, Mrs. Bloom,” became her calling card and a national catch-phrase. Also extolled her sponsor’s product through the window at show’s end, establishing an extremely personal rapport with her audience through that simple device. Won a Best Actress Emmy in 1950, although her husband on the show, Philip Loeb, fell victim to the anti-Communist hysteria of the time, causing the show to lose its sponsor and go off the air for a while, before briefly returning on another network, and ultimately ending its run in 1954. The following year, Loeb committed suicide, because of his blacklisting. Continued working on Broadway, winning a Tony in 1959 for “A Majority of One,” playing a Jewish widow romantically involved with a Japanese widower. Did more filmwork, with one more failed sit-com on her resumé, in 1961, on an eponymously titled show featuring her as a late-life college student. The same year she co-authored her memoir, with her son, “Molly and Me,” attributing her success to her early hotel experience, and its teaching her how to accommodate people’s needs. Did one comedy album, “How to be a Jewish Mother” in 1965, while also writing songs. While preparing for a starring role in The Play Girls, she had a heart attack and died in a Manhattan hospital. Inner: Warm, humane and driven to succeed. Served as a living embodiment of the humanity of ethnic second generation America, while putting an extremely positive spin on a much maligned people, who were viewed with extreme suspicion during her active years. Always tried to realistically portray the life she knew, feeling it was impossible to improve on reality. Yoo hoo America lifetime of employing her considerable gifts to publicly explore her private world through the universal anodyne of humor in order to bring a broader understanding of the hyphenated-American experience.

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PATHWAY OF THE ENTERTAINER AS INOFFENSIVE HUMORIST:
Storyline: The cherubic comic parlays his sense of being a straight man into late night revelry as a host who tries not to offend anyone, unlike his fellow sharp-tongued talk show cohorts.

Jimmy Fallon (James Thomas Fallon, Jr.) (1974) - American comedian and TV host. Outer: Of mostly Irish descent, with some German and a touch of Norwegian through his maternal side. His father was a Vietnam veteran, who sang doo-wop on street corners as a teen, before becoming a machine repairman. Both parents were over-protective of him and his sister, and he, in turn, is extremely close to them. Loved “Saturday Night Live” as a child to the point of obsession, and knew he wanted to pursue a show business career, after earlier thinking he might become a priest. Went to Roman Catholic schools, while also showing proficiency on the guitar, allowing him to compete in talent contests, while earning the reputation of a non-rebellious class clown. 6’, slim, with dark brown hair and dark brown eyes. Matriculated at the College of St. Rose in Albany, while also performing in comedy clubs, which led him to drop out just shy of graduation in order to move to Los Angeles to pursue comedy. Returned to NYC in the late 1990s, and auditioned for “SNL”, joining the show’s cast for the 1998-1999 season. Specialized in impressions of both film stars and r’n’r luminaries, as well as creating a host of characters, including a boy-band member. Co-hosted the show’s recurring “Weekend Update” with Tina Fey, as well. Left SNL in 2004 in order to pursue a film career, only to have mixed results in various pairings with established female stars. Did a little better with straight drama on both the large and small screen. Married Hollywood producer Nancy Juvonen in 2007, two daughters from the union. Found his true calling in the spring of 2009, when he took over from Conan O’Brien’s late-night talk show. “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” initially aired in 2009, and he had Robert de Niro, who he used to imitate, as one of his first guests. It took him a while to find a rhythm with his spoofs and stunts, but when he did, his boyish charm and quirky sense of humor found its audience appeal. In 2013, he took over the helm of the long-running “Tonight Show,” when longtime host Jay Leno’s contract expired, and it was looking for a younger audience. The “Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon,” moved back to NY and debuted in February of 2014, to become the number one show of its kind in its time slot, although his more abrasive rivals would slowly cut into his audience. Hosted the Golden Globes in 2017, in flat manner, although was invited back to repeat the gig. Finally got political later that year, with a moving plea to stand against hate, following a clash in Charlottesville, Va. between protestors and white supremacists. Has a net worth of $35 million. Inner: Despite his successes, always gets nervous before going on. Charming and easy going, with the ability to draw out his various guests, thanks to a basic sense of honesty. Thoroughly enjoys his fans, and being in the limelight. Sweet-natured clown lifetime of enjoying both his fame and good fortune, as a figure who has the capacity to both love himself and others. Ole Olson (John Sigvard Olsen) (1892-1963) - American comedian and musician. Outer: Father was a Norwegian immigrant who became a boiler=maker for the railroad. Mother was of Swediah-German descent. Brother Steve Olson also became an actor. Graduated Northwestern Univ. and financed his education by playing the violin in a dance band. When a pianist in the quartet in which he was appearing quit, he was replaced by Chic Johnson (Bill Hader) and the duo quickly formed a musical/comedy act. Married and later divorced Lillian Clem, a son and two daughters from the union, along with another daughter who died in infancy.. The son J.C., went into show business, only to later commute suicide. The Olson and Johnson duo added performers from their families, as well as sight gags and props to their act, and quickly became a top vaudeville attraction during the WW I era, with him playing straight man to his partner’s antics. Toured the country throughout the 1920s, with the mid-west as their anchor. Did some radio, and in the 1930s, had a long-running hit Broadway musical revue called “Hellzapoppin’” in which they ran up and down the aisles in addition to appearing on stage, in a wild melee of slapstick humor. The show also became a successful film in 1941. The duo appeared in several other slapstick films through the 1940s, before returning to Broadway. Seriously injured in a 1950 automobile accident, which left him partially crippled, and like Johnson suffered from kidney problems. Ended his active career playing himself on the small screen, while his music and lyrics continued on after his death, mostly in uncredited fashion. In 1961, he married Eileen Maria Osthoff, a dancer and choreographer. Died of kidney dis-ease soon after Johnson, and the family had them buried in adjoining plots. Had “may you live as long as you laugh and laugh as long as you live” inscribed on his tombstone. Inner: Able to maintain a harmonious partnership with Johnson by seeing each other as little as possible when they weren’t performing together. Basically a lowbrow comedian, with lots of mugging and slapstick shticks, which appealed to the audience of his time. Zany lifetime of dedicating himself to making people laugh and feel good, although his personal existence did not reflect his public life, necessitating a more integrative return to heal his various partnerships.


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PATHWAY OF THE ENTERTAINER AS SLAPSTICKER TURNED SUBTLE ARTIST:
Storyline: The madcap mimic expands his repertoire from low-brow farce to creating a host of unique comic characters as a large talent on the small screen

Bill Hader (William Hader) (1978) - American comedian, writer and producer. Outer: Of German, Danish, Irish and English ancestry. Mother was a dance teacher, father managed an air freight company, among other jobs, while also working as a sometime stand-up comedian. Knew he was destined for a career in the entertainment industry from early on. Worked after school in order to make low budget shorts. 6’1” with blue eyes and dark brown hair. Following prep school, he briefly attended the Art institute of Phoenix before moving to Los Angeles. Did some production work, before joining the Second City Los Angeles improv Troupe, which led to the sketch comedy crew, Animals of the Future. Auditioned for Saturday Night Live, and became a cast member in 2005, creating a host of characters, including Stefon, a NY club correspondent and Vinny Vedecci, a faux Italian interviewer, to go along with his other spot-on imitations. Married filmmaker Maggie Carey in 2006. Three daughters from the union. Appeared in numerous high-grossing films as a support including 2007’s Superbad, and 2008’s Forgetting Sarah Marshall, as well as serving as producer on the long-running comedy cartoon show, “South Park.” Left SNL in 2013 in order to relocate in Los Angeles and further his career on both the large and small screen. Has a net worth of $8 million. Inner: Well-socialized, highly likable and hyperactive, with an excellent sense of what makes people tick, allowing him his dead-on impersonations. Great love of old films, along with his desire to be part of comedic his/story. Spot-on lifetime of taking his skills up a whole other level after his earlier go-round of slapstick clowning in order to weave his persona into comedy’s rich his/story. Chic Johnson (Harold Ogden Johnson) (1896-1962) - American comedian and musician. Outer: Of Swedish descent. Some question emains about his true birthdate, with some sources giving 1891. Stocky and eternally giggling. Studied classical piano at the Chicago Music College, before dropping out to become a ragtime pianist at a local vaudeville house. Used the nickname ‘Chic’ as a nod to his native Chicago. Around WW I, he married Catherine Valentine Creed, two daughters from the union, which lasted until his death The oldest, Junie May, became an actress. Replaced a member of Ole Olsen’s (Jimmy Fallon) quartet and the duo decided to form a musical comedy act, proving extremely popular, particularly in the mid-west area, beginning in 1914. The duo was billed as “Two Likable Lads - Loaded with Laughs.” Served as the jokester, while Olsen was the straight-man. Signed a contract with Warner Bros. to provide comedy for some of their musicals in 1930, although musicals were soon out of favor, and they returned to the stage and live performances. Reached a peak in 1938 with “Hellzapoppin’” on Broadway, which featured their manic comedy, and it became one of the longest running shows in the his/story of the Great White Way, racking up over 1400 performances, with their physical gags and byplay with stooges in the audience. Made a movie version of it in 1941, which satirized the film industry, and he went on to play in a number of comedies during the decade. Did more theater as well, although the duo failed to find a popular venue on the new medium of TV. Had a farm north of NYC, which he used to relax on. Died in a hospital of kidney dis-ease while on vacation in Las Vegas, and when Olsen passed on the following year, the two families arranged that they be buried together. Inner: Able to maintain a harmonious partnership by seeing each other as little as possible when they weren’t performing together. High-spirited and good-humored, with a natural bent for uncouth comedy. Lowbrow lifetime of playing to simple tastes, before returning in far more subtle fashion in order to broaden his sense of comedy for more discriminating audiences.

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PATHWAY OF THE ENTERTAINER AS BESPECTACLED TRANSOCEANIC PUNDIT:
Storyline: The four-eyed funny man brings his droll perspective to American shores and proves to be aspot-on critic of his adopted country after earlier being a citizen of said-same with a similar sense of its comic absurdity.

John Oliver (John William Oliver) (1977) - British comedian, writer, producer, actor and TV host. Outer: Of English and Irish descent. Parents were both teachers. Grew up in a suburb of Birmingham, and initially wanted to be a professional football player, but also loved watching comedy. After attending a comprehensive school, he studied English at Christ’s Church College, Cambridge, although preferred doing stand-up comedy to his studies. 6’ medium build and bespectacled with brown eyes and black hair, and a distinctive working-class Brummy or Birmingham accent, along with other Merseyside influences. While there, he met Richard Ayoade, who became his writing partner, as the duo joined the Cambridge Footlights comedy troupe. Continued performing stand-up after graduating university in 1998 around England, and finally began getting notice following the turn of the century. In 2004, he teamed up with Andy Zaitzman to create “Political Animal,” a radio show, which led to a regular guest spot on BBC’s “Mock the Week,” the following year. In 2007, in his first trip to the U.S., he was chosen to be “The Daily Show’s” senior British correspondent. Played with prevailing stereotypes, as a critic of American culture and proved quite popular. In 2007, he rejoined Zaltzman to do a weekly political satirical podcast called “The Bugle” Made his big screen debut in The Love Guru in 2008, then joined the series, “Community.” playing a professor. Declined a full-time contract to continue with “The Daily Show.” In 2011, he wed Iraq War medic and political activist Kate Norley, who has continued working with veterans groups. One son from the union. Subbed for Jon Stewart in 2013 and was so well-received, he was given his own show on Comedy Central, “Last Week Tonight” in the spring of 2014. Some speculation existed that he would take over for Stewart when the long-time host announced his impending retirement the following annum, but he wound up signing a longer term contract for his own show, and has remained at its helm, employing his droll humor and astute political sensibilities. As such, he established a church, Our Lady of Perpetual Exemption, in his spoofing of prosperity televangelists and their cries for seed money, and it elicited a host of donations, as well as bags of beef jerky and seeds. Won his first Emmy in 2016 for Best Variety Talk Show, and his second the following year for the same. Became the first late night talk show host to slam Harvey Weinstein for his sexual depredations, and the motion picture Academy for its hypocrisy around him. Has a net worth of $2 million. Inner: Amused that Americans find his working-class accent posh. Feels America is in its fat-Elvis years, reflecting the bloated semi-dysfunctional condition of the former superstar, who could still give knock-out performances. Emotionally repressed, although capable of an occasional good cry. Stand-up and sit-down lifetime of bringing his droll wit to foreign shores as a commentator and elucidator of the outrageous inconsistencies of American political thought and action. Raymond K. Knight (William Raymond K. Knight, Jr.) (1899-1953) - American writer and comedian. Outer: From a middle-class background. Slim, cerebral and bespectacled. Originally pursued law at Boston Univ., and passed the bar, before deciding to return to school and study theater and writing at Harvard and then Yale. Performed in a Broadway musical review, “The Manhatters” in 1927, while penning both programs and commercials for NBC. Asked in 1929 to come up with something zany, he created “The Cuckoo or KUKU Hour,” performing on it as Prof. Ambrose J Weems, which gave him the opportunity to comment on current events. Proved to be a pioneer of sorts in radio satire, since he entered it without a vaudeville background like most of his fellow performers. The KUKU Hour proved so unique that NBC didn’t know quite how to handle it, and after a few seasons, he took the show to Mutual. One of its elements was “the Firing Squad,” where the audience would shoot at people or ideas he mentioned with toy cap guns. Subsequently took over the children’s series “Wheatenaville Sketches”, playing the editor of a small town newspaper. in 1935, he contributed sketches to a Broadway musical revue, then three years later, he penned “Run Sheep Run,” which had an extremely brief run. In 1941, he created the radio serial, “A House in the Country,” which ran for a season, and in which he took a small role. Became the national production manager for ABC during WW II, and also contributed to a variety of magazines. Married Lee Peppers, a model and future TV director, who was more than a quarter century his junior. Two daughters from the union, which ended with his relatively premature death. His final credits included being the chief writer for Bob Eliot and Ray Goulding, and their off-beat “Bob and Ray Show.” Died on his birthday, and Bob Elliot wound up marrying his widow. Inner: Witty, charming satirist, and a pioneer in bringing topical satire to radio. Had an anarchic comic view of things, and served as a model for a number of satirists who followed him on the radio. KUKU lifetime of bringing his unique brand of humor to the American public, while serving as both mentor and model for those with a similar satiric bent who followed him.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS RAUNCHY BOUNDARY PUSHER:
Storyline: The cutting edge comic switches genders in order to explore both her sexual self and the violence inherent in male attitudes towards some women, as a skewering taboo-buster eager to take on the inanity of pop culture.

Amy Schumer (Amy Beth Schumer) (1981) - American comedian and writer. Outer: Of Ukrainian and Polish Jewish descent on her paternal side and Protestant on her maternal side, with an admixture of English, German, Scottish and Welsh. Related to NY Sen. Charles Schumer. Great-grandmother was a bootlegger. Father owned a baby furniture company. Oldest of three, with a sister, Kimberley who is a comedy writer and producer as well as her road manager, and a brother, Jason Stein, who is a musician. Raised Jewish in a privileged milieu until her progenitor’s business went bankrupt when she was 9, and he was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. Her parents divorced when she was 12, and she was raised by her mother on Long Island in reduced circumstances, where she was a class clown, and where she used her acute sense of humor to cope with what life had thrown at her. 5’7”, with blonde hair and blue eyes. Moved to Baltimore after graduating high school, and got a BA in theater from Towson Univ. in 2003 before returning to NYC and studying at the William Esper Studio for two years, while supporting herself as a waitress and bartender. Did theater, while also beginning her stand-up career in 2004, appearing on “Last Comic Standing,” and eventually advancing to the finals of its fifth season. Co-starred in the Comedy Central reality show “Reality Bites Back” in 2008, and made other guest appearances, as well. Had her first Comedy Central special in 2010, followed by more TV roles as well as a trio of independent comedies in 2012. The year before she released her debut comedy album, “Cutting.” Using sex as central to her routines, with her claim, “My pussy if magic,” she launched a multi-season sketch comedy series for Comedy Central in 2012, which won a Peabody award in 2014 for her amiably profane and distinctly feminine view of pop culture. Able to tackle large topics, such as college rape and Hollywood’s marginalization of older actresses through her spot-on satire. Hosted the 2015 MTV Movie awards, and, despite feeling she wasn’t pretty enough to star in her own movie, she did so with Trainwreck in 2015, playing a commitment adverse career woman. Although it received mixed reviews, it did decent box office. However, much to her heartbreak, it served as a cinematic backdrop for a theater shooting in Lafayette, Louisiana that saw two female victims and the shooter killed in yet another senseless display of mindless public gun violence. The same year, she won an Emmy for her hit variety series, “Inside Amy Schumer.” Posed nearly nude for the 2016 Pirelli calendar as a statement she is finally proud of her body and looks. At the same time, she published a memoir, "The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo,” in which she revealed her mother had an affair with her best friend’s dad, which ended her parents marriage, and also limned considerable abuse she received from an ex-boyfriend, in a series of poignant essays limning her life so far. Inner: Doesn’t feel the need to dominate her shows, by appearing in every skit. Instead, she is able to navigate tricky territory without ever losing sight of the inherent humor in everything. Somewhat insecure about her looks, despite her mother’s earlier assurances she was beautiful. Seen by many as the funniest person on TV. Comic relief lifetime of switching over to her female side in order to explore the full scope of gyno-humor with a dark wit built on dealing with an up-and-down childhood and a sublime confidence in her ability to make people laugh uproariously. Bert Wheeler (1895-1968) - American comedian, writer and actor. Outer: Lost his 17 year old mother as a baby and was raised by his father and aunt. Always knew he would be an actor. At 16, he left for NYC to begin his vaudeville career. 5’4”. Married Margaret Grae in 1915, with whom he worked as a team. Divorced eleven years later, no children from the union. By 20, he was appearing at the Palace Theater, and three years later he was the featured comedian in the “Ziegfeld Follies of 1923.” In 1927, he began working with Bob Woolsey (Rick Moranis), and the duo debuted together in the Broadway show “Rio Rita.” Their comic chemistry was a delight to audiences, as they took on the archetypes of the sap and the wise guy. rather than the usual straight man and comic foil. At the end of their show’s run in 1929, RKO Radio Pictures signed them to do the film version, as they added Dorothy Lee to their mix in a dozen more films. In 1928, he married actress Bernice Speer, one daughter from the union, who died the same year he did. Finally began thinking of themselves as a team, in their second feature, The Cuckoos, as the first comedy that rose out of the talkies rather than the silents. Uneven in many of their films, intermixing solid comedy with highly predictable fare, while learning how to perform without a live audience reacting to their material. By 1930, they were among the biggest comedy stars of the time. When RKO separated them, the subsequent features did not fare well. On being re-teamed, they did some of their best and most inventive work, reaching a pinnacle between 1931 and 1935. During this period, they rebelled by switching studios to Columbia for one film and were rewarded with a much higher contract. New writers, however, couldn’t maintain the quality of their earlier work, and they, in turn, reflected that by turning in lackluster performances. In 1937 he wed actress Sally Haines,.only to divorce two years later. In the interim, Woolsey died of kidney dis-ease and a liver ailment in 1938. Continued to work sporadically in films, on stage and in TV, but was never able to achieve the same success he had with his partner. In 1940, he wed Patsy Orr, divorced a decade later. His fifth and final marriage was to Olga Rieman, in 1951, a former vaudeville singer, who died two years before he did. Suffered failing health, as well as financial difficulties in his final years. Died of emphysema, two weeks after his singular offspring passed away from cancer. Inner: Played a sweet, naive, almost childlike character who was constantly eating while romantically dreaming of his ideal mate. Far more effective a comic duo than a single, as his career without Woolsey steadily declined. Unsuccessful in most of his romantic partnerships, since his focus was on his outer career, rather than his intimate life. Teamed up lifetime of successful and sometime highly inventive comic partnership before switching genders on his return, to explore his largely unintegrated female side.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS SKEWERING MIMIC AND CUT-UP:
Storyline: The ongoing openly gay funny woman loves to make the dislikable endearing through her cogent characterizations that get right down to the insane essence inside of them.

Kate McKinnon (Katherine McKinnon Berthold) (1984) - American comedienne and actress. Outer: Of Scottish descent on her maternal side and German descent on her paternal side. Father was an architect and amateur drummer who died of brain cancer in 2002. Older of two sisters, with sibling Emily Berthold a video editor. Played several instruments as a child, and also performed in dance recitals and plays, while relishing both theater and film, with a desire to make entertaining others her life’s work. A gifted student as well, she matriculated at Columbia Univ. where she majored in theater. 5’4”, blonde-haired and blue-eyed. While still in college, she was hired as part of the cast of the Logo network’s Big Gay Sketch Show in 2006, and stayed with it for its full 5 season run. Did several other TV series as well, including “Vag Magazine.” in 2012, she became part of the Saturday Night Live crew as its first openly lesbian member since the 1980s. Showed a gift for mimicry, with numerous celebrity impressions, including her idol Ellen DeGeneres, as well as a devastatingly ferocious take on Hillary Clinton. Has worked as a voice actress in several animated series while also appearing with Upright Citizens Brigade Theater in NYC. Has also done a number of one-woman shows, including “Disenchanted” and “Best Actress.” Began doing films in 2014, with a brief but memorable bit in Life Partners, then followed with with Intramural in 2015, playing a screeching wacko, with her usual insane aplomb helping to build a large laugh out-loud fan base for her out-and-out comic zaniness.. In 2016, she was part of an all-female remake of Ghostbusters, which was well-received for the most part, although struggled to break even at the box office.The same year she won a supporting comedy Emmy for her work on SNL Inner: Low-key in person, preferring to put her off-the-wall sensibilities into her creations rather than herself. Loves to play completely clueless unsell-aware characters, while making unlikable people endearing. Madcap lifetime of being who she is in a far more tolerant time, after earlier having her Hollywood career curtailed for her openness about her preference for intimacies with her own gender. Patsy Kelly (Bridget Sarah Veronica Rose Kelly) (1910-1981) - American actress, dancer and comedienne. Outer: Parents were Irish immigrants. Nicknamed Patsy by a brother. initially wanted to be a fireman, but was trained as a dancer instead, and was good enough to teach it at the dancing school she went to. Began tap-dancing in vaudeville in 1912, and within three years began serving as Irish comic Frank Fay’s (Andy Samberg) comic foil, for a trio of seasons in vaudeville. Appeared in a string of musical revues afterwards. 5’4” with dark brown hair and eyes. Made her Broadway debut in 1928, and appeared in several of producer Earl Carroll’s “Vanities” musicals. Declared herself a “dyke” during the 1930s, at a time when any alternate sexual stance was looked at with horror. Lived with actress Wilma Cox, and announced she had no intention of ever getting married. Made her screen debut in the early 1930s in a short, then starred with Thelma Todd (Goldie Hawn) in a series of 35 comedy two-reelers, swapping one-liners with her, which cemented her image as a wisecracker with the ability to deflate pompous characters. After Todd’s murder, she joined with Lyda Roberti (Bette Midler), but she, too, died prematurely in 1938. When the genre waned, she began appearing in full length features in support roles, playing identifiable working-class characters in both comedies and musicals, although her openness about her sexual orientation probably curtailed her film career. Began drinking heavily and acting erratically, often ejected from nightclubs, so that by 1943, her Hollywood days were largely over and she returned to NYC where she worked in radio on variety shows and did summer stock and nightclubs, while also serving as a personal assistant and caretaker to flamboyant actress Tallulah Bankhead (Drew Barrymore), with whom she claimed to be intimate. Bankhead would subsequently help her return to her career. Did sporadic films and some TV during her last decade, making guest appearances on a variety of shows, ranging from action to drama to comedy. Appeared as a coven member in Rosemary’s Baby in 1968, along with several other show business older stalwarts and returned to Broadway in 1971 in a revival of “No, No, Nanette,” which rewarded her with a Tony for Best Featured Actress in a Musical as a tap-dancing maid. Did several more comedies in the latter half of the 70s, Suffered a stroke, that caused her to lose her speech, which ended her career, and went into a nursing home to undergo therapy. Died of cancer at the Motion Picture & Television Country House and Hospital and was buried with her parents. Inner: Sassy, consummate ad-libber, with a quick wit and good sense of timing. Excellent comic foil, and soft-hearted for all her hardboiled cynical manner in the characters she created. Well-liked by everyone she knew. Wisecracking lifetime of being made to suffer for her honesty and openness, despite an endearing talent to entertain, and an inner sensitivity that her outer acerbic shell hid well.


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PATHWAY OF THE POET AS ALIENATED SATIRIST:
Storyline: The former literary luminary returns in outlawed form to give an extra edge to his off-the-wall outlook on his contemporary world after earlier displaying a blazing wit, albeit far less awareness of the larger political sphere.

Trevor Noah (1984) - South African comic, writer, producer and TV host. Outer: Born during apartheid in South Africa, making his entrance into the world a criminal one. Mother was half-Jewish and black, father was white and Swiss German. The latter could not be listed on his birth certificate, nor could he acknowledge him on the street, and eventually abandoned the family, without ever officially marrying. Named by his mother after her favorite movie star, John Travolta. Oldest of three brothers, and estranged from his biological father for a long time. Raised in poverty in his maternal grandmother’s house, while showing his sharp sense of humor from early on, thanks in part to a gift for mimicry. Mother worked in a chemical factory and insisted on both discipline and an education for him, although there was no money to send him off to a good school. Learned to speak six of the 22 official languages of South Africa, as well as German. Eventually, his mother married a black South African, before divorcing him in 1996, although the two continued to live together, despite his abuse, often beating her with bicycle chains. Almost killed by his stepfather at 25, after the latter had shot his mother in the face, leaving her for dead, although she survived. 6’1”. Before that he got a job at a local TV station to begin his career in comedy. Followed it up with a role on a South African soap opera, and then began hosting his own radio show, “Noah’s Ark.” More hosting duties would follow in South Africa, before he began focusing on comedy, with specials, such as “That’s Racist” and “Trevor Noah: African American,” which gave him an American audience. His comedy tour, “Born a Crime,” also brought him considerable notice, and in 2012, he became the first South African stand-up comic to appear on “The Tonight Show.” More American TV appearances would follow, and he was able to take his act around the world. After only appearing three times on “The Daily Show,” he was made a surprise choice in 2015 to replace Jon Stewart when the latter steps down during the second half of the year, and almost immediately afterwards, his insensitive to replace Jon Stewart when the latter stepped down during the second half of the year, and almost immediately afterwards, his insensitive tweets about both Jews and women brought him unwanted publicity, although they didn’t lose him his choosing, as Stewart defended him. Inaugurated his run in late September with comedian Kevin Hart as his first guest, while seamlessly showing himself initially to be a continuation of his predecessor, thanks in large part to the same stable of writers. Proved himself a wry outsider with his view of America, steadily getting more comfortable balancing insights with humor. In later 2016, he published his memoir, “Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood,” with a particular emphasis on his fiercely religious mother, and the strength she imparted to him. Has a net worth of $13 million. Inner: Deliberately tries not to offend, using his humor to bring out the many ironies surrounding his life. Discovered early on, that his outsider status was softened when he learned to speak like a whole host of people, so as not to appear a complete alien. Views South Africa as his home, despite a longtime resentment against his mother for never considering emigrating from there. Born a crime lifetime of coming into extremely strained legal circumstances, and dealing with it via a combination of his wit and a mother who instilled a strong sense of discipline within him, to became an influential comedic voice of his times. Sir P. G. Wodehouse (Pelham Grenville Wodehouse) (1881-1965) - English/American humorist, lyricist and short story writer. Outer: From an old Norfolk family, with earls and barons in his background.. Father was a British judge in Hong Kong. Third of four sons. Born in England, then lived briefly overseas with his parents, before being sent back to Britain and placed in the care of a nanny at 3. Went to a variety of boarding schools over the next dozen years, while seeing his parents a total of six month during all that time. Loved to write from an early age, and spent his free time with aunts around the countryside, which would feed into his later love of characterization of eccentric older women. Went to Dulwich College, where he excelled at both sports and scholarship, editing the school magazine, and participating in its theatrical productions, while also playing both rugby and cricket. Instead of going on to university, his father found him a position as a banking trainee in London, in preparation for an overseas post with the Hong Kong and Shanghair Bank. Had no interest in it, and continued writing in his spare time, before sending articles to the Evening Globe. Contributed items to a variety of periodicals, as well as school boy magazines, penning stories based on public school life. Also wrote lyrics to songs and moved to NYC’s Greenwich Village in 1909, where his stories earned him far more than in London. Remained there, and became a regular contributor, under several pseudonyms, to American periodicals, while collaborating on a host of musical comedies, with five shows on Broadway in 1917, and some 33 all told during his career. In 1914, he married Ethel Wayman, a twice-over widow, whose second husband had committed suicide over bankruptcy in 1914. Speculation exists that he was impotent and the union was never consummated, despite his wife being quite lively, flirtatious and extroverted. The duo maintained separate bedrooms and often lived apart, while she had a host of lovers, as well as a daughter from one of her marriages. Became famous with his tales of the valet Jeeves and the wealthy but foolish and foppish Bertie Wooster, whom the former was always saving. Able to play off familiar types with exaggeration, winning plaudits from his fellow writers for both his style and his comic genius. Split his time between the U.S., Britain and France, with the later country serving as a tax haven for him, while showing himself to be totally unconscious about the political turmoil engulfing Europe. In 1940, he was captured by the Germans in Le Touquet and sent to an internment camp in Upper Silesia. Because of his age, he was released under condition he remain in Germany. During this time he was asked to make broadcasts, which he did, and though he neither supported Germany or criticized England, he was roundly condemned by his countrymen as a sympathizer with the enemy, and being indifferent to the U.K. Regretted his decision afterwards, although could no longer abide living in Great Britain and moved to the U.S., becoming an American citizen and never returning home, despite periodically expressing a desire to do so. Continued penning stories, and was awarded a Knight of the British Empire for his efforts, much to his great delight, shortly before his passing, with his wife accepting the honor. Died of heart failure in a hospital and was buried in the U.S., with his wife, who outlived him by nine years, eventually buried beside him, His books would continue to remain in print, and the Bollinger Everyman Wodehouse Prize would be issued annually in his honor for the best example of comic writing in the UK. Ultimately penned nearly 100 books, including novels and collections of short stories, as well as musical comedies. Inner: Skilled weaver of plots, and a craftsman around language, with a penchant for happy endings after many a twist and a turn in his stories. Made almost no mention of sex in either his autobiography or his works. Curiously indifferent to politics and the larger world, much preferring his own inner mischievous take on his immediate environs Politically incorrect lifetime of humorous disassociation from the larger realities of the world, thanks in no small part to parental disconnection and a need for self-protection through humor, which would ultimately lead to his being estranged from his native land, a stance he would continue to pursue in his next go-round in this series. Sir Thomas Pelham-Holles, 1st Duke of Newcastle (1693-1768) - British Prime Minister. Outer: Family was middling Sussex gentry, until the head of house married into large land holdings in the midlands and the north. Mother was the sister of the Duke of Newcastle, who died when her son was 18 and left vast estates to him. Father was a baron, who married twice, producing both him and his younger brother, Henry Pelham (Harriet Harman) who followed him into politics. 8th of 11 children, with five daughters surviving Educated at Westminster and Clare Hall, Cambridge, although did not graduate. Added the name Holles to his own in 1711, per the request of an uncle who bequeathed him his estates.On the death of his sire in 1712, he succeeded him in his peerage and estates, to become one of the wealthiest landowners in the kingdom, with estates in 11 counties, which enabled him to influence many elections. Became the first PM to spend his entire parliamentary career in the House of Lords, taking his seat shortly after his 21st birthday. Vigorously upheld the Whig party on the death of Queen Anne (Princess Anne) in 1714, and championed the Hanover dynasty’s King George I (Prince Charles) as her successor, despite his speaking no English. Made Duke of Newcastle-on-Tyne in 1715, and a knight of the Garter in 1718. Married Lady Henrietta Godolphin, grand-daughter of the Duke of Marlborough (JFK) the same year, although the union produced no children because of his wife’s poor health. Nevertheless, the connection with her family brought him even more prestige. In 1724 he was chosen Secretary of State by the Walpole (Joschka Fischer) administration, holding that post for the next 30 years, while he and his sibling were two of the most powerful politicians in Parliament, particularly after Henry became PM in 1743. On his brother’s death, in 1754, he succeeded him as Prime Minister, but people were so used to him in his former position, that he ceded it in 1756 to the Duke of Devonshire (Hugh Carey). Became prime Minister again in 1757, although proved a far more effective statesman than party leader. Following the death of George i in 1760, and the reign of his son, George III (Jeffrey Archer), he found himself out of kingly favor, and supplanted by the latter’s favorite, the Earl of Bute (Eugene McCarthy), sending him into opposition, only to lose posts for opposing the peace of 1763, ending a bi-continental war with France in Europe, India and North America. Found himself increasingly isolated, losing important allies to death, while failing to achieve his hoped for role of elder statesman and adviser to succeeding ministries. Two years later he became Lord Privy Seal for a few months, only to begin his final decline. Suffered from a persistent cold and cough, and had a stroke, while taking the waters at Bath. Returned home and died shortly afterwards. Ultimately left office some £300,000 poorer than when he entered it, after twice refusing a pension. Inner: Industrious and energetic, which made up for his so-so leadership skills. Also neurotic and engaging, as well as an incorrigible string-puller and manipulator, making up for his lack of capability with patronage and influence peddling. Realization lifetime of coming to see that the political realm per se was not for him, as he went on to explore his expressive talents in go-rounds to come in this series.


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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS LIGHT-HEARTED HEAVYWEIGHT:
Storyline: The jocular jester adds several hyphens to her growing repertoire, while still retaining her outrageously out-sized sly-witted sense of self.

Rebel Wilson (Rebel Melanie Elizabeth Wilson) 1986) - Australian comedienne, writer, producer and entrepreneur. Outer: Of British and Irish descent. Parents were professional dog handlers. The family constantly traveled, selling canine products from a caravan, which she felt was comparable to carnie life. Shy as a child, while extremely observant, allowing her a depth of characterization to her future roles, based on her acute personal perceptions. One of four children, all with unusual names. Academically oriented in high school, with a penchant for math. Graduated from the Univ. of New South Wales with a degree in law and theatre in 2009, then served as a Youth Ambassador for Australia in South Africa. Contracted malaria there, and in a feverish hallucination saw herself winning an Academy Reward, which induced her to take to the stage. Studied at the Australian Theater for Young People, where she created and starred in her own comedy theater productions. 5’4”, blonde-haired and overweight. Made her small screen debut in 2003 in the series “Pizza,” playing a girl gang leader. Continued to do both TV and film work Down Under, before winning a scholarship with the Second City Training Centre. Beforehand, she launched her own fashion line, “Fat Mandi” with fattening foods pictured on her T-shirts. Moved to NYC, and got her breakthrough role with Bridesmaids in 2011, playing a roommate from hell. A series of well-received films followed, including the 2012 musical comedy, Pitch Perfect. Hosted the 2013 MTV Movie Awards, and has been a presence on both the large and small screens ever since, including playing the lead role in “Super Fun Night,” which she created and starred in, before its cancellation after one season. Settled in Hollywood with her Bridesmaid co-star, British comedian and screenwriter Matt Lucas, who has expressed a clear sexual preference for his own gender. In 2015, she showed up in angel wings for the MTV Movie Awards, replete with THINK write in larger letters on her bottom, to remind young women it’s their brains and not their bodies that really count. Alleged in 2017 that an “obsessed” and “jealous” former schoolmate sold her out to “Woman’s Day” magazine to make a “quick buck”. Initiated a defamation suit against the magazine’s publishers, claiming her career was damaged when the publisher painted her as a serial liar. Has a net worth of $16 million. Inner: Distantly related to Walt Disney. Loves doing American accents, although claims it hurts her face. Witty, and comfortable within her large frame, feeling women should care a whole lot less about what they look like. In that vein, continually uses her body as a source of comedic material, which annoys some critics. Rebel without a pause lifetime of bringing her acute intelligence to the fore, while continuing to serve as an amusing totem for those women who are far less than physically perfect in their over-all corporeal make-up. Totie Fields (Sophie Feldman) - American comedienne. Outer: Of Jewish descent. Father was a shopping center owner. Took her first name from a childhood corruption of Sophie. Began singing on local radio stations at the age of 4. Graduated to the Borscht Belt in her early teens, where she entertained guests between acts, and by 20, was an MC at a Boston club, a usually male prerogative at the time. 4’10”, and overweight. In 1950, she married fellow comic George William Johnston, who became her musical director, two daughters from the union, including Jody who became director of the Rainbow Company, a troupe of child actor’s with many of them handicapped. Child-bearing caused weight gain, which she incorporated into her act, in self-deprecating manner, taking on dieting and self-love as two of her comic themes, while proudly accepting her body. Made her small screen debut on the Ed Sullivan Show, and continued to appear on it, making her one of the first nationally known comediennes. Appeared often on talk shows, and did occasional TV series, while making fun of her physical difficulties as a way of showing her audiences that if she could laugh in the face of pain, so could they. Her last two years, she survived the amputation of her left leg above the knee, as well as two heart attacks during recovery from the latter, and a mastectomy on her right breast, while continuing to bounce back and resume her career following each personal catastrophe. Just before a two week Las Vegas stint, she was stricken by a blood clot at home and was rushed to a hospital, where she died of a pulmonary embolism. Inner: Spirited, sassy, and full of shtiks. Always upbeat, using herself as a means to elevate audiences, while treating them as intimates. Ever-optimistic, and a glass-ceiling breaker for all the female comediennes who followed her. Follow me lifetime of empowering both herself and her audiences through self-confident self-mockery and a genuine appreciation of her being, physical flaws and all.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS SEMI-AUTOBIOGRAPHER:
Storyline: The comedic chronicler uses early overwhelming neurotic fear to draw forth her countervailing creativity, which has allowed her to become an entertaining voice for her feisty female urban generation
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Lena Dunham (1986) - American actress, director and producer. Outer: Of Russian Jewish descent on her maternal side and basically British descent on her paternal. Mother, Laurie Simmons, was a Guggenheim Fellow, designer and photographer who used dolls and ventriloquist dummies in her interior, domestic shots. Father was a conceptual painter, given to both abstraction and figurative renditions. The former was Jewish while the latter was Protestant. Older of two sisters. A hypochondriac and germophobe as a child, she suffered from obsessive compulsive disorder, along with extreme anxiety, which she wound up taking low dosage medicines for. Admitted to being afraid of virtually everything when young, which brought her into therapy, and eventually, with professional help, she was given a much stronger sense of self. 5’3”. Graduated Oberlin College in 2008, majoring in creative writing, with the desire to become a poet. While there, she also filmed three shorts. A year after college, she did a web series, “Delusional Downtown Divas,” using her experiences in the art world as material, and earned a cult following with it. Despite never taking acting lessons, she proved a natural in front of the camera with bit parts, before playing the lead role in 2010 in her own short,Tiny Furniture, bringing both her mother and sister into the cast of the low budgeter, which she shot in her family’s apartment for $45,000. Two years later she launched “Girls” on cable, writing, directing, executive producing and starring in the hit series, which earned her a Director’s Guild award, the first woman to be so honored. Employs events from her own life in the storyline, which follows the NYC adventures of a bunch of uninhibited young white women, with herself assaying the role of a writer working as a barista. Won two Golden Globes in 2013 for her efforts both in front of and behind the camera, while enjoying wide popularity for her efforts. in addition to her TV and film work, she is also the author of an essay collection entitled “Not That Kind of Girl,” in which she admitted to some sex play with her younger sister when both were children. The admission heated up the right-wing, which charged her with molestation, amusing her to sue the site that accused her. In organizing an 11 city book tour around it, she auditioned via videotapes for seven warm-up acts as prelude to her promotional appearances which were accompanied by other writers and comedians, in order to turn a conventional happening into a circus of sorts, with herself as imaginative mistress of ceremonies, although received criticism for not paying anyone, which she later rectified. Her revelations about her and her sister, however, caused her to cancel at least two stops. Also given the back of the hand on the net earlier for racially insensitive statements. A political liberal, she insists she will not get married until same-sex unions are legalized. Raised eyebrows when she compared her dog to her Jewish boyfriend, guitarist Jack Antonoff, interspersing their traits. Remains a continual target of the rightwing for virtually everything she says and does as their idea of womanhood at its worst. As a fervent Hillary supporter, she gave a speech along with America Ferrara at DNC, which began, "Hi. I'm Lena Dunham, and according to Donald Trump, my body is probably, like, a 2.” Also announced this would be the last season of “Girls.” Made four trips to the emergency room with various health issues in 2016, while making public plaint plaint she never had an abortion, but wished she had, in an egregious display of disconnect from the political reality of her time. The following year, she joined the cast of the 7th season of “American Horror Story.” Has a net worth of $12 million. Inner: Self-absorbed and self-aware with the facility for universalizing her experiences, and also constantly putting her foot in her mouth. Has a self-admitted strong apology addiction. Unafraid of exposing her far less-than-perfect body as an emblem of pride in who she is, while also capable of creating equally strong male characters, thanks to a perceptive feel for her peers. Canny, witty and acutely observant. Emblematic lifetime of rising to the level of generational totem, after a fear-filled childhood geared to ultimately give her the confidence to be exactly who she is. Irene Ryan (Jessie Noblett) (1902-1973) - American actress. Outer: Mother was irish born, father was stationed in the army at the time of her birth, and several months was sent to San Francisco, where she grew up. One older sister by 17 years. Began her career at 11, winning $3 for singing “Pretty Baby” at an amateur talent night. At 20, she married writer/comedian Tim Ryan, and together they became a double act in vaudeville. She played the dimwit foil in their “Time and Irene” act. Shot a number of shorts with him in the 1930s, and eventually did features for Monogram Pictures. Appeared on radio as well, before divorcing her husband in 1942. No children from the union. Toured with Bob Hope’s troupe during WW II entertaining the overseas soldiers, while appearing on the latter’s radio show. Continued with her film work, as a support character and in 1946, she married Harold Knox, who worked in film production. The union produced no children and ended in divorce in 1961. Played nervous, fussy women in a number of films, then began appearing on TV, beginning in 1955. After numerous slots on the small screen, in 1963, she achieved her best remembered role as the pipe-smoking, rifle-toting, matriarch of the Clampett clan, Granny, in “the Beverly Hillbillies.” Her ultimate dream was to appear on Broadway, and in 1972, she did so, helping create the role of Berthe, a regal but lusty medieval grandmother in the musical “Pippin.” The following year she suffered a stroke during a performance of “Pippin, and, on being hospitalized, it was discovered she had an inoperable brain tumor. Died of a stroke in a hospital, but not before setting up an actor’s scholarship fund in her name for promising young theater students. Proved to be one of the few entertainers to span the entire gamut of 20th century entertainment, from vaudeville to TV. Inner: Well-liked and born to entertain. Traveled the world giving benefits, with a special feel for soldiers. Extremely charitable and giving. Born to perform lifetime of experiencing everything the 20th century had to offer in the entertainment industry, before becoming a unique voice of her subsequent millennial generation.

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