www.4DBios.com

MUSICIANS - CROSSOVER CLASSICISTS, BEATLES & ROSSETTIS & ROLLING STONES

PATHWAY OF THE MUSICIAN AS STORMING SPIRITUALIST:
Storyline: The volcanic virtuoso allows his interior to roil and rage in his ongoing unsettled relationship with himself, while transmuting his unfocused inner passions and anger into transcendental sound, by following the beatific beat of his uniquely different drums.

Van Morrison (Sir George Ivan Morrison) (1945) - Irish singer songwriter, instrumentalist and producer. Outer: From a working-class Protestant background. Grew up in Belfast as an only child, where his mother was a jazz and opera singer and his father, a shipyard worker, collected blues and jazz records. Both would later operate a record store in California, as well as encourage his musicianship. Largely self-taught, he learned to play saxophone, guitar and harmonica in high school, then ended his formal education at 15 to concentrate on music. 5’5”, red-haired and plump. Joined a rock group called the Monarchs and toured Europe, playing U.S. military bases in Germany, where he acted the part of a German jazz musician in a film. Deliberately avoided eye contact with his audiences, focusing totally on his unique rearrangements, so as to be far less a showman than a pure performer, devoid of a stage personality. Returned to Belfast and opened the Rhythm & Blues Club, then formed a group called Them, and learned the blues from a tour with pioneer R & B stars. Took Them to play the west coast of the U.S., only to wind up exhausted from one-nighters, and discouraged with the music business, as Them quickly broke up. Stopped performing for a while and returned to Belfast, before moving to the U.S. in 1967. The following year, he married divorced actress Janet Rigsbee, whom he dubbed Janet Planet and employed as his muse. One daughter from the union, Shana, who later performed with him. The duo divorced n 1973, when his wife could not deal with his ongoing rage and reclusiveness. Began his real recording career in the late 1960s, after becoming a solo act, fashioning his romantically mystical vision on a series of well-received albums, including “Astral Weeks,” followed by “Moondance,” showing a completely original fluidity to his sound, and a refusal to compromise in the slightest n his acute aural vision. Lived in Marin County in California during the 1970s, while fusing folk, rock and jazz into both acoustic and improvisational fare, creating a small but sophisticated fan base totally attuned to his ingenious renderings. Never a superstar because of his noncommittal performing style, but always a highly unique musician with a total command of his medium. Plagued by stage fright throughout his career, with an equal propensity for storming off in mid-set if he felt he had been affronted. His later albums would be a reexamination of his Celtic roots, as well as his intense spirituality. Maintains homes in London, northern California and northern Ireland, while continuing to explore his anger and mystical esthetic through his brilliant musicianship, which has maintained its impeccable standards throughout his career. Inducted into the Rock’n’Roll Hall of Fame in 1993, and a decade later was given a similar inclusion into the Songwriter’s Hall of Fame, in addition to the host of awards he was won, as well being given an OBE. Married Michelle Rocca, a Dublin socialite and model, and had a daughter and son with her, while keeping their relationship largely hidden from public view, in keeping with his shrouded private existence. In 2009, his former tour manager, Gigi Lee, a Texan, had a son of the same name by him, which he vehemently denied and threatened suit over. Following her premature death from cancer in 2011, which reportedly devastated him, the wall of secrecy around his private life further eroded, much to the shock of his fans, while he remained silent in the face of the disharmonious particulars surfacing around him. To add to his losses, it was later revealed the son died several months prior to the mother. Has a net worth of $90 million. Inner: Indifferent showman, painfully introverted at times, but living in an era that demands public lives of its recording artists. Media-shy, extremely evasive with the press, unwilling to reveal himself in any other sphere than his lyrical compositions. Deep Celtic sense of mystery and wonder, highly spiritual, with a belief in music as his redeeming pathway to grace. Great passion for African-American rhythms combined with a strong allegiance to traditional Irish music, and tremendous respect for the musical integrity of old bluesmen. Angry, mystical, asocial, and a curious lookalike to his last go-round in this series, both facially and in the rhythm of his name. Dualistic lifetime of exploring the musicality of his own voice, as well as reluctantly exposing his private self through public performance, while unconsciously taking on the rage, violence and conflict of his native city as his foundation for re-creating his roiling interior into transcendent lyrical beauty. Ludwig Van Beethoven (1770-1827) - German composer. Outer: Father was a handsome, albeit mediocre musician with an angry disposition and a strong taste for alcohol. Mother was the daughter of a cook, who had earlier been widowed. A brother of the same name had been born the year before him, only to die at six days old. Became the oldest of three surviving brothers, with two sisters and another brother dying in infancy. Raised in poverty in a difficult household because of his progenitor’s intemperate temper, while his mother supposedly never smiled, although was a tender woman at heart. His sire had fantasies that his gifted 2nd son was another Mozart and began giving him a grueling musical education on the violin. Had several second-rate teachers and gave his first public concert at 8, although he was billed as only 6. After a further attempt at exploitation failed when he was 11, he dropped out of school, and the rest of his education was gained through his own reading and the influence of friends. Quickly learned all he could from his first decent teacher and became his official assistant as court organist when he was 14. 5’5” and thickest with a big pockmarked face, and an unkempt appearance, highlighted by eyes that shone with a prodigious force, planted over a permanent melancholic expression. Went to Vienna at 16, where he played for boy wonder Wolfgang Mozart (Stevie Wonder) who was very impressed by him, then returned home for his mother’s death the following year, which deeply affected him. Took on 2 pupils from a cultured patrician family and was introduced to a more sophisticated milieu through them. With the steady dissipation of his father, he became head of his own family, receiving half his salary. Invited by leading musical light Joseph Haydn (G.W. Pabst) to come to Vienna to study with him, after the older man had leafed through some of his compositions, and was well-received by the Viennese aristocracy. Began his lifelong Vienna stay in an attic, but soon found himself in a princely palace, where he was treated as a son by the royal couple. Haydn proved an indifferent teacher, so he sought his lessons elsewhere. Constantly moving, sometimes supporting several apartments at once, while suffering from chronic abdominal pain, and living in filth. Enjoyed starting his day by wandering around the city with a sketchpad. Despite his difficult personality, he had a host of loving support and a horde of friends because of his obvious genius. Brought his brothers to Vienna after his father’s death, and fought for custody of his nephew following his brother Karl’s early demise, although was not particularly geared towards fatherhood. Discovered to his horror in his late 20s that he was starting to go deaf. Kept his affliction a secret, and only a strong sense of his own musical destiny kept him from killing himself. Extremely original, he worked in most musical genres, as the ultimate romantic composer, giving an emotional intensity to his work rarely heard before or since. At 40, greater deafness set in, but he continued to write, hearing the music internally, all the while suffering from ringing ears and earaches. Grew increasingly irritable and volatile, magnifying casual incidents into full-blown insults. Sought to arouse and disturb his listeners, not placate them with beautiful noise. Strongly sexed, although never married. Continually falling in love, and proposing marriage to a number of women, only to be rejected each time. Allegedly fathered a child by a lover, who became mentally ill at 4 after an illness, and never saw him again. Passed away during a violent thunderstorm, rising from his bed and shaking a fist at it, a fitting epitaph to his careening emotionality. Thought to have died of cirrhosis of the liver or possible syphilis, but much later DNA tests on his hair, showed he suffered from lead poisoning. His funeral attracted thousands. Wrote opuses by the score, works for piano and voice, songs, symphonies and sonatas, but only one opera, Fidelio, which needed to be revised several times, before finally finding an audience. His works divide neatly into 3 periods: the first under the influence of Mozart and Haydn, the second a fifteen year stretch from 1800 to 1815, in which he composed his major popular works, and the third his final dozen years, in which he wrote his memorable Ninth Symphony and his last 5 string quartets, as well as Missa Solemnis. Ultimately created a remarkable oeuvre that has remained the mainstay of performance artists ever since. Inner: Proud, irritable, hypochondriacal, with a violent temperament and a deep-seated sense of his own genius. Intense, strong willpower, boorish and prone to rages, as well as profound depression. Felt himself the equal of any and all nobility as a king in the creative sphere of music. Generous and extravagant, with little real sense of money. Dirty, disorderly, with a great love of humanity in his music, but not his life. Continually editing his work, never quite satisfied with it. Thunderously passionate lifetime of directly channeling his emotional intensity into his extraordinary musical esthetic, and despite support and success, carrying a profound unhappiness that eventually embraced the heavens in its marvelous musical unfolding. Johannes Brahms (1833-1897) - German composer. Outer: Mother was a needleworker to whom her son was unusually devoted. Father was an impoverished double bass player. The middle of three children, with an older sister and younger brother. Learned the elements of music from his the latter, then continued his education with other teachers, who were impressed by his interest in form. Chose the piano as his instrument of expression. His sire wanted him to tour America as a teenager, but his teachers felt he would be better served by continuing to study. Gave his first public concert at 14, playing a program of Beethoven and Bach, unconsciously invoking the other two immortal “B’s,” of classical music, of which he was 2/3. 5’5” and broad-chested with kindly eyes. As a teenager, he tickled the ivories in rough inns to help support his family. Initially earned his living by teaching and anonymous playing for dances and the theater, then began giving concerts and meeting other well-known musicians. Introduced to composer Robert Schumann (Charley Mingus), who considered him a genius and helped promote his career. Assisted Clara Schumann (Jacqueline Du Pre) when her husband had a breakdown and had to be hospitalized. The two had an affectionate friendship, which continued after her husband’s madness and death in 1856. Never married, had several affairs, but Clara Schumann was probably the love of his life. Served as conductor and teacher to a German princess, then returned to Hamburg and conducted a women’s choral society, but failed to get the post of director of the Hamburg Philharmonic. Visited Vienna for the first time in 1862, and the following year served as conductor of its Singakedemie, before spending the next 5 years moving about Germany, giving concerts and tours. Returned to Vienna as a conductor, spent 3 years in Heidelberg, and then passed his last 19 years in Vienna, as his world reputation grew. Traveled to Italy almost every spring during this period, spending his summers in the country while limiting his conducting to his own works. Clara Schumann died the year before him, gravely affecting his health, particularly after missing her funeral. Finally succumbed to cancer of the liver, dying with two tears streaming down his cheeks. Wrote 4 symphonies, chamber music, a host of choral work and over 200 songs, operating in almost every genre save for opera. Inner: Extremely self-absorbed, with an equally reigned-in inability to express his emotions, save through his music. Ruthless self-censor, destroyed all his work, as well as correspondence that didn’t meet his high standards. Strong identification with the natural world, used environments for creative inspiration. Conservative romantic classicist and perfectionist. Many times in love, but whenever the “m” word would come up, always hastily withdrew. Lived simply, but in constant clutter. Repressed lifetime of bringing romantic classicism to its apex, while keeping his usual passions and anger largely in check, causing him to spin back in time the next time around to let his full creative fury rip forth. Antonio Vivaldi (c1675-1741) - Italian composer. Outer: Son of a violinist at St. Mark’s Church in Venice. The eldest of nine with four brothers and four sisters, he received his early training from his father, who was also a barber. By the time he was ordained as a priest in 1703, a vocation he was forced into because of economic circumstances, he was an accomplished musician, exhibiting a brilliance on the violin and an expertise on the organ and harpsichord. Suffered from asthma, and was weak and sickly, although he may have used ill health as a ploy to focus on his music rather than his clerical duties. Known as “the red priest,” because of his red hair and the red clerical garb he wore. Made violin teacher at the Ospedella della Pietà, a home for illegitimate or orphaned girls, with which he would remain associated for 37 years. Composed numerous operas, as well as oratorios and works for the violin. Traveled to both stage and conduct his works, then, in his early 30s, entered the service of the Landgraf of Hesse-Darmstadt, who was living in Italy. Became enamored of a young opera singer, Anna Giro, who would become the prima donna in all his future operas, as well as live with him, along with her sister. Returned to Venice 6 years later and was appointed director of the concerts at the Ospedale, with an orchestra and choir composed of young girls. Also took his father’s position, and became leading violinist at St. Mark’s. Composed in all forms, but is best remembered for the development of the violin concerto, writing over 230 of them. Composed at a furious pace, once writing an opera in 5 days. Wrote 38 in all, although was far more gifted as an instrumental, rather than a theatrical, composer. Continued his wide traveling, much to the consternation of the Ospedale authorities. Eventually the Church forbade his activities because of his questionable relationship with Giro and his peripatetic activities, although he did as he wished, and ultimately severed his connection with the Ospedale. His music, however, eventually fell out of favor, as did his tastes. By the end of his life, he was virtually a pauper, and died as such in Vienna, probably of asthmatic bronchitis, or possibly an attack of the heart. His works were characterized by a driving rhythm, as well as clarity and lyrical melody. Of his immense list of compositions, close to 800, only a fraction were published in his lifetime. After his death, his oeuvre was largely forgotten, but he regained his reputation in the 20th century. Inner: Fiery temperament, easily irritable. Mystical and down-to-Earth, as well as quite pious. Expressed his deep-seated spirituality through his music. Redheaded stranger lifetime of concentrating his composing and virtuoso genius largely on one instrument, the violin, while showing an imaginative and innovative brilliance in all his instrumental works, and a fiercely focused independence of character that ultimately became unintegrated with his times. Claudio Monteverdi (1567-1643) - Italian composer. Outer: Father was a doctor, mother was the daughter of a goldsmith, who died when her son was nine. Had two siblings by his original mother, and three half-siblings when his sire married again. Became a choirboy at a young age, and had a famous composer and organ virtuoso, Marc’Antonio Ingeneri, as his teacher. At 16, he published his first work, and was already a skilled organist and viol player. Entered the service of the Duke of Mantua as a musician, and enjoyed ready acceptance as a singer of madrigals. In his early 30s, he married Claudia Cattaneo, a gifted harpist and singer, who was the daughter of a musician, and the union produced two sons and a daughter. Ultimately made Master of Music for his patron. At the age of 40, his wife became seriously ill and died later that year, plummeting him into a state of violent grief, although he continued composing as a means of dealing with it. After his patron passed on, he had a falling out with his heir and left the court of Mantua to take a similar position with the Republic of Venice, at St. Mark’s Church, a position he held until his death. From his mid-40s, he lived in seclusion, depression and simplicity, devoted entirely to his music. Revolutionized the use of the orchestra, making it purely instrumental, where before it had been smaller and secondary to chorals. Wrote madrigals, masses, motets, chansons, operas and for the theater, and had a continent-wide reputation, while influencing many of the major baroque composers of his time. In his 60s, Mantua was sacked while the plague scourged Venice, and he took holy orders as an inducement to escape the ravages of the latter. Just before he died, he asked for a leave to return to his original home, but couldn’t make the journey and came back to Venice, where he died following a short illness. Inner: Honest, forthright and mournful. Highly emotional but able to channel that energy into his music, using love and loss as a motivating factor. Sad-eyed lifetime of mastering all the forms available to him in his day, while learning how to transmute his deep-seated melancholy and spirituality into profound and transcendent lyrical noise. Francesco Landini (c1325-1397) - Italian composer, organist, singer, instrument maker and poet. Outer: Father was an artist, Jacobo del Casentino. Suffered blindness as a child as a result of smallpox, but, despite his handicap, he became a scholar in the liberal arts and an esteemed poet, as well as a master of the theory and practice of music. A recognized virtuoso on several instruments, most notably the organetto, a small portable organ, while legend had it, the birds would stop singing to hear him play. Served several princely families, while the greater part of his life was spent in Florence. Wrote ballates, which were songs to accompany dances, and proved himself the leading Italian composer of that form in his time. Worked entirely in the secular mode, with madrigals, ballads, canzonas and songs. Inner: Sightless lifetime of allowing his senses to be thoroughly defined by sound, in order to completely immerse himself in music, a discipline that he would absolutely master in the centuries to come, as one of the most brilliantly volatile talents who ever transmuted his thundering interior into majestic rhythm and melody.

*

PATHWAY OF THE MUSICIAN AS CONSISTENTLY BRILLIANT PRODIGY:
Storyline: The boy wonder ultimately sees himself and his infectious spirit to full psychological and musical maturity through his own ongoing evolution as an eternal adolescent finally ready to completely grow up.

Stevie Wonder (Steveland Morris) (1950) - American singer and songwriter. Outer: Of African/American descent. A premature baby, he became blind from too much oxygen in his incubator, as well as a dislocated nerve in one eye, and a cataract in the other. His father was abusive and his parents separated when he was young. Grew up in Detroit with his mother, who remarried a baker. The third of six children with four brothers and a sister. Had a normal childhood, with an extraordinary sense of sound substituting for his lack of sight. His mother rarely let him out of the house alone, so that the radio was his constant companion. Taught himself to play drums and harmonica at 5, and took piano lessons soon afterwards. Started hanging around the recording studios of Motown, where people began calling him the little boy wonder, and eventually Little Stevie Wonder. Had his first big hit at 12, with “Fingertips, Part 2,” and became a recording artist for Motown, which carefully controlled his career. Toured, then took a break as his voice changed and studied classical piano at Michigan Institute for the Blind. Appeared in a couple of frothy films, while pouring forth enough hits to establish his own publishing company, Black Bull Music, and build his own recording studio. Married singer/songwriter Syreeta Wright in 1970, and collaborated with her. The duo divorced 2 years later, but remained close friends until her death from cancer in 2004. Because of the restrictions placed on his artistic goals, he left Motown at 21, and began experimenting with synthesizers and playing most of the instrumental accompaniments on his works. “Little Stevie” became Stevie as he grew to 6 feet. Later returned to Motown as a full-fledged artist, when he was given complete control over his oeuvre, including ownership of the rights to everything he created. Studied musical theory at USC, and, at 23, he was in an auto accident when a log fell off a lumber truck he was trying to pass. Lay in a coma for a week, after which he lost his sense of smell. Became more politically involved as he grew older, working for Martin Luther King’s birthday to become a national holiday, as well as other causes, while his albums, including “Innervisions,” reflected his racial and social concerns. Reached a peak in 1976 with his 13th album, the two-part LP, “Songs in the Key of Life,” after which, his recording output tailed off. A familiar public figure with his corn-rowed hair, swaying singing style and upbeat persona, while remaining continually popular throughout his career as an icon of joyous, uplifting sound, appearing in concert and on TV, in addition to his prolific recording output. Inducted into the Songwriter’s Hall of Fame in 1983, the Rock’n’Roll Hall of Fame in 1989, and was given a Grammy Lifetime Achievement award in 1996, to go along with his record 22 Grammys. In the late 1990s, he underwent an experimental operation to partially restore the outer edges of his sight. In 2001, he married fashion designer Kai Milla Morris, a daughter and son from the union, while at the same time, he was hit with a palimony suit by his former wardrobe assistant, Angela McAfee, who he countersued and their contretemps was settled out of court. Spent a decade between releases, before coming out with “A Time to Love,” in 2005. In 2009, he became the 2nd recipient of the Library of Congress Gershwin Prize for Popular Song, in a White House ceremony celebrating his longtime contributions to music. Filed for divorce in 2012 after separating from KMM in 2009, while seeking custody of their two children. Became affianced to Tomeeka Robyn Bracy afterwards, who was nearly a quarter century his junior. The duo secretly had a daughter together, while expecting triplets, which turned out to be a second daughter to bring his total progeny up to 9. Given an all-star Grammy salute in 2015, in recognition of his long, remarkable career. Has a net worth of $110 million. Inner: Highly spiritual, with an infectious sense of joy about himself and his music. Possesses an acute sense of hearing to such a fine-tuned degree that he can pinpoint the position of people in a room through sound and pick up reverberations off of walls by approaching them. Doesn’t use a cane or seeing-eye dog, preferring human aides. Wonder-filled lifetime of continuing to explore the pure elements of sound without its visual accompaniment, through an increasingly more integrated character, and a focus on the gospel and rhythm & blues tradition of his upbringing. Franz Schubert (1797-1828) - German composer. Outer: German composer. Outer: From peasant stock. 12th child of a school teacher, who was also an amateur cellist. Mother was a cook, and 7 years her husband’s senior. Only four other siblings, three older brothers and a younger sister, out of a total of fourteen, survived infancy, while the family struggled financially, but through spartan discipline, met its ends. Initially taught by his father, a man of considerable integrity, then by an older brother, followed by a local kapellmeister, before being accepted at the Imperial Konvikt, a former Jesuit school, at the age of 11. On the board of approval was Antonio Salieri (Gian Malipiero), a rival of his previous existence as Wolfgang Mozart, who had been falsely accused of poisoning him. Had a much better relationship with him the second time around, although learned little from the school’s careless curriculum, benefiting rather from his fellow students, who gave him the encouragement he needed. Idolized Mozart, but felt Ludwig van Beethoven (Van Morrison) was his true divinity. Began composing in his teens, despite his father’s wishes he become a schoolmaster, and have music as a hobby. His mother died from typhus when he was 15, and he left school the following year. His sire remarried and he became an assistant teacher at his father’s school to avoid the Austrian army, using the unengaging work to compose prodigiously in his free time. Left his father’s school 2 years later, and 2 years after that, became music master to the princely Esterhazy family in Hungary. Lived most of his life in poverty, and was little recognized outside his immediate circle, but well-loved within it. Moved continually, but was always composing, even sleeping with his spectacles on, in case he were struck by a song. A homophile, although he once contemplated marriage. Visited Beethoven before his death, and on the anniversary of it a year later gave his own concert in Vienna. An unobtrusive performer, but uncompromising in his extraordinary musical intelligence. Took to his bed the following year and died of typhus. Wrote operas, his least skillful mode of expression, operettas, chamber music, and for voices and specific instruments, in an outpouring that may have been inspired by an inner sense that this would be another brief, but blindingly brilliant go-round, with his final decade his most brilliant, like his Mozart go-round. Best known for his Ave Maria and Unfinished Symphony. Wrote over 600 songs, many to the lyrics of the famous poets of his day, and they would establish him as the greatest ever to tackle that genre. His manuscripts kept appearing decades after his death, emerging from its various hiding places, almost as if he lived the full term of his years, and produced accordingly. Inner: Gentle, warm, introspective and shy, with none of the egotistic baggage often associated with genius. Wrote quickly, in a spontaneous mode, so that his shorter pieces far outweighed his longer works. Deliberately underappreciated and metaphorically unfinished lifetime of avoiding the distractions of fame and fortune to concentrate on producing an extraordinarily melodious oeuvre, before dying the true romantic early death of a largely unrecognized genius. Wolfgang Mozart (Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart) (1756-1791) - German composer. Outer: Son of Leopold Mozart (Leopold Stokowski), a violinist who was court composer and Kappelmeister for the archbishop of Salzburg’s orchestra. Mother had been raised by a widow on a charity pension. When his father saw the prodigious talent of his prodigy son, he decided to abandon his own career to guide and exploit the young genius in his familial charge. His older sister, Nannerl (Fiona Apple) was also a prodigy on the clavier. Started composing when he was 5, after hearing his father’s music lessons to his sibling. His progenitor began to tour with the astonishing children, taking them to the capitals of Europe where they played before royalty, who oohed and aahed over them, lavishing them with praise and presents. Briefly flirted with death with smallpox, and went blind for nine days from the disease, before recovering. Continued to both study and compose, while allowing himself to be docilely trotted out and put on display, at the behest of his exploitative father. By the age of 13 he had already written concertos, sonatas, symphonies, an opera and an operetta, while showing a scatological wit in his letters home. At 16, he was appointed concert master to the newly elected Archbishop of Salzburg, a man of no artistic taste whatsoever, unlike his predecessor. Held that position for six years, before returning to his touring mode with his mother, much to the former’s contumely. 5’4”. Unable to get a court appointment, he returned to Salzburg and, in his mid-20s, married Constanze Weber, the sister of a singer with whom he had earlier fallen in love, and the daughter of a former landlady. Only 2 of 6 children from the union survived infancy, causing much heartache. Lost his beloved mother in 1778 and eventually became estranged from his domineering father, whose manipulations had succeeded in retarding his son’s psychological growth. Had difficulties with finances and was forced to teach and give public concerts. Financial ineptitude would plague him the rest of his life because of his and his wife’s ongoing extravagance, forcing him to constantly borrow and remain in debt. Met Joseph Haydn (G.W. Pabst) and had a warm friendship with him, as well as an unintentional rivalry with Antonio Saleri (Gian Malipiero), who unfounded rumor had it, was accused of eventually poisoning him. His operas were sporadically received by a public who enjoyed his lighter works. Became a chamber musician and court composer to HRE Joseph II (Michael Moore), an amateur musician himself, but failed to be reappointed by his successor. Even after his father’s death in 1787, the shadow of the old man hung over him, causing intermittent depressions and despair from never having received his blessing as a grown-up in his own right. His last work was a requiem, which he knew presaged his own death. Suffering from what he felt was poisoning, he worked at it feverishly, before finally succumbing to partial paralysis and dying at the age of 36, either from prescriptive antimony poisoning, as the romantics would have it, or from rheumatic fever and heart failure. His last gesture was an attempt at mouthing the drum passage from his requiem. Buried the next day in a pauper’s grave in a pouring rainstorm, which caused his bearers to abandon him, leaving him completely alone at the end. Evinced a brilliant gaiety to his works, which ranged from opera to church music to orchestral to chamber to concerto to instrumental, and have never gone out of fashion. His best remembered operas include The Marriage of Figaro, Don Giovanni and The Magic Flute all composed during his last five years. Inner: Flighty, immature, vulgar, vain, a natural genius, and an arrested adolescent in an artificial age. Also quite brilliant, spoke 5 or 6 languages, and had a huge library. Party animal, loved to socialize. Unaware of any other cultural phenomenon than music. Often looked stupid, masking an otherwise extraordinary musical intelligence. Probably able to hear all the music of the spheres, one of the few perfect masters ever on the planet in any one particular field during a specific time. Had the ability to pen large scores in nearly finished form, as evidence of his pure musical channeling abilities. Permanent adolescent lifetime of being put on full display from an early age on in order to see how his genius would function under a constant spotlight, and how his output would respond to an arrested sense of social development, thanks to a withholding father who taxed his limited psychological resource to the extreme. Georges Bizet (Alexander Cesar Leopold Bizet) (1838-1875) - French composer. Outer: Son of a singing teacher, mother was also a professional musician. Received his first lessons from his parents, and was a prodigy, which allowed him admittance to the Paris Conservatoire. Always youthful looking, even into middle-age, carrying his sense of the adolescent with him. A gifted pianist, who was already composing instrumental music in his teens. His Symphony in C Major, was very reminiscent of Franz Schubert, a later incarnation of his lived at an earlier time. Studied with Jacques Halevy (Darius Milhaud), whose daughter, Genevieve, he married in his early 30s. After her husband’s early death she married a lawyer, held a celebrated salon, and was immortalized in the pages of Marcel Proust (Harold Brodkey). Suffered poor health most of his short life. Took several prizes, including the coveted Grand Prix de Rome in 1857. Spent 3 years in Rome, suffering the first of many frustrations there that would mark the latter part of his life, before returning to Paris to begin his career as an operatic composer. Lived with his family through the death of his mother the following year, and had a son by the family servant, who later attended him on his deathbed. Liked writing on exotic subjects, with a Mozartian sense of characterization. His first works were either moderate successes or he destroyed the score. Best known for Carmen, a tragic tale of love, which mirrored his own sense of unhappy fatalism, and was not well-received when first produced. Suffered from throat cancer, and died of a heart attack at his country villa near Paris the day Carmen was given its 23rd performance. His funeral service was attended by 4000 people. Inner: Simple, intelligent, well-read, straightforward, slight, energetic and good natured. Prone, however, to lifelong emotional outbursts, which were always followed by illness. Focused lifetime of largely concentrating on one form, while expanding his sense of melody and orchestration but failing to transcend his ongoing adolescence, in a body that was not destined to live long, as symbol of his ongoing struggles with achieving full and accomplished maturity. Giovanni Pergolesi (Giovanni Draghi) (1710-1736) - Italian composer. Outer: Father was a surveyor, and the family name was changed to reflect their place of origin. Studied at the Conservatorio dei Poveri di Gesu Cristo in Naples, then taught for 3 years in Loreto. After writing a church music drama, he earned the patronage of the Prince of Stigliano and wrote operas and intermezzos, although his sporadic successes and notable failures turned him away from the theater and back to church music. Because of disappointments, as well as a dissipated lifestyle, his health failed and he died of tuberculosis at the age of 26, and he was buried in a pauper’s pit. Came into vogue after his death, although his work was not consistent, often getting by on sentiment and charm, having not yet achieved the full gifts of his later lives in this series, and still stuck in the awkward emotional development that would curtail any sense of maturity to his body of work. Inner: Intermittently touched by great talent, although too short a life to give it full breath, and too undeveloped on the interior to fully explore his musical sensibilities. Slice of pizza lifetime of giving indication of the vast talent to come, while falling victim to his own previously contained appetite for sensual excess. Antonio de Cabezon (1500-1566) - Spanish composer. Outer: From a noble family of landholders, blind since early childhood. One brother, Juan de Cabezon, also became an organist and composer. Studied with a series of organists, before moving to Toledo and in 1525, he took up a position in the royal chapel of Spanish queen Isabella, holding it until her death in 1539. Ultimately served her son, Felipe II (Adolph Hitler), in a similar capacity. Was one of the earliest of the keyboard composers, showing a remarkably advanced technique in his expression, as well as a brilliant sense of musical language. Wrote mostly church music, and lived a life that was circumscribed by his court duties. In his late 30s, he married Luisa Nuñez de Mocos, the daughter of a wealthy family, and made his wife’s native city, Avila, his base. 5 children from the union, including 2 sons who were musicians, one of whom succeeded him in his court position. Fully recognized for his achievements, he was a great favorite of Felipe’s, accompanying him on his travels, and eventually moving to Madrid. During his sojourns, which included Germany, the low countries and England, he was exposed to a considerable amount of music, although wrote primarily in the Spanish instrumental mode of his time. Only a few of his pieces were printed during his lifetime, with his son Hernando publishing the majority of his work afterwards. Inner: Circumscribed lifetime of sacrificing his eyes for the power of his ears, while imprinting himself on the ongoing evolution of western music, as one of its transcendental masters in the ages to come.

*

PATHWAY OF THE MUSICIAN AS SORCERER OF THE STRINGS:
Storyline: The windmilling wizard electrifies his audiences whatever century he chooses to plug into, while living fast and dying young if the circumstances dictate, or living fast and dying old with the same incandescence and desire for transcendental musical experience on all levels.

Jimi Hendrix (James Marshall Hendrix) (1942-1970) - American musician. Outer: Of African/American, as well as Mexican and Cherokee descent. Father was a Seattle gardener, who had 12 fingers and was an amateur musician. Mother was only 16, and was continually leaving her alcoholic abusive husband, who habitually beat his son. Oldest of 6 children born to them, although they signed away their parental rights to 4 of them. Dumped on a neighbor when he was 5 days old, and had an impoverished, insecure upbringing, often disappearing into his own imagination. Social workers were continually trying to take him from his home, while he exhibited a painful shyness throughout his upbringing. As a capper to his thoroughly disjointed childhood, his mother died of cirrhosis of the liver when he was a teenager. A self-taught musician, he played guitar to records, with an affinity for rhythm and blues, before strumming in high school bands. Left-handed, he originally played the guitar upside down. Dropped out of high school, was arrested in a stolen car, and enlisted as a paratrooper with the 101st Airborne Division to avoid jail, but injured his back and broke an ankle on a jump, and got a medical discharge from the army 2 years later. Later, it was revealed he had pretended to be a homophile to avoid Vietnam service, and the initial story was just a coverup. Began his musical career as a sideman, then toured under the name of Jimmie James with various name rhythm and blues groups. Played the club circuit in NYC, forming his own band, Jimmy James and the Blue Flames, while living on the streets, then moved to England in 1966 and formed the Jimi Hendrix Experience with two British musicians. Debuted in Paris and the trio was an immediate sensation, subsequently breaking attendance records all over Europe, thanks to his flamboyant playing, including with his teeth. Although famous in England, he was still an unknown in America, when he returned in 1967. Joined a tour of the Monkees, a highly commercialized band put together for a TV show, but his innate eroticism, suggestive lyrics and guitar-smashing was far beyond the ken of Monkee fans, and he was politely asked to leave thetour. Seared himself into popular consciousness at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967, particularly after dousing his guitar with lighter fluid and burning it to screaming ovations. Became the first performer to harness electronic feedback and make it part of the r’n’r musical vocabulary. His legendary playing of the “Star Spangled Banner” to close the Woodstock Festival 2 years later, cemented his status as entertainer extraordinaire. A glorious performer, he drove his audiences into ecstatic states, with his virtuoso and highly influential guitar work, but he also felt trapped by fame, and his audiences’ demands for his familiar repertoire, as his concerts became more violent, with his fans demanding he go to the edge for them, which resonated far more with his destructive antics than his enormous creativity. Began taking uppers and downers and shooting LSD to meet their mandates, while his manager misappropriated his moneys, causing tax problems in Britain. Subject to panic attacks, while surrounded by druggies who manipulated him, he finally disbanded his original group, and constructed his own studio in NY, Electric Lady. Jammed with the best and the brightest of his generation, but trouble with drugs, including being arrested in Toronto for heroin possession, caused him to reassess his musical direction. After criticism of only playing with white musicians, he formed Band of Gypsies with Buddy Miles, but continued to be hugely disappointed with his audience, and its inability to support his ongoing development as a musician. His last show in Germany was marred by uberviolence and fighting near the stage. While in England, he choked on his own vomit, drowning in his own gastric fluid while sleeping, after imbibing German barbiturates, although probably could have been saved. Some mystery remains around his death, with suspicion he may have been murdered, by orders of his manager who he was about to drop. Buried in a flannel logger’s shirt, as one final irony to his life. Following his death, virtually everything he ever did on tape was marketed and released, exploiting his brilliant musical light, which skyrocketed and flamed out far too soon. In 1992, he was given a posthumous Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, and the same year he was inducted into the Rock’n’Roll Hall of Fame. Inner: Sweet and pure, with the ability both to rouse audiences and turn any sound he created into sheer musical drama. Highly critical of conventional society, felt “the world’s a bring-down, maybe if we play loud enough, we can drown it out.” Propensity for heroin indicated a strong death-wish, and throat exit was a statement of blocked communication with the world-at-large. Wanted to get married to assuage his loneliness, and couldn’t say ‘no’ to anyone. His family was his guitar, most of his other relationships were highly superficial. Largely apolitical, while claiming to be a strong anti-communist. Saw fame as “a roomful of mirrors.” Kiss-the-sky lifetime of setting new musical standards in a popular, highly accessible medium, while influencing a host of musicians with his theatrics and sheer luminosity, before blazing out at the height of his powers. Charley Christian (1919-1942) - American guitarist. Outer: Of African/American descent. Father was a blind itinerant guitarist and singer. All 4 of his brothers were musicians, 2 working professionally. Began playing trumpet and guitar as a youngster, and later added bass and piano. Made his own crude guitar in a shop class, and had the good fortune of an inspirational music teacher in high school, Zelia Breaux. Played in a family band from his early teens, then in one of his brothers’ groups, while also working as a tap-dancer, singer, baseball pitcher and prizefighter. Toured with several bands, leading one of them, and was discovered by several big name jazz musicians, which led to his inclusion in the Benny Goodman sextet, first in Los Angeles, then in New York. Goodman initially was opposed to him because of his amplifiers, but was won over the first time he heard him play. One of the first to realize the potential of amplified guitar, making it a solo instrument in the context of a larger ensemble. Pre-bebopper, but with a clear, high line to his playing, which was endlessly imaginative. Recorded with a number of groups, but was diagnosed with tuberculosis. Partied heartily until the end, while wasting away, and died at the age of 21 in a sanitarium. Inner: Alcoholic, promiscuous, rarely slept, knowing his life would be short and sweet. Liked flashy clothes, and from certain angles bore an astonishing resemblance to his next incarnation. One string lifetime of making his presence felt on a newly amplified instrument before exiting early without regret to give his discovery far more play to a far larger audience the next time around. Niccolo Paganini (1782-1840) - Italian violinist. Outer: Father was an unsuccessful trader in the shipping business. Third of six children. Taught by his ambitious sire, an amateur musician, who stood over him with a rod of iron, disciplining him heavily for mistakes, much to his physical detriment, although he submitted because of his own overweening ambitions. Studied under 2 other teachers and made his debut at 9. Continued his apprenticeship and made his first tour at 13. Finally rebelled against discipline at home and left, successfully touring Italy, while following a dissolute, philandering life, with gambling as his most enjoyable diversion. Occasionally pawned his violin to meet his debts, while his health always remained precarious. Tall, lean, cadaverous, striking-looking, with lips curled into a continuous sardonic smile, as if he were the devil incarnate. May have suffered from Marfan syndrome, a genetic disorder which exaggerates the length of both limbs and fingers/ His hair fell in long ringlets to his shoulders, while he dressed in black for the stage. Had a love affair with a titled Tuscan lady, where rumor had it, he was imprisoned for 3 years at her chateau. Took up the guitar, but returned to the violin and continued his studying, composing and playing, with his compositions geared towards his own concerts. Returned to the concert stage with spectacular success, and in 1805, he became the musical director at the court of Napoleon’s sister, Maria-Elisa (Jessica Mitford), the Princess of Lucca, a position he held for 8 years. A rampant satyr, thanks to his unquestionable thirst for excess, which often got him in trouble. Had a son in 1825 by a singer, Antonia Bianchi, although the duo later went their separate ways. His son, however, proved a loyal companion, after earlier being taken on his European tours. From time to time, he had problems with his voice, but he would recover and go on tour, where he was always greeted with wild adulation. Made concert appearances in England, Ireland and Scotland, as well as Italy and Austria and Germany, never failing to electrify the house with his incandescent presence. After buying a home in Italy in 1834, he toured less, and his health began rapidly deteriorating, particularly after a gambling house in which he had invested in Paris, collapsed. At the end, his voice went and he could barely speak above a whisper. Died from cancer of the larynx during a cholera epidemic. His body was shipped home, but wasn’t allowed ashore because of fears of contagion, and he had to be stowed away for five years on a reef-island, before being exhumed and finally receiving a full and public burial in Genoa. Generally regarded as the greatest violin virtuoso of all time. Inner: Fiery temperament, born showman, who lived to perform. Considered avaricious, but also very generous. Often sacrificed music for pure performance, and zealously guarded his technical secrets. Satyr but wiser lifetime of brilliant exhibitionism in the name of culture, fame and fortune, insuring a transcendental reputation, despite his compromised musical abilities, before exiting once again via the throat, underlying his ongoing vulnerabilities in that area. Guiseppe Tartini (1692-1770) - Italian composer and violinist. Outer: From a good Florentine family. Father was a prosperous businessman, landowner and philanthropist, who planned a theological career for his son. Educated by a priest, then was sent to school at Capo d’Istria, before studying law at the Univ. of Padua. Had to leave the city because he married a pupil there, which outraged both his family and hers. Largely self-taught, he spent 3 years as an orchestral violinist in the provinces, finding a haven at the Franciscan monastery at Assisi. Made first violinist for the orchestra in Padua, then conducted and played in Prague, where his amorous adventures landed him a paternity suit. Played in Vienna as well, before returning to his home base, disgusted with both foreign climates and foreign food, never to travel again. In his mid-30s, he established a school of violin playing in Padua that became famous throughout Europe, proving to be a dedicated teacher with a strong paternal interest in his students. Inaugurated the use of thicker strings and a bow of lighter wood, a revised bowing technique and was the first to secure just intonation. Also attempted to introduce religion and philosophy into musical theory without any success. His most famous piece was The Devil’s Trill, supposedly played by the devil to him in a dream. An arm injury curtailed his later virtuoso career. Retired and was pensioned 5 years before his death. Composed some 135 violin concertos, showing an equal mastery in the realm of composition. Considered the greatest violin master of his time, a champion of tone, taste and technique. Inner: Sweet-natured, gentle, lovable, pious, well-bred, unpretentious. Teacherly lifetime of bringing both his practice and theory to his stringed instrument of choice to set the standard for violin-playing for his day, before focusing on the sheer theatricality of performance in his later go-rounds in this series, while struggling with his unusual sense of communication.

*

PATHWAY OF THE MUSICIAN AS FREAK OF NATURE:
Storyline: The outlandish oddity finally claims his unusual persona as a worthy vehicle for the self-expressive monster talent that resides within it, after many a go-round of rejecting saidsame as not being worthy of the various conflicted characters laying claim to his ongoing legacy of self-destructive creativity and creative self-destruction.

David Bowie (David Robert Jones) (1947-2016) - British singer, actor, producer, artist and songwriter. Outer: Of British and Irish descent: Father was a Protestant show business entrepreneur who became a publicist. Mother was of Irish Catholic extract and a waitress, model and nanny. Had one older half-brother from his mother’s first marriage, who suffered from schizophrenia for years, before killing himself in 1985, which made him fear his own potential madness. Also had a stepsister from his father’s side, who disappeared from his life. Grew up in a rough section of south London, but eventually moved to the suburbs. Suffered a permanently dilated left pupil from being punched in the eye as a teenager by a friend, which fed into his alien appearance. 5’10”, thin, with handsome, sensitive features. Left a technical high school in 1963 to work as a commercial artist in an advertising agency, and began playing with bands under his own name, then changed it to a “cutting-edge” American moniker, to avoid confusion with Davy Jones of the Monkees. Spent some weeks in a Buddhist monastery in Scotland, but decided against taking vows, then took mime lessons, and started his own troupe, Feathers, in 1968. His first hit single was “Space Oddity,” the following year. Married Angela Barnett, an American, in 1970, one son, Zowie (later changed to Joe) Bowie. The duo divorced a decade later. Became a superstar with his self-proclaimed “leper messiah,” Ziggy Stardust, taking on alien personalities and odd dress, while continuously experimenting with a host of musical styles, and using the unique instrument of his voice in highly effective impersonal manner. Publicly announced his bisexuality in 1972, after a celebrated affair with singer Mick Jagger, while also pursuing a host of celebrities, including Elizabeth Taylor, Susan Sarandon and Tina Turner, in a carnal explosion of lust, testing his desirability. Continued his on-again, off-again turmoil around performing, while revising his look and his sound, adding and subtracting to and from his ongoing musical persona. In 1976, he played the title role in The Man Who Fell to Earth, about an alien in search of water. Became the Thin White Duke, and his career soared, but he suffered a paranoid identity crisis with the overuse of drugs and the Los Angeles party scene. Eventually moved to West Berlin for 3 years, where he cleaned out and stabilized himself in semi-seclusion, despite suffering profound depression. After earlier having been fleeced by managers, he formed his own management company, Isolar Enterprises in the 1980s, which helped him gain far greater control over his output. Continued his film work, as well as TV, and an appearance on Broadway, while pursuing his recording career. Also an amateur painter. In 1992, he married African model, Iman, one daughter from the union. Both drawn to and repelled by his fame, as a postmodern walking contradiction. After blandifying his appeal in the 1980s, he returned to his more innovative roots in the 1990s, with a great desire to celebrate the coming of the millennium in appropriately imaginative fashion. His increasing paranoia about possible assassination a la John Lennon (Jessie J), particularly during a show, curtailed his performing career. Inducted into the Rock’n’Roll Hall of Fame in 1996. One of the world’s richest rock stars, with a fortune estimated near $1 billion, thanks to his innovative acumen around money, which saw him selling Bowie Bonds and plugging into various commercial electronic outlets. Underwent emergency heart surgery in 2004, after a minor attack, from heavy smoking and incessant touring, and may ultimately have suffered a half dozen heart seizures. In 2006, he was given a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, then was given a multimedia retrospective of his career called “David Bowie Is” at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago in 2014 in celebration of his unique status as a pop culture phenomenon. The following annum he announced he would never tour again, although remained active writing and composing, In the latter capacity, he co-wrote the musical “Lazarus” which was based on The Man Who Fell to Earth and made its off-Broadway debut in 2015. Critics found it uberweird but intriguing, since most of the songs were unintegrated into the script, making the show totally dependent on bits and pieces rather than its whole. Released “Blackstar,” his 25th studio album, the following year just prior to his demise, once again confounding categories with a simple sound culled from a crew of top jazz musicians, behind a melancholic and dark lyric base. During his last 18 months, he battled liver cancer, and ultimately succumbed to it at his NYC home four days after his 69th birthday, surrounded by family. His final video released days before his death, showed him lying on a hospital bed, singing “Look up here, I’m in heaven.” Secretly cremated afterwards per his wish not to have public funeral or memorial, while his last album was his first ever to become a number one Billboard release. Won 5 posthumous Grammys in 2017, after receiving only one during his life. Inner: Highly intelligent, engagingly articulate, and a strikingly original physical presence. Unconsciously schizophrenic with the creation of stage characters that he tried to integrate into his life, later more settled in both his look and his outlook. Healing lifetime of trying to find happiness within himself around his enormous talent to elucidate and entertain, a continuous theme of his, which his deliberately divided character may have finally overcome through the slow integration of his various contradictions. Egon Schiele (1890-1918) - Austrian artist. Outer: Father was a stationmaster, mother had married him against her parents’ wishes. His family lived over a railroad station, and he became fascinated with trains, a longtime family occupation. His sire had syphilis, and passed it on to wife and children. Held a great love for the former, but viewed his mother as a dead soul. Began drawing at the age of 18 months, although his mother thought it was a waste of time. Several siblings died young, close with a sister who used to pose nude for him. When he was 14, his sire died of untreated syphilis. Flunked out of school, and an uncle tried to force him into the military, but he fought to become an artist. Studied at the Vienna Academy of Fine Arts, and his erotic, highly expressive work gained notoriety, as he exhibited all over Europe. Handsome but gaunt. Did numerous studies of himself masturbating. Openly lived with a mistress, and was forced out of one small town and charged with immorality when he and his lover gave refuge to a 13 year old runaway. Arrested for seducing her, although the charge was unproven in the subsequent trial, but he was sentenced for allowing children access to immoral drawings in his studio. Spent 24 days in jail, which traumatized him, while one of his drawings was publicly burned in court. His representations all made his subjects look cadaverous, as reflections of himself. Did many self-portraits, as well as landscapes, with women masturbating and making love to one another as his favorite motif. Married Edith Harms on his parent’s wedding anniversary, but 3 days after the death of his pregnant wife, he died of the Spanish influenza during the epidemic of 1918. His main subject was the human form, in exaggeratedly ascetic or erotic poses. Inner: Shy, introspective, but obsessive in the pursuit of his art. Never passed a mirror without examining himself. A dandy, with a taste for well-made American shoes. Fascinated with sickness, sex and death, while the most intimate and important relationship in his life was with himself. Saw women as archetypes rather than people. Confessional and compassionate in his work. Intense, earnest, extremely alienated and self-destructive. Tunnel-vision lifetime of searching for salvation by shocking pedestrian sensibilities, while embracing death as the ultimate artistic statement of self-search. Petr Ilich Tchaikovsky (1840-1893) - Russian composer. Outer: Of Ukrainian descent on his paternal side, and French and German on his maternal. Father was an inspector and manager of mines, who had absolutely no interest in music. Mother was the second of her husband’s three wives, and unhappy in the marriage, although she doted on her favorite son. 2nd of 5 sons and a daughter, along with an older half-sister. Close with his younger sister, and his younger twin brothers. Evinced his dualities early, showing an intense, hyperemotional heart and a modest, magnanimous mind. Along with his siblings, he was given a solid education by a young French governess. Began piano lessons at 5, showing himself to be an adept on the instrument, although his sire had already decided on a civil service career for him. When he was 14, his mother died of cholera, and he mourned her deeply the rest of his life. Reluctantly studied law, and became a petty clerk in the Ministry of Justice. Rebelled in his early 20s, and against family wishes, studied music at the St. Petersburg Conservatory, while frequenting Italian operas. An indefatigable worker, and an excellent improviser with a lifelong love for the music of Wolfgang Mozart (Stevie Wonder). In 1865, he moved permanently to Moscow and accepted a teaching position at a new conservatory established by the brother of his music teacher, Anton Rubinstein (Dmitri Shostakovich). His first decade in Moscow was one of great struggle and rejection, coupled with attacks of nervous depression and a morbid sense of self-disgust. Composed several hastily-writ operas, while his orchestral works showed his true genius. A bi-sexual, he was engaged to an opera star who wed another, and in his late 30s, married one of his former students, Antonina Miliukova, then immediately saw their incompatibility. Suffered a nervous collapse and was unconscious for 2 days after leaving her, before recovering near Lake Geneva, while seeing he was incapable of loving women as he did his male friends. Engaged in a written correspondence with Nadezhda von Meck, the wealthy widow of a railway engineer, who gave him an income as well as an ear, without putting any demands on his delicate temperament, by stipulating they never meet and limit their exchange to letters, which was perfect for his peculiar temperament. Was able to give up teaching in 1878 and concentrate fully on composing, while enjoying the relative peace of Clarens, Switzerland as one of his bases. Able to pour his considerable emotional intelligence into his work, which was deeply appreciated by his Russian audiences. Became world famous, and was able to overcome his shyness and take up conducting, making an international tour in 1888. After more than 1000 letters, his patroness broke with him over own health and financial issues, which devastated him, leaving him hurt and bitter over her loss to his life. Visited America in 1891, and conducted one of his works on the opening of Carnegie Hall in NYC. Ended his life inadvertently by drinking a glass of unfiltered water and died of cholera, although rumors abounded he had committed suicide, when former homophobic classmates shamed him into his own death. Wrote operas, orchestral works, concertos, chamber and piano music, but is best known for his ballets, Swan Lake and The Nutcracker. Inner: Intensely emotional, headstrong and impetuous, but also modest and candid, yet another walking contradiction. Romantic rather than nationalistic like other Russian composers of the time. Suffered from insomnia and delicate nerves, morbidly shy, easily hurt, but able to accept constructive criticism. Wrote impulsively, creating an unevenness to his work that sprang more from his heart than his musical mind. Unintegrated lifetime of suffering mightily for his art, preferring the impersonality of creativity to the demands of interrelationships, while focusing, as always, upon the many selves that continually make up his hard-to-see center. Jozef Boruwlaski (1739-1837) - Polish/English musician and composer. Outer: Father was a landowner who died when his son was 9, leaving the family in financial straits. Both parents were normal-sized, while his mother was of limited noble blood. Had four brothers and a sister. Third of six children, with one six footer, and two others, the oldest and youngest, like himself dwarves. Because of family struggles, adopted by and educated by a friend of his mother’s, the Staorina de Caorlix. Stood two feet tall at the time. She, in turn, married and passed him on so that he became the protégé of an even wealthier woman, the Comtesse de Humiecka, who took over the raising of him in his mid-teens. Became her traveling companion, as she dubbed him “Jou-Jo” or plaything. Lived in Vienna for six months, where he charmed the Empress Maria Theresa (Margaret Thatcher). Taught to dance by the ballet master of Vienna, and was given violin lessons in Paris. Ultimately grew to three feet three inches by the age of 30. After his considerable travels, he returned to Warsaw at the age of 40, and fell in love with Isalina Borboutin, who was of normal height and French descent, and had been taken into the house of the Comtesse. Their furious hostess tried to end the romance, although the two continued to secretly exchange letters, and ultimately the affair terminated the patronage of the former. Married Isalina, and fathered a daughter, who had to be given up because of financial considerations, and he became an entertainer to support himself and his wife. Proved quite successful and was ultimately taken under the protective wing of the Polish king, who may or may not have made him a count, a title which he used anyway. Continued touring and traveling all over Europe. while achieving considerable fame, playing for both royalty and nobility, while ultimately separating from his wife, whom he felt humiliated him and treated him as if he were a child. Came to Great Britain in 1782, and toured Ireland and Scotland, before deciding to settle in Durham, a small city in northeastern England, where he penned his memoirs and published them in 1788. Retired there three years later, and formed a friendship with Stephen Kemble, an enormous actor, with the odd couple, often strolling about. Spent the last 47 years of his life in Durham, passing away just short of becoming a centenarian. Inner: Charming and highly attuned to female attention. Felt he was like everybody else despite his diminutive size and always went out of his way to show it. Space oddity lifetime of playing with his ongoing sense of being special and unique in a host of different guises, while continuing to develop as a musician of uncommon gifts.

*

PATHWAY OF THE MUSICIAN AS GENTLY TROUBLED TROUBADOUR:
Storyline: The sad songsmith tries to span the bridge over his own troubled inner waters by making more of an effort to broach his tendencies for brooding reclusiveness in order to use his gifts to release his ongoing sense of inadequacies.

Paul Simon(Paul Frederic Simon) (1941) - American singer, songwriter and actor. Outer: Of Hungarian Jewish descent. Father was a radio staff musician who played the bass violin and eventually taught graduate courses in education, while proving loving and demanding of his sons. Mother was an elementary school teacher. One lookalike younger brother, Eddie, who also pursued a musical career. Teamed with Art Garfunkel, whom he had met in elementary school, in singing harmonies and entertaining at private parties, with the latter the superior singer and he the superior musician. Good athlete, and known as “rhymin’ Simon,” for his proclivities, although quiet, serious and shy when not performing. As Tom & Jerry, the duo had a hit single as teenagers, “Hey, Schoolgirl,” although failed with a follow-up, , while he remained extremely competitive with Garfunkel, resenting him on a number of levels, from the physical to the musical. 5’3”, hyper sensitive about his height early in his career, refusing to be photographed head-on. The two eventually separated, while he continued hanging around recording studios. Went to Queens College to study English literature, and, after graduation, entered Brooklyn School of Law, but his real interest remained in music. Rekindled his connection with Garfunkel and started playing gigs in NYC, before signing a contract with Columbia Records. Worked the folk circuit in London, and had his first number one hit with "Sounds of Silence" in 1965, which had been amped up by their producer, and the two quickly became popular harmonizing favorites. Played the college circuit as straightforward performers sans gimmicks and did concert venues at Carnegie Hall, while working extremely slowly in their follow-up albums, which were also well-received, and ultimately got them into the Rock’n’Roll Hall of Fame. Formally dissolved the partnership in their late 20s, despite being at their peak, so the two could pursue separate careers. Married Peggy Harper in 1969, their son Harper, became a songwriter and producer of psychedelic country and rock music with his own modest following. Divorced in 1975, although remained on good terms with his ex. His first solo album, “Paul Simon," sold a respectable 1.5 million copies. But it was with the next release, “There Goes Rhymin’ Simon” LP that he discovered a new form of chart-topping collaboration with the Swampers who were a renowned backup band with the musical sound that he wanted. Continued his successful output and starred in one film, which he wrote, One Trick Pony, about a journeyman rock’n’roller, as well as appearing on TV. Rejoined Garfunkel upon occasion for special concerts, and sporadically continued to write songs for the two to perform, although their connection remained tenuous and contentious. Experimented with various forms, and in 1986, opened the U.S. to the world’s music, via the South African-tinged "Graceland," which revitalized his career, as well as more finely tuning the ears of his audience. Married actress Carrie Fisher in 1983, one daughter from the union which ended in divorce the following annum. In 1992, he married singer Edie Brickell, a quarter century his junior, 2 sons and a daughter from the union. Spent much of the 1990s on a failed Broadway effort, "The Capeman,” and turned the century with an ill-received album. Inducted into the Rock’n’Roll Hall of Fame in 2001 on his own, and patched his relationship with Garfunkel at the 2003 Grammys, where they both received a Lifetime Achievement Award and then toured with him again, before finally releasing Surprise, in 2006, a somewhat disappointing collaboration with electronic musical whiz Brian Eno. Became the first recipient of the Library of Congress Gershwin Prize for Popular Song in 2007. After an argument with his wife got of hand, both were arrested for disorderly conduct in 2014, but quickly patched things and released a duet soon afterwards. A 2016 biography “Homeward Bound,” by Pete Ames Carlin, painted a portrait of a jealous, highly competitive performer who had a great need to be seen as a superior musician. Inner: Dreamy, sensitive, modest, with an all-abiding love for music in all its forms. Difficulty with handling criticism, as well as sharing credit. Politically conservative and curiously out-of-touch with the nonmusical world. Harmonizing lifetime of switching from the classical to the popular idiom, while dealing with his own inharmonious sense of inadequacies, despite his professional successes. Maurice Ravel (1875-1937) - French composer. Outer: Father was an engineer and industrialist of Swiss extract, who was also an amateur musician. Mother was of Basque descent. The family moved to Paris a few weeks after he was born, and one younger brother followed. Although he showed no strong inclination towards music, he began studying the piano at about the age of 12, and subsequently showed himself to be an excellent student at the Paris Conservatoire. 5’4”, slim and well-proportioned, with a large head and prominent nose. Enjoyed playing unconventional pieces, and evolved his own personal style by the time he was 20, synthesizing a balanced sense of the classical with daring innovation, thanks in large part to the inspired guidance of Gabriel Faure. Stylish and a follower of fashion who favored frilly shirts. Made his debut as a composer several years later, although was largely greeted with indifference and academic hostility, as well as being accused of plagiarizing from Claude Debussy (Luciano Berio). Failed to win the Prix de Rome, although continued in the same innovative vein, refusing to compromise his musical vision to encrusted, unimaginative tastes. Composed an opera, then the commissioned ballet Daphnis et Chloe, in 1912, which is considered his masterpiece. Despite his frail physique, he served as an ambulance driver at the front during WW I, until his health gave out and he had to take a rest cure. After the war, he lived and worked in seclusion in his villa, producing several ballets, and his famous Bolero, which made him the most popular musical figure in France. Never married, considering his art his life, may have been a crypto-homophile, although probably was too repressed to act on his impulses. Shunned all outward signs of fame, and rarely traveled, visiting the United States once and touring Europe as a guest conductor of his own works. In 1932, while riding in a cab, he had an accident and became partially paralyzed. Lost his powers of coordination, and music slipped away from him. Had to be operated on for a brain tumor, then spent 8 days in a semi-coma. Eventually died of a brain ailment. Tumors are always indicative of deep-seated anger, in this instance, in the cerebral sphere. Inner: Extremely private and reserved, with a good sense of humor and a penchant for practical jokes with his friends. Few close relationships. Passion for perfection, but also an ongoing feeling of his own physical inadequacies through a frail and smallish frame. Versatile, precise and learned. Spent a largely colorless life on the outside, everything went into his music, and tapping into his inner beauty. Contained lifetime of concentrating his emotional sensibilities on his art, while eschewing the usual trappings of fortune and fame, and doing battle with a deep-seated anger surrounding his projected inferiority. Charles Simon Catel (1773-1830) - French composer. Outer: Had several well-known teachers at the Ecole Royale, where he taught, beginning at the age of 15. Became an accompanist at the Paris Opera for twelve years, and also one of the leaders of the Garde Nationale band, for which he wrote a great deal of military music. Appointed professor of harmony at the new Paris Conservatoire, and wrote Traite d’Harmonie, which became a standard textbook in France for many years. Was one of the inspectors of the Conservatoire and became a member of the Institute in his early 40s. Wrote 11 operas, which were not successful, as well as a number of symphonies. A banal librettist, his strength was in his music. Eventually retired from music and became an amateur horticulturist. Inner: Quiet and lonely, with a very small circle of friends, once again divorcing himself from life and putting his raison d’etre into his art. Disassociated lifetime of being part of the musical establishment of France, leaving a legacy more as a teacher than a composer, before eventually giving into his desire for reclusiveness and unhappy introspection.

*

PATHWAY OF THE MUSICIAN AS SELF-DISMANTLING SONGSTER:
Storyline: The nervous dervish finally spins out of his self-induced, self-destructive trance to find both relative peace and full maturity for a time, after earlier blazing out in the whirlwind of uninhibited and unhappy self-expression.

Pete Townshend (Peter Dennis Blandford Townshend) (1945) - British singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist. Outer: Of British and Irish descent. Music was in his family for 3 generations, father was a saxophone player, and mother was a singer. Born 10 days after the German surrender to Allied forces in WW II. Both his parents toured extensively and ultimately opened an antique shop. His parents, who were often at angry odds, separated when he was young, and his mother proved promiscuous, bringing men home and telling her son to call them ‘uncle’. Ultimately went to live with a grandmother who was adjudged clinically insane. Grew up introverted and sensitive, particularly about the size of his nose. When two more brothers followed during his teen years, his insecurities grew even more pronounced. Originally taught by his father and encouraged by his mother, and initially inspired by church music. Went to work as a teenage tax collector for the British Inland Revenue, and also played in a Dixieland high school band, along with close friend John Entwistle. Attended Ealing Art School, and worked as a butcher’s boy and milkman, before leaving home at 16, and forming an early band, The Detours, with Roger Daltry on lead guitar. 6’, gaunt, with haunted eyes. Quit his jobs at 18 to devote full-time to his music. After personnel and manager changes, the group chose the name The Who in 1964, because of another band called The Detours, with Daltrey switching to lead vocals. British rock at the time was divided between the Mods and the Rockers, and the Who became an emblem of the Mods, with an emphasis on clothing and style. The band added the highly self-destructive Keith Moon the Buffoon, as drummer in 1964, and its basic personnel was set. Accidentally smashed his guitar during a club performance, and it became part of their act. Signed a record contract in 1965, and at year’s end, they released their first hit album, “My Generation,” with his penned line, “Hope I die before I get old,” as an anthem of sorts for his growing coterie of fans. Constantly in motion on stage with windmill arm motions, a nervous dervish with a profound inner rage, often destroying equipment and laying waste to hotel rooms. Had a great affinity for the American blues, and was later introduced to classical music, which gave his own work more of a baroque feel. Also got into electronic recording equipment, carrying around a movie-style lighting rig to give added visual pyrotechnics to his shows. Had a skilled manager and publicist which helped launch the band to international success with a steady stream of hit singles. Toured the U.S. twice, and was a big hit at the legendary Monterey Pop Festival in 1967. The following year, he married Karen Astley, the daughter of a composer, 2 daughters from the union, including Emma, who became a recording artist. Acted out the angst and rage of his generation, while dipping heavily into alcohol and drugs, but cooled out after meeting yogi Meher Baba. Wrote the rock opera Tommy afterwards, about a deaf, dumb and blind pinball player. Then penned Quadrophenia, about the tortured inner travails of the mod life. In 1978, Moon died of drug overdose, and the following year, while touring in Cincinnati, 11 people were killed in a stampede for the door. The group was devastated by the events, and eventually disbanded in 1982, although regrouped for a 5th anniversary tour seven years later. Returned to drinking as well as cocaine and heroin, but was eventually saved from total self-annihilation by neuro-electric therapy. Separated, then reconciled with his wife, adding a son to their family band. Lost a good deal of his hearing because of his high decibel performances, and also ground down his fingernails to their nubs from his enthusiastic playing. Co-produced "Tommy" on Broadway in the 1990s, and co-founded a small publishing house, while gradually reclaiming himself from the rigors of all-out performing and partying to reach full maturity after many a life of consuming himself in pursuit of his raging muse. Continues his own solo composing, while occasionally regrouping with the Who, despite his abhorrence of stadium venues. In 2003, he got caught trolling for child porn on the Internet, which he claimed he was using as research for his own abuse as a child. Never charged for it, although his reputation was besmirched by the incident, amidst suicidal feelings. After 40 years of marriage, his wife filed for divorce, following a separation of 15 years, threatening his £40 million fortune, while allowing him to marry his far younger girlfriend and fellow musician, Rachel Fuller. Performed at the 2010 Superbowl, with the Who, showing himself still to be in fine windmilling form, despite the vicissitudes of age and his recent rocky fortune. Published hs autobiography “Who I Am,” in 2012, portraying himself as a reluctant rocker, happier in his studio than on tour. Inner: Angry, alienated and supremely self-destructive. High energy, low self-esteem, but with a strong esthetic instinct to counterbalance his own shame at his projected outer ugliness. Longtime willingness to demolish himself in order to allow the beauty within to come forth. Eventually his rationality and intelligence prevailed, but not before a long downward spiral. Reclamatory lifetime of his usual sense of self-destruction, repeating antics from the past, but for once, not succumbing to them, and ultimately finding a sense of self-integration in the process, before evincing his earlier draws by getting caught with his proverbial fly open on the spidery Web. Sergei Yesenin (1895-1925) - Russian poet. Outer: Son of peasants, who moved to Moscow when he was 2, so that he was brought up by his grandparents, a pair of extremely devout Christians. His upbringing instilled within him a deep love of the countryside, which he later transliterated into his verse. Left his village at 17 for Moscow and worked as a proofreader. Blonde-haired and blue-eyed with a deep, resonant voice, he seemed to embody the very essence of the new Soviet male. Initially supported the Russian Revolution, and became one of its more prominent voices, publishing his first volume of poetry, “Ritual for the Dead” in 1916. His verse extolled the Russian landscape, along with the revolution, and his recitations, which often had him all but singing his imagistic words, while dressed in a blue peasant blouse, mesmerized his audiences with his sharply articulated passion and deep sense of loss over Russian village life. Often employed horse imagery, viewing himself as a crazed foal poisoned by the fiery breath of the industrial world. Married Anna Izryadovna, an actress, in his early 20s, and separated a year later, after producing a son. In 1918, he wed Zinaida Riykh, another actress, and the two had a daughter and a son together before they separated and then divorced, since he much preferred the life of the wandering poet to settled domesticity. Belonged to the imagist school which advocated absolute freedom of expression and independence for the artist, which caused him to reject the controlling tenets of Bolshevism, by the early 1920s. Celebrated “wooden Russia” in its icons and simple country images, which he called Otherland, in contrast to industrialism, which he abhorred. In 1922, he married the American dancer Isadora Duncan (Twyla Tharp) and emigrated, touring Europe and the United States, although both were accused of being Bolshevist spies, and were forced to make their impoverished way back to the U.S.S.R., where they lived in abject poverty. Deserted her, and married his secretary, Galiina Benislavskaya, while also fathering a son at the same time with the poet Nadezhda Volpin. Never saw his son, Alexander, who became a well-known poet in the late 1960s. His fifth and final marriage was to Sophia Tolstoya, the grand/daughter of writer Leo Tolstoy, who cared for him during his prolonged depressions. Drank excessively, snorted cocaine and smashed hotel rooms in his drunken rages, and was hospitalized for a while after a complete breakdown. Guilty over his self-imposed messianic role, he slashed his wrists and wrote a farewell poem in his own blood, before hanging himself in a Russian hotel room with the strap from his suitcase. Banned afterwards during the long reign of Joseph Stalin, he was finally and fully rehabilitated in the early 1960s, to remain one of Russia’s most beloved 20th century poets. Inner: Dual image of devout and simple peasant singer and rowdy and blasphemous exhibitionist. Hotel rooms would become an internal symbol of his nomadic unintegrated existence, and would carryover into his next go-round as well, as reflection of his own interior deathscape. Messianic lifetime of expressing himself in verbal rather than musical songs, with a similar overwhelming sense of self-destruction as an ongoing martyr to his unhappy muse. Modest Mussorgsky (1839-1881) - Russian composer and songwriter. Outer: Russian composer and songwriter. Outer: From a family of fairly wealthy landowners, although his grandmother had been a serf. The fourth son, with his first two brothers, both named Alexey, dying at the age of two. A quiet, cheerful and studious child, he showed an early disposition for music, learning piano from his mother, but was packed off to military school at 10, and destined for a career with the Imperial Guard. His musical talents, which included singing, won popularity for him, but through peer pressure, he also indulged in hard drinking, which would become a lifelong self-annihilating habit. In his late teens, he met unbalanced composer Mily Balakireff (Glenn Gould), who was to become the leader of a group of musicians celebrating the nationalistic spirit of Russian music. Studied under Balakireff, and then in 1858, he resigned his commmission to devote himself wholly to music. Initially showed little real capacity for composition or technique. In his early 20s, the serfs were freed, and his family became impoverished, beginning his downward spiral. Began to show a strong interest in peasant songs, proving to be a composer of extraordinarily lyrical short pieces. His masterwork was the opera Boris Godunoff, which was first performed in 1869, but was not fully recognized during his lifetime. Held an ill-paying government post, with no other resources. Despite his later reputation as a populist, he was always drawn towards power as a career bureaucrat. Never able to conquer his alcoholism, which stopped him from composing in the manner he needed. His works were later edited by Nikolai Rimski-Korsakov (Pinchas Zukerman), with much of their inherent darkness and originality removed, causing a huge controversy afterwards. Died after a final alcoholic epileptic seizure. Wrote operas, and dramatic and instrumental pieces, but is best remembered for his songs, which came from the accented patterns of ordinary Russian speech, and were the true evocations of the Russian soul. Inner: Song-writer supreme, his natural métier, with a wonderful ear for the melodies and rhythms of his language. Quiet by nature, although the harborer of considerable internal demons, which found their release through the grease of alcohol. Original, innovative and equally self-immolating. Idealistic, pessimistic, and virulently anti-Semitic, his heart filled with both love and hate. Immodestly self-destructive lifetime of being overwhelmed by his need to destroy in order to satisfy an equal need to create, in his ongoing struggle to balance the ugliness and beauty he has long carried within

*

PATHWAY OF THE MUSICIAN AS POET OF THE PEOPLE:
Storyline: The bandying bandmaster who took on the world with his overpowering crypto-martial personality, before retreating from it to try to give his own inner peace a chance, returns in female form with a highly vulnerable heart in order to try to re-integrate around his/her earlier dictum all you need is love.
Jessie J (Jessica Ellen Cornish) (1988) - English singer and songwriter. Outer: Of British and Irish descent. Mother was a nursery school teacher, and father was a social worker with a heart condition, which she inherited. Extremely close to both parents. The youngest of three daughters, with her two older sisters academically inclined, while she never was. Born with her umbilical chord around her neck, and almost strangled to death at birth. Discovered at 7 that she had an irregular heartbeat, and has felt fragile ever since, with occasional seizures. Sickly and skinny as a child, with periodic hospital stints and direct confrontations with death, all of which inspired her to write songs as a means of self-healing. Singing from a very early age, and, at 11, she appeared in a West End production of Andrew Lloyd Weber’s “Whistle Down the Wind.” Won a TV singing competition at 15, after more theatrical experience, then studied at the BRIT school, a performing arts institution. Joined an all-girl’s group, Soul Deep, for two years and graduated in 2006, with singer Adele in her class. 5’9”, slim with brown hair and brown eyes. Hooked up with Gut Records, although they went bankrupt before she could release anything, then signed a publishing contract with Sony ATV and found initial success as a songwriter for others, while also appearing on stage. After much maneuvering, she finally inked a record contract with Lava Records, and although she had begun recording her debut album, “Who You Are,” in 2005, it was not finished until 2011. The year before she released her first single, “Do It Like A Dude,” and subsequent singles, all of which were co-written and did well. Made her American TV debut on Saturday Night Live in March of 2011, and thanks to her album’s commercial success, she became a featured performer on the rock circuit, only to rupture several tendons in her foot, causing her to perform while seated on a gilded throne that summer, in a symbolic nod to her ever-rising musical status. Served as a voice coach for two seasons on “The Voice UK” in 2012 and 2013, all the while actively performing with a host of different partners. Released two more studio albums “Alive” and “Sweet Talker,” in 2013 and 2014, which were also commercial successes. The winner of several honors and awards, along with racking up sales in the millions, she is primarily an R&B singer and belter, with little subtlety to her presentations. Revealed she was bisexual, and was so taken aback by being such a constant subject of gossip in the UK, that she eventually decided to move to Los Angeles in 2014, where she felt more appreciated for her voice. Later backtracked on her claim to bisexuality, with the thought that she remains an icon and model for teens, and wants to affirm any unsurety they have about their own sexuality. Inner: Feels she’s part artist and part therapist, calling her fans Heartbeats. Inspires an extremely devoted following, per her wish to give ballast and strength to young girls’ lives. Oriented towards collaboration, in a crypto-nod to her previous go-round’s world-shaking involvement with the Beatles. Pounding heartbeat lifetime of switching genders as well as focus from the political to the personal as an ongoing avatar of his/her times, with the added onus of a vulnerable central organ that puts her under the same unpredictable death sentence that earlier terminated her, her last go-round in this series. John Lennon (John Winston Lennon) (1940-1980) - British poet, singer and songwriter. Outer: Of Irish, Welsh and 1/8 British descent. Mother was a former movie usherette, father was a ship’s waiter aboard a passenger liner, who abandoned the family, and the former took up with an alcoholic hotel waiter. Raised by his aunt, on the oddly named Menlove Ave., and became a sardonic truant with a foppish-tough “Teddy Boy,” attitude. Influenced by American rock’n’roll, his aunt bought him first guitar at 15. Formed a group with schoolmates, the Quarrymen, later added Paul McCartney, whom he was introduced to at a church picnic, and then George Harrison. The group broke up when his mother was killed in auto accident. 5’10”, with brown hair and brown eyes. Went to Art School, then devoted himself full-time to music, calling the new quartet the Silver Beatles, then the Beatles. They became popular in the port cities of Hamburg and Liverpool, ultimately adding Ringo Starr to complete the quartet. In 1961, they were spotted by promoter Brian Epstein, who managed his father’s record store. He immediately changed their look to a more androgynous one, and got them a contract, and within 2 years, had made them a popular English phenomenon, spawning ‘Beatlemania,’ which readily translated across the Atlantic as well in early 1964, through a memorable TV appearance on “The Ed Sullivan Show.” Married fellow art student Cynthia Powell in 1962, lookalike son Julian became a singer as well. He hid her from the world as she uncomplainingly watched his meteoric rise, while being forced to deny she was his wife. The duo divorced in 1968, when he took up with Yoko Ono, and she went on to marry three more times before dying of cancer at 75 in 2015. By the mid-1960s, they had become a world-wide craze, with hysterical fans galore, capitalizing on a youthful sense of rebellion that had been inaugurating with the assassination of American president John F. Kennedy. Their appearance in the U.S. soon afterwards, was an unconscious rejection of the adult authority world, which they underlined with their hermaphroditic look. As the group’s strongest personality, his acerbic wit was soon made evident in press conferences, along with a propensity for outrageous statements. Two movies, A Hard Day’s Night and Help helped cemented the personae of all four Beatles on the public consciousness, and they became the primary musical icons of the decade. Served as lead vocalist of the group and primary songwriter along with McCartney. Favored raw, shrill, belligerent lyrics to McCartney’s simple, whimsical melodic songs, although somehow the two were able to meld their talents. The Beatles’s Sgt. Pepper album, made in 1967, was an unconscious throwback to his earlier life as America’s march king, as well as other members’ previous incarnations in marching bands. Continued experimenting and expanding their appeal, briefly acting as disciples of Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, before becoming disenchanted with him. After seeing himself as Jesus Christ on an acid trip, he hooked up with and later married Japanese avant-gardist Yoko Ono in 1969, one son, Sean, who was born on his father’s 35th birthday, and became a performer as well. Met her at an exhibition where she was charging $10 to hit an imaginary nail with an imaginary hammer, and he offered her an imaginary $10 to do so. The union of the two signaled the disunion of the Beatles, which officially came about in 1970, while she cut him off from his first wife and son. Had a one-week anti-war “Bed-In” with her at the Amsterdam Hilton to protest martial violence. Began working with Ono and others, returned his MBE to the Queen as a protest, and re-emerged as an angry pacifist, while demonstrating against a host of social injustices. Pres. Richard Nixon subsequently tried but failed to deport him as a threat to domestic security. After the breakup of the Beatles, he began experimenting with primal scream therapy, while working out his psychological struggles in his post-Beatles albums. Had an 18 month affair with his secretary May Pang, at the behest of Ono, as a means of reinvigorating their own uneasy relationship at the time. Stopped making music altogether at 35, and spent his last years concentrating on his son, doing drugs, and trying to recapture his own lost childhood. Eventually shot in the back, shoulder and side with four hollow point .38 caliber bullets, as he was exiting a limousine in front of his apartment building. Subsequently cremated with his ashes scattered in NYC’s Central Park, in an area now known as Strawberry Fields, after one of his songs. His assassin was a deranged fan, 25 year old Mark Chapman, who identified closely with him, and had received an autographed LP cover from him earlier that day. Chapman was calmly reading J.D. Salinger’s "Catcher in the Rye," when the police arrived, and was subsequently given a life term, showing no remorse for his act, which outraged millions. Awarded a posthumous Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1991, and three years later, inducted into the R’n’R Hall of Fame. Some conjecture exists that his death was an ordered assassination by the CIA because of his activism, although no proof exists. Had a net worth of $800 million at the time of his premature demise. Inner: Angry, articulate, anti-authoritarian, forever challenging, questioning and probing his life, despite its enormous reach and influence. Admixture of working-class hero and world-class trickster. Had an obsession with the No. 9, since it and its combinations appeared on numerous important dates in his life from his 10/9 birthday, to his final emergency hospital run on 9th Avenue in NYC, where he died, which fell on 12/9, Liverpool time. Even his songs, “No.9 Dream”, “Revolution No. 9”, and “One After 909’, which was written at 9 Newcastle Road, all reflected it. Pugnaciously passive-fist lifetime of being a well-loved public icon while trying to integrate the enormous power he was given through his own puzzling sense of self, only to be swallowed up whole by it. John Philip Sousa (1854-1932) - American bandmaster and composer. Outer: Son of a Portuguese father born in Spain and a Bavarian mother. His father had fled Portugal during the revolution of 1822 and ultimately came to America. A highly cultured man, accomplished linguist and amateur musician, he became a trombonist in the U.S. Marine Band. His son was precocious, self-confident and demonstrated perfect pitch at the age of 6, when he began studying various musical instruments. Led his own band at 12, and at 13, tried to run away from home to join the circus, although his sire enlisted him as a boy musician in the Marines, where he rose to the rank of Warrant Officer at 19. At 21, he began playing violin, touring and directing theater orchestras. Returned to the Marine Band in his mid-20s as its leader, and held that position for a dozen years, before resigning and organizing his own troupe. Married Jane Bellis, an understudy singer in his mid-20s, 3 children survived him, although none became musicians. Liked his role as bandmaster because it had no set tradition, giving him the freedom “to be absolutely eclectic.” Never let a band play one of his marches the same way twice, and treated his musicians with great respect, never criticizing them or raising his voice in rehearsal. From his first concert onward, he was extremely popular, making several European tours and a world tour in 1910 and 1911. Interested above all else, in entertaining his audiences by directing his bands with firm precision. During the Spanish-American War, he was musical director for the Sixth Army Corps, and during WW I, he served as director of navy bands, and toured to raise money for Liberty Loan drives. Most noted for his marches, of which he composed about 100, as well as 15 stage-works, including 10 comic operas, some 70 songs and 12 suites, not to mention giving some 15,000 performances. In addition, he wrote his autobiography, 3 novels and more than 100 magazine articles. Close friend of Victor Herbert (Paul McCartney). An excellent horseman and sharpshooter, he was president of the American Trapshooter’s Association, and one of the richest, as well as most popular composers in the world. Died unexpectedly of heart disease in a hotel room after conducting a rehearsal. Inner: Genial, gracious, witty, multi-talented. Confident, vigorous physically, and had an equal ease with both royalty and working people. Viewed himself as a salesman of Americanism. Sgt. Pepper lifetime of focusing his considerable artistic talent on the rousing music of military marches, because it gave him the freedom of expression he craved, as well as the physical outlet he needed. Johann Bernard Logier (1777-1846) - German musician and inventor. Outer: Descendant of a French refugee. Father and grandfather were organists, and the former was his first teacher. Orphaned and was brought to England at 10 as a precocious flute player. Had a career in England and Ireland as a flutist, organist, piano teacher and bandmaster. Married the daughter of a bandmaster and with his brother-in-law, Thomas Willman (George Harrison), went to Dublin in his early 30s and opened a music shop, as well as conducted for a year in a Dublin theater. Several years later, he patented the chiroplast, a mechanism used to train the hands for playing the piano. Evolved a system of teaching based on its use and gave lectures on the subject. The Prussian government invited him to demonstrate the device and he remained in Berlin for 3 years teaching. His ideas were adopted by the Paris Conservatoire with modifications, as well as by composer Friedrich Kalkbrenner (Paul McCartney). Retired to Dublin in his late 40s with a considerable amount of wealth, and reopened his music shop to quietly enjoy the remainder of his life. Minor composer as well as a writer. Inner: Multi-talented with a focus on his teaching and his inventiveness, rather than his artistic creativity. Light bulb lifetime of enjoying acclaim for his peripheral skills, before retiring to socialize, think and reap the rewards of his efforts. Robert Cambert (c1628-1677) - French musician. Outer: Studied with court organist Jacques Chambonnieres (Paul McCartney), and then became organist at the church of St. Honore and director of the music to the French queen, Anne of Austria (Gloria Swanson). In collaboration with Abbe Pierre Perrin (George Harrison) he produced the first French musical comedy. He and Perrin obtained a patent for organizing the performance of operas in France, but because of financial mismanagement, lost the privilege to Jean Lully (Werner Herzog), although he was credited with composing the first French opera, Pomone in 1671. Went to London the following year, and became a military bandmaster. Tried to set up an English Royal Academy of Music based on the French model, but was poisoned by his valet (Mark Chapman?). Inner: Valet sparking lifetime of establishing the patterns and relationships that he would continue to explore in the 19th and 20th centuries, including death by an admirer who wished to be he.

*

PATHWAY OF THE MUSICIAN AS FINANCIAL ADEPT:
Storyline: The creative capitalist continually finds a way to spin his melodic threads into coffers of gold to become the richest collective figure in the his/story of music, through his mutual gifts for crowd-pleasing and accumulation.

Paul McCartney (James Paul McCartney) (1942) - British singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist. Outer: Of Irish, British, and Manx (Isle of Man) descent, with a touch of Scottish and Welsh. Father was a salesman for a cotton-brokerage firm, who had earlier been a partially deaf pianist. Mother was a visiting nurse. The former was Irish Protestant, and the latter Irish Catholic, and died of breast cancer when her son was 14. Originally played with his father, then joined John Lennon’s (Jessie J) group, the Quarry Men, after meeting him at a church picnic, adding discipline, a uniform look, and his practical nature to the group. 5’11”, with light brown eyes and dark brown hair. Began composing his own songs, which the competitive Lennon took as a challenge, and soon the two became a song-writing duo, melding their divergent styles. While Lennon’s was acerbic, his was whimsical and melodic. Although his father had wanted him to be a teacher, and he had gotten good grades in school, he went to Hamburg with the renamed Beatles, and after enjoying success there, returned to Liverpool, to become its top band, before going onto international fame and fortune, throughout the 1960s, via tours, movies and Beatlemania, a phenomenon marked by screaming, adoring fans, and the group’s androgynous, hirsute capacity to musically grow, despite their extraordinary commercial success. In 1969, after breaking off another engagement, he married a photographer, Linda Eastman, the daughter of a lawyer, with whom he would also work, despite her thin voice and reluctance to perform. Extremely close union, wife had one child from a previous marriage, duo had 3 together, including daughter Stella who became a successful fashion designer. Devastated after the breakup of the Beatles in 1970 and took to drink, although drew up the lawsuit that ended the group. Recovered and pursued his own successful career, teaming with his wife on an album, and then with the band Wings, writing the kind of simple, melodic songs he much preferred. After a disappointing start, the band became popular, although was later disbanded. Despite his conventionality, he was arrested for marijuana possession on several occasions, including a trip to Japan, with the law firm of his in-laws helping him to avoid any serious jailtime. During the 1970s, he began buying the copyrights on many artists’ catalogue of songs, making him the richest person in the his/story of rock’n’roll. Called by the Guinness Book of World Records as “the most successful composer of all time,” with a fortune eventually estimated at $1.5 billion by his 60s. His later work proved inferior and tepid, a return to his maudlin, mawkish lyrics and sugary melodies, including a critically ill-received attempt at symphonic music. Given a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1990, and at decade’s end he was inducted into the Rock’n’Roll Hall of Fame. Knighted in his mid-50s, then his wife of nearly 3 decades died of breast cancer in 1998, the same disease that killed his mother. Went into a period of drink and despair afterwards, before slowly re-emerging to try to heal the singular deep wound of an otherwise extraordinarily successful outer life. In 2002, he married a fellow vegetarian and disabled activist, Heather Mills, with a spotty past, who nevertheless, shared his devotion to charity, daughter from union. The couple eventually separated in 2006, amidst much rancor, and accusations of abuse on the part of his wife, after neglecting to make a prenuptial agreement with her, which ultimately cost him £24.3 or over $48 million, as well as secret angioplasty surgery the following year, brought on by stress. Mills’s antics, however, would alienate all public support for her. Extremely concerned with controlling his legacy, he reversed the traditional Lennon-McCartney credit to place his name first in his extensive catalogue of their works, in a petty show of holdover jealousy around their creative relationship. Became the first recording artist signed to Starbucks’ Hear Music label, in his ongoing wedding of commerce and commercial art, while releasing his most critically acclaimed album, House of Wax, in quite a while. Followed it in 2008, with Electric Arguments under the pseudonym the Fireman, showing he still was open to experimentation deep into his career. In 2011, he wed for the third time to Nancy Shevell, the 51 year old vice-president of a family-owned transportation conglomerate, putting their combined fortunes at some £700 million. Announced in 2015 he had stopped his daily intake of marijuana to provide a positive example for his children and grandchildren. Inner: Practical, down-to-earth, with a curiously old-fashioned musical sense, despite being in the forefront of the industry in the 1960s. Highly materialistic, with a gift for accumulation that superseded his own modest talents as a melodist. Always resented the fact that Lennon received more attention than he did. Deep pocket lifetime of enjoying immense popularity as part of the phenomenon of the Fab Four of the Beatles, before re-emerging to do what he always does best, writing and producing unchallenging music and making a great deal of money off of it, before suffering a great loss of the heart, and then trying to rebound from it. Victor Herbert (1859-1924) - Irish/American composer, cellist and conductor. Outer: Grandson of lightweight poet and composer Samuel Lover (George Michael). His father died when he was 3, and he and his mother went to live with her grandfather, spending his childhood in a cultured environment. Began taking piano lessons at 7 from his mother, who remarried a doctor. The family settled in Stuttgart, Germany where he was educated, studying at the Stuttgart Conservatory. Toured Germany, France and Italy as a soloist, and for 3 years was first cellist of the Court Orchestra at Stuttgart, where he studied composition, and did his first composing. In his mid-20s, he married a prima donna, Therese Foerster, of the Court Opera in Vienna, who was invited to come to the Metropolitan Opera house in New York, where she obtained for him the position of first cellist. Appeared frequently as a soloist, and then became associate conductor at the Worcester Festival. Succeeded P.S. Gilmore (Duke Ellington) as bandmaster of the 22nd Regiment Band, while also serving as guest conductor for a number of orchestras. Wrote his first light opera in 1893, which was a huge success and determined the rest of his career. Penned more than 30 operettas, which became his forte. Best remembered for Babes in Toyland, first performed in 1903. Tried his hand at full opera twice, although the form failed to reflect his light, melodious touch. Close friend of John Philip Sousa (Jessie J). Well-known bon vivant and epicure on Broadway with an extremely active social life, including membership in many Irish societies. Helped found ASCAP, to protect financial rights of composers after hearing one of his own tunes played for free in a restaurant, which may have been the shock of his crypto-capitalist life. Collapsed in his doctor’s office and died of a heart attack. Inner: Fat, friendly and jovial. Generous and impulsive. Cheerful lifetime of making the bridge between classical and popular music, and succeeding both artistically and financially, without any overt failures to temper his sense of well-being. Friedrich Kalkbrenner (Friedrich Wilhelm Kalkbrenner) (1785-1849) - German/French pianist and composer. Outer: Son of a theorist and composer. Born while his mother was on a journey. Initially studied with his father, and then after displaying a musical gift, he completed his education at the Paris Conservatoire, where he won prizes for piano and harmony. In 1803, he quarreled with his father, and went to Vienna, where he changed his piano style, after hearing Muzio Clementi (Richard Strauss) play. Performed in both Berlin and Vienna, and then came back to Paris in 1806, after the death of his father, to be a teacher, rather than a performer. Bought an estate at Rambouillet, and built up a prodigious reputation as a professor of music. Moved to London in 1814 for 9 years, returning yearly for a visit to France. In 1818, he began an association with Johann Logier (Jessie J), whose invention of the chiroplast, was a controversial instruction method for playing the piano. Made some innovations of his own, and added it as a tool in his teaching repertoire. Left England in 1823 and went to Germany to tour before returning to Paris, where he became associated with the Pleyel piano manufacturing works, ultimately becoming partner with its founder, Ignaz Pleyel (Ignace Paderweski), which made him rich. Married Marie d’Estaing, a general’s daughter, in 1825, his son Arthur became a pianist and composer, although did not possess his father’s skills. Became chief of a school, whose pupils included Mme. Pleyel, and in it he taught the Clementi method. Very facile as a composer, he also wrote a treatise on harmony for pianists. Despite being an uninspiring performer, he always had a ready audience and maintained an inflated reputation as a virtuoso, thanks more to his personality than his playing. Developed gout in 1836, which curtailed his performing, and 3 years later he was forced to retire, from a nervous disorder. Quite wealthy by the end of his life, he died of cholera. Inner: Inveterate name-dropping bourgeois who loved hobnobbing with royalty. Colossal vanity, highly opportunistic, with the facility for outward success in all his endeavors. Unchallenging lifetime of combining business acumen with a modest musical talent, garnering as much financial reward as he could out of the two mutual pursuits, a continuing theme of his. Jacques Chambonieres (Jacques Champion de Chambonieres) (1602-1672) - French composer and harpsichordist. Outer: Of noble birth, from a family of musicians. His grandfather had been harpsichordist to the king of France, and passed that position down to his son. His father was a French “sieur de la Chapelle,” and eventually did the same with his son, with the two of them ultimately sharing duties. A noted virtuoso on the instrument, he became court harpsichordist in Brandenberg and Sweden, and founder of the French harpsichordist school, and, as such, composer and harpsichordist to Louis XIV (Charles de Gaulle). Teacher of Robert Cambert (Jessie J) and Pierre Perrin (George Harrison), among others. The most celebrated performer of his day, he was more refined and subtle than brilliant or innovative, with a facility for ingratiating himself with royalty. Enjoyed celebrity, and gave personal concerts at home under subscription, hiring musicians for them, as the first nonroyal or aristocratic to do so. Wished to be seen as a nobleman first and a musician second, and pursued a luxurious lifestyle, which constantly put him in financial straits. After his first wife died, he married a second time in 1652, but his overspending caused extreme frictions in the union, and they separated 5 years later. A skilled dancer, he performed with the Ballet Royal, while also writing many dance pieces. Lost his influence, and fell into disgrace, before being forced to sell his title to a pupil. Published his pieces in 1670, the first printing of harpsichord music in France, and died two years later in poverty. Inner: Socially adept, moving easily within the provinces of power, until his own grandiose sense of self undid him, and unlike every future go-round in this series, he was ultimately forced to taste destitution and defeat. Royale lifetime of enjoying power, prestige and privilege at the French court, not to mention material reward, and exercising much influence through his easy-listening grace as an instrumentalist, before self-destructing.

*

PATHWAY OF THE MUSICIAN AS SPIRITUALIST:
Storyline: The mystical monk enjoys unprecedented public approbation and material reward as part of a magical foursome, before retreating into himself for some much needed reordering and repair around longheld beliefs surrounding suffering and seclusion in the name of holy healing.

George Harrison (1943-2001) - British singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and music and film producer. Outer: Of British descent with, some Irish, Scottish, Manx (Isle of Man), and Welsh. Father was a merchant seaman, later a driver of a school bus. Youngest of 4 children, with two older brothers and a sister. Enjoyed a carefree working-class childhood and learned music by listening to records. Schoolmate of Paul McCartney. Burned his report card and dropped out of school to become an apprentice electrician, but kept blowing things up. 5’10 1/2”. Began making professional appearances with his electric guitar, then joined the duo of McCartney and John Lennon (Jessie J), first playing together at the Casbah Club in Liverpool. The trio initially called themselves the Quarrymen Skiffle Group, then the Moondogs, then Moonshiners. Became the Silver Beatles for a two week tour of Scotland, then shortened the name to the Beatles. Afterwards they went to Hamburg, where they were quite popular, but had to leave since Lennon had no work permit, and he was less than 18. They became Liverpool’s most popular group on their return. Introduced their initial hairstyle after emerging from a swimmingpool with his hairdo in a mop-top flop. After several hit records, the Beatles became an English, then an American favorite, spawning Beatlemania, and by the mid-1960s, they were a worldwide phenomenon. Most spiritual member of the foursome, as well as the quietest, giving the group its later affinity with Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. In 1966, he married a London model, Patti Boyd, who later left him in 1974 for guitarist Eric Clapton, after the two had a guitar duel for several hours over her. Returned from India in 1968, quite changed, taking to drink and depression, while also embarking on numerous compulsive affairs, including one with Ringo Starr’s wife at the time. After the final breakup of the Beatles in 1970, he had an inner regeneration and began asserting his own sense of musical spirituality in his single albums, the first of the group to go solo, creating a mixed post-Beatle career for himself, including plagiarizing a tune for his hit, “My Sweet Lord.” Organized two charity concerts for Bangladesh in 1971, initiating that phenomenon, but after bad reviews of a tour in 1974, he went into virtual seclusion for the next 13 years. Divorced several years after his separation and remarried Olivia Arrias in 1978, and had a lookalike son, Dhani by his 2nd union, and the latter ultimately became his posthumous producer. Wrote a memoir, I Me Mine in 1979. Bought a secluded former nunnery of more than 100 rooms on 34 acres, produced movies, as well as albums, while maintaining his singular identity as one of the more magical, mystical voices of rock’n’roll, although grew sick of the entertainment industry, preferring seclusion. Joined old friends for the Traveling Wilburys, and began touring again in the early 1990s after a 17 year hiatus, although he developed throat cancer later in the decade, from which he recovered after quitting smoking again. Despite extensive security on his estate, he was attacked by a deranged anti-Beatles intruder in his home just prior to the millennium, and survived a knife wound in the chest, after he and his wife subdued his assailant, in an unconscious paralleling and transcendence of the fate of his longtime cohort Lennon. A lifelong smoker, he developed throat cancer again in 1998, and died of a brain tumor, symbolic of great, unspoken anger on his mind, and the 2nd life in a row where he would succumb to dis-ease in that arena. Ironically his memorial pine tree planted in LA’s Griffith Park was killed by beetles and had to be replaced. Inner: Sweet, gentle and highly spiritual. Good instrumentalist, with a genuine interest in his own inner life and growth. Mystically material lifetime of enjoying unprecedented success as part of a musical phenomenon without being overwhelmed by it, before withdrawing into himself in order to reorder his priorities and attempt to heal his ongoing creative wounds. Gustav Holst (1874-1934) - English composer. Outer: Family was originally of Swedish origin. Father was an excellent all-around musician, who married his former pupil. Mother was a pianist, who died when her son was 8. Had an unhappy childhood afterwards. Began his career as a village organist, then became a choir leader and conductor of a small orchestra, before he went to London to study at the Royal College of Music. In 1901, he married a soprano, Isobel Harrison, their daughter Imogen became a composer and conductor. Because of neuritis of the hand, he gave up the piano, and took up the trombone instead, joining the orchestra of the Carl Rosa Opera Company as a trombonist. Also played with the Scottish orchestra for many years, which gave him a working knowledge of instrumentation. Became music master of a school in Dulwich in 1903, and had a long career as a teacher. Extremely enthusiastic in that role, with a genuine desire to spread musical knowledge. Held numerous other teaching positions, including musical director at Morley College for Working Men and Women, where he worked until his death. Had a continuing strong interest in mysticism and eastern philosophy. After WW I, he went to Salonika, Constantinople and Asia Minor as a musical organizer for the WMCA in the Army Education Projection. Best known work of the 50 or so pieces he created was, The Planets in 1915. Frequently in poor health at life’s end, which was spent in relative seclusion. Fell off a platform in 1923 and his health deteriorated rapidly afterwards. Despaired during his bodily breakdown, but continued composing, although was very austere in his later works, until a serious operation fed directly into his death. A daughter wrote a biography of him. Inner: Highly spiritual, compulsive do-gooder and a gifted teacher, with a martyr’s need at life’s end for great suffering. Magical mystery tour lifetime of sharing his musical enthusiasms with many, while putting his deep sense of the mystical into the music he created, before becoming a victim of his unresolved need to suffer solitary penance for his success. Thomas Willman (c1783-1840) - English clarinetist and basset-horn player. Outer: From a musical family. Father was an émigré German bandmaster who came to England several decades before his son’s birth. One brother was a trumpet player, and a sister played the harp, while another eventually married Johann Logier (Jessie J). Received his early training in the East India Company’s volunteer band, then succeeded his teacher as bandmaster of the Coldstream Guards, playing for them until 1825, while also acting in the capacity as a gifted instructor. Prior to that, he played clarinet in a Dublin theater orchestra. Opened a music shop there with his brother-in-law Logier, as well. Also worked as a clarinet player for the Philharmonic and Opera Orchestra, beginning in 1817, until the year before he died. Noted for his remarkably beautiful tone, he played in festivals all over the country. Had an excellent facility for blending his music with singing voices, making him in great demand as an instrumentalist, not only by audiences, but fellow musicians as well. Wrote an instruction booklet for the clarinet, and was active his entire life as a performer. Inner: Virtuoso on his chosen instruments as a minor popular musical figure of his time. Partnership and teaching lifetime of continued association with longtime musical mate, while focusing on his playing rather than his composing. Pierre Perrin (c1616-1675) - French poet and librettist. Outer: From a poor background. As a young man, he married a wealthy widow of 61, although the union was soon annulled and he was incarcerated for debt. May or may not have been ordained a priest, since the record of his life is spotty, and began calling himself Abbe Perrin, for social expediency. Studied under harpsichordist Jacques Chambonieres (Paul McCartney) along with fellow student Robert Cambert (Jessie J). Produced texts for Cambert’s subsequent works, although he was a mediocre writer at best. Nevertheless, he was able to garner a positive reputation for his output, and, in 1648, he entered the royal employ of Gaston, duc d’Orleans, the younger brother of Louis XIII (Cecil B. DeMille), which introduced him to Italian opera. Obtained permission in 1668 from the French king, Louis XIV (Charles de Gaulle) for the privilege of founding an Academie de Musique, along with Cambert, which was the forerunner of the Paris Opera. Because of financial difficulties, however, he was unable to make a success of it, and was forced to resign his privilege. Inner: Weak character, who was continually hustling to make his way in the world. Linked lifetime of associating with the future Beatles in the French court, while pursuing a faux spiritual path, that would later turn real and mark all his lives in music, as a monkish mystic with a gift for ongoing partnership.

*

PATHWAY OF THE MUSICIAN AS MUSIC HALL COMEDIAN:
Storyline: The class clown adds the much-needed element of down-to-earth humor to a group musical phenomenon, keeping their collective temperament in check, while giving himself his own trickster take on being a sky-rocket celebrity, with a little help from his friends.

Ringo Starr (Rickey Starkey) (1940) - British singer, songwriter and actor. Outer: Of British descent, with some Irish.: Only child of a housepainter. Mother was an occasional barmaid, who gave him his nickname because of his predilection for rings. Spent part of his youth in hospitals because of his affinity for ‘p’ wounds: peritonitis, pleurisy and a fractured pelvis. Underwent a dozen operations, and his life was threatened for a while. Always tapping something as a child. Dropped out of school early and worked as an engineer’s apprentice, as well as other odd jobs. 5’8”. Thought of becoming a hairdresser, before he started drumming professionally, and went to Hamburg where he made friends with the Beatles. Eventually replaced their drummer Pete Best in 1962. Had a beard, but shaved it at the request of group. Although his musicianship was initially in question, he gave the band a needed leavening element of humor. Given further opportunity to display his comedic talents in the Beatles’ movies, A Hard Day’s Night, and Help. In 1965 he wed Maureen Cox, a hairdresser. Both his sons Zak and Jason, became musicians, while his daughter Lee became a fashion designer. The duo were divorced a decade later. Contributed occasional songs to the Beatles’ repertoire, most notably "With A Little Help From My Friends.” After the break-up of the Beatles in 1970, continued his own modest career with movie roles and concert appearances, enjoying his residual fame, and living in Los Angeles and Monte Carlo. Involved in a car accident with actress Barbara Bach, and the brush with death convinced the duo they were destined for one another, so that they married in 1981. Later had difficulties with alcohol and drugs, which necessitated a dry out at a detoxification clinic with his wife. Emerged a confirmed teetotaler, and resumed his sporadic touring and recording career, with his All-Stars. Maintains homes in England, Monte Carlo and Los Angeles, and published a book of Beatle postcards in 2003. Has released 18 solo studio albums and was Inducted into the R’n’R Hall of Fame in 2015, the last individual member of the group to be so honored. Inner: Good-humored and totally unpretentious, serving as a counter-balance to the far stronger egos of his fellow super-group members. Has an estimated net worth of $350 million.. Drum-rolling lifetime of dealing with a precarious beginning, an extraordinary follow-up of group fame, and then trying to keep his balance as an individual in its long aftermath. Alan Randall (?-1932) - English music hall star. Outer: His specialty was identifiable ditties of the lower classes. Inner: Good-humored and unpretentious. Eager-to-please lifetime of taking to the boards as a single act, and giving himself a show business foundation that would later allow him to integrate and ingratiate himself into an unprecedented cultural phenomenon.

*

PATHWAY OF THE MUSICIAN AS MERCURIAL WARLOCK:
Storyline: The shamanic showman carries a host of personae within his flamboyant frame, and when he lets them all loose at once, there is nowhere for his flaming incandescence to go but out.

Freddie Mercury (Farrokh Bulsara) (1946-1991) - Zanzibarian/British performer. Outer: Of Parel Indian descent.: Born on the island of Zanzibar, off the eastern African coast, where his father was a civil servant of Iranian extract. Both parents were Zoroastrians and born in Bombay, and he had one younger sister. Began studying piano at 7, and at 9, his family moved back to Bombay, where he went to private school, and formed his first band, the Hectics. 3 years later he emigrated to Feltham in Middlesex, where he grew up and became a naturalized British citizen. 5’9”. Got a degree in illustration and design at the Ealing College of Art, then worked in an antique stall with a fellow future band member. Played with a band appropriately dubbed Wreckage, among others, changed his name by deed poll, and then in 1971, formed Queen, a glam rock group with himself as lead singer. The other members, Brian May, Roger Taylor and John Deacon, would remain unchanged throughout the rest of its colorful two decade history. Through multi-tracking his voice and creating intricate harmonies around it, they established a unique award-winning sound, and began touring in 1973 with their eponymous debut album. The band became very successful in short order, while he developed an extremely exaggerated stage presence, draped in ermine robes and crowns. His prancing, preening performances, replete with smoke bombs and flashpots were complemented by showy music and the solid musicianship of one and all, and were geared towards huge stadiums. Wound up setting the record for attendees at a concert with over 230,000 in Sao Paulo, Brazil in 1981. Although the group established a huge following from a variety of sources, many were put off by his melodramatic stage presence, and they were censured for playing in South Africa by antiapartheid activists. Nevertheless, virtually everything they initially touched turned to gold, and they were able to remain productive until a dip in the early 1980s, caused by tensions by himself and the rest of the band. His offstage life reflected his onstage persona, with parties going on for days. Bisexual, he lived with Mary Austin, a London boutique owner, for 6 years during the 1970s, while expanding his various musical influences. Issued his first solo album in the mid-1980s, and the band regrouped mid-decade. Told them he had AIDS a couple of years later, although kept it a secret from his fan base. After a second solo album, “The Great Pretender,” he managed two more albums with Queen, while becoming increasingly more ill, and wound up publicly denying he had AIDS until right before he succumbed to it, dying at home of bronchial pneumonia, after going to such extremes to keep it secret, he had medical supplies delivered in record cover sleeves. Had a Zoroastrian funeral afterwards attended by only friends and family, in stark contrast to his very public life, and left his mansion and most of his fortune to Mary Austin, the only real constant in his life. Cremated with his ashes scattered on the shores of Lake Geneva. Inner: Flamboyant, decadent and self-destructive, a compulsive performer, who saw no difference between his life onstage and off. Had a four octave range, as well as four extra teeth, giving him an exaggerated overbite. In his embrace of extremes, also shy, suspicious and guarded about his privacy, in his need to maintain illusions about himself and overwhelming fear about being alone. Candle-at-both-ends lifetime of acting out the queen within, and releasing it, while consuming himself in the process. Peter Warlock (Philip Heseltine) (1894-1930) - Anglo/Welsh composer and critic. Outer: Father was a solicitor who died when his son was 2. His mother remarried and returned to Wales. Had a good rapport with his stepfather, while his uncle introduced him to composer Frederick Delius, with whom he also had a close relationship and who exerted a strong influence on him. Later wrote a book on his teacher/friend. Studied in Germany, as well as Eton College and spent a year at Christ Church, Oxford. Mostly self-taught, with an affinity for Elizabethan music and poetry and Celtic culture. A Conscientious Objector during WW I, but was classified as unfit for military service. Afterwards, he lived mostly in London, and began writing songs, carols and pieces under the name of Peter Warlock, while publishing criticism under his own name, and editing several collections of old English songs. Also founded a musical periodical, The Sackbut, which he co-edited for a year. As he got more into his alter ego, he would suddenly execute pirouettes on the street or on restaurant tables, viewing himself as a musical shaman. Created richly harmonic, masterly crafted pieces. An excellent scholar, but he allowed the darker side of him self to predominate and he took to both drink and excess, in Kent, with a fellow wild partyer, and found he had largely spun out his creative coin, forcing him to go back to criticism again, as his sole outlet. Deeply depressed, he committed suicide via gas in his flat in his 30s, although put his cat outside first in one final gesture of thoughtfulness. Inner: Dual character: Gentle, introspective and thoughtful as Heseltine; cynical, scurrilous and rambunctious as Warlock. Had a taste for both cannabis and flagellation, not necessarily in that order, as well as an interest in the occult. Dualistic lifetime of allowing both sides of himself full play without being able to satisfactorily integrate them, and ultimately blowing out the breath of both simultaneously. Matthew Locke (c1632-1677) - English composer. Outer: Early life unknown. Became a chorister at Exeter Cathedral, and then collaborated on several pieces of music for the stage, with the son of his teacher. Appointed Composer in Ordinary to Charles II (Peter O’Toole) shortly after the Restoration, and wrote several anthems for the Chapel Royal. Converted to Catholicism and became organist to Queen Catherine (Mary Gordon). Continued composing for dramatic works by English playwrights, as well as writing anthems, several suites and the first English work on the thorough-bass. Exchanged an acrimonious set of musical pamphlets with a critic. Some confusion in details of his life with another Matthew Locke of his time, as unconscious symbol of holding several different beings within his body and trying to integrate them into an intelligent, functional whole. Inner: Probably strongly driven to make amends for the career manipulation of his earlier go-round, locking himself into just one aspect of his multi-personality, and proving himself a solid musician and an important steppingstone in the evolution of English music. Unwarlock lifetime of working in collaboration with established works, while continuing to compromise his religious convictions for career advancement, after also waffling on them his previous existence in this series. John Dowland (1563-1626) - English lutenist and composer. Outer: Parentage and early education unknown. Became a page to a nobleman, and from his mid-teens to his early 20s, he served him when the latter took the post of the British ambassador in Paris, converting to Roman Catholicism while there. Returned to England, married, and got a musical degree from Oxford. Son from union became a lutenist to the king. Failed to gain a position as musician to Elizabeth I (Mae West), and traveled the continent, serving several foreign courts, while renouncing Catholicism. From 1598-1606, he was lutenist to the King of Denmark, visiting England twice, before returning there, and eventually becoming musician to James I (Kenneth Tynan), after suffering dire financial need in the interim. Although he was noted in his lifetime as a virtuoso lute player and singer, he is known to the his/story of music as the composer of art songs, making great advances in melodic and harmonic style. Inner: Queenly rejection would cause him considerable subsequent hardship, and, on some level, inspire a parody persona on his part later on to compensate for it. Peripatetic lifetime of mastering a musical form, while struggling with finances and spiritual convictions in his great desire to serve nobility, royalty and himself.

*

PATHWAY OF THE MUSICIAN AS CUDDLY CROWD-PLEASER:
Storyline: The conflicted collaborator labors best in creative partnership, although an inner sense of inadequacy propels him into a variety of addictions that match his outer draw towards adulation and fortune, and give him an inharmonious counterpart to his ongoing gifts for delightful melody.

Elton John (Reginald Dwight) (1947) - English singer and songwriter. Outer: Born in a house belonging to his grandparents. Father was a squadron leader in the Royal Air Force, who was rarely home, and was a totally controlling personality and nay-sayer. Afraid of him as child, while his mother had wanted a girl, making for an extremely unsettling beginning for him. Fat with an inferiority complex, he began playing tunes on the piano at 3. His parents divorced, and his progenitor continued as a negative force in his life, although his remarried mother encouraged him. At 11, he won a scholarship to the Royal Academy of Music and studied there for 5 years on Saturdays, with the initial intent of becoming a concert pianist. At 15, he began playing piano at a local club, then dropped out of school at 17 to pursue music full time. Played with numerous bands, taking his stage name from John Baldry and Elton Dean, with a Hercules added in the middle as a faux bridge of strength. Met Bernie Taupin, a lyricist, when both responded to an ad and the duo formed a highly productive partnership. The team wrote commercial jingles for a year and a half, before finding their true musical voice together. His first album was a moderate success, but not until he became a performer sporting outrageous clothes, displaying piano pyrotechnics and donning odd glasses that he became a rocket man and an international star. His performances finally freed him from both his childhood and his father. Enjoyed his first big performing success at the Troubador in Los Angeles, and by the early 1970s, he was on his way to the twin ‘f’s’ of fame and fortune. A virgin until 23, he became a non-step sex addict afterwards. Married his German tape operator, Renata Blauel, in his late 30s, divorced after 3 years, when drugs destroyed the union. Lost weight and gained self-confidence, although he became an addict to a variety of substances. Hooked on cocaine for 20 years, until seizures prompted a cleansing. A derivative composer with a huge record library, with the lyrics to his songs always written first, and the music following speedily afterwards. Announced his bisexuality to the world in his late 20s, another act of coming out of himself. Known as “Reggie” to friends. A big soccer fan, as an unconscious nod to his martial father, he eventually bought his own team. Later works and performances were less effective, perhaps because of a lack of integration of his stage character and his far more self-conscious real persona. In the 1990s, he sponsored an AIDS foundation. Inducted into the Rock’n’Roll Hall of Fame in 1994. Met a Canadian ad exec when in his mid-40s, and maintained a continuous relationship with him, then followed him with a longterm relationship with a filmmaker, David Furnish, and married him in late 2005. Had a resplendent 50th birthday, dressed as an 18th century French courtier. His excesses eventually caused him to borrow $40 million to pay off his debts, despite a personal fortune in excess of $250 million. Also had a pacemaker installed for a heart imbalance, unconsciously trying to correct a theme over many of his lives. Became involved with the Disney production of Aida, in another throwback to lives past, allowing him the opportunity for more melodrama behind the scenes in the fits and starts surrounding the production. Later blasted organized religion for its homophobia, in his ongoing need to publicly show himself, hissy fits and all. As an added capper to his celebrated career, he solemnized his 60th birthday in fine flamboyant fashion, with his 60th appearance at Madison Square Garden. Both he and DF fathered a son through a surrogacy program that mixed their semen specimens with a surrogate California mother. Later added a second son to their brood through similar means, while officially remarrying at the end of 2014, after a change in English law. In 2017, he contracted a “potentially deadly” bacterial infection in South America that landed him in the intensive-care ward of a British hospital for two nights. Has an estimated net worth of $450 million. Inner: Strong duality of character, opulent musically, less assured personally. Petty, insecure, spends over a million a year on flowers, as well as $400,000 a week on credit cards. Big glasses, small insights lifetime of coming out both musically and psychologically in order to gain a far greater measure of integration to his warring parts, although his later life would prove less satisfactory from a musical and performance standpoint. Arthur Sullivan (1842-1900) - English composer and conductor. Outer: Son of an army bandmaster and professor of the clarinet at the Royal military school of music. Maternal grandmother was Italian, giving his small-bodied frame a dark complexion and thick curly hair. One older brother. Entered the Chapel Royal at 12, and received his initial musical instruction there. Became the first holder of the Mendelssohn Scholarship at the Royal Academy of Music, and then was sent to the Leipzig Conservatory where he was given a comprehensive education as a composer, conductor and pianist. Returned to London in 1861 and became organist at St. Michael’s. Appointed professor of composition at his alma mater and produced some classical pieces, through which he gained his initial reputation by his early 20s, although he had to turn to light comic operas in order to make a living. After producing a couple he became associated with William S. Gilbert (Harold Pinter) in 1871, and together the duo set the standard for English light opera, although the two had only one success in their first decade of collaboration. Eventually they quarreled and separated after arguing over a carpet for the Savoy Theater during a run of one of their shows. Altogether he composed 14 operettas with Gilbert, with whom he had little else in common. Never married, although he had a longtime liaison with Fanny Carter Rolands, an American and amateur singer who was separated, but not divorced from her husband. The duo never lived together, nor did they publicly acknowledge their relationship, although it lasted the last three decades of his life. Had a strong sense of family obligation, and after his brother’s premature death in 1877, he brought up his eldest son as his own. Also remained closely connected to his widowed mother, who lived with her daughter-in-law and their remaining 7 children, as well as the ne’er-do-well who ultimately married her. Always considered himself a serious musician, but his true talent was for light opera. Suffered all his life from kidney trouble. Towards the end of his go-round, he drifted to Monte Carlo, where he indulged in gambling and extravagant living. Traveled often, and was eventually knighted in 1883 in an outwardly uneventful life that left an enduring legacy for the English musical stage, including The Mikado, The Pirates of Penzance, and H.M.S. Pinafore. His last days were agonizing, and he died alone at home of bronchitis and cardiac failure, after having been chilled. Inner: Sensitive and subject to much competitive sniping from rivals. Affable and social, and the total opposite of his aloof partner. Largely overworked, extravagant to a fault, with a thoroughly unintegrated feminine nature. Loved to gamble for high stakes, and pursued irregular work habits. Superstitious, as well as a heavy smoker, drinker and gourmet. Sullied lifetime of feeling that his true talents lay elsewhere, despite achieving enormous success in a specific popular medium, while overloading his senses with his various addictions and suffering mightily for them at life’s end. Giovanni Paisiello (1740-1816) - Italian composer. Outer: Began his career in church music, writing masses and psalms, but suddenly discovered he had a talent for opera buffa, writing several in succession in Parma. Did not gain wide recognition until he moved to Naples in his mid-20s. Married, but his wife was a victim of poor health. Used intrigue to discredit rivals and enhance his own reputation. Spent 8 years at the court of Catherine the Great of Russia (Indira Gandhi) beginning in 1776, at a huge inflated salary. Wrote the original Barber of Seville. Returned to Italy to become court conductor in Naples. In his early 60s, he was lent to the French emperor Napoleon Bonaparte to organize and direct the music of his chapel, and was treated like royalty in Paris. Returned to Naples, but because of the shifting political climate, he suffered a financial setback in his later years. His compositions were all simple and melodic. Wrote more than 100 operas, as well as church music, symphonies, concertos and other instrumental pieces. Inner: Highly competitive and jealous of others’ successes, with a strong drive for both recognition and wealth, which were denied him at life’s end. Me first lifetime of making the bridge between sacred music to light opera, which he would continue to explore in his next go-round, while also embracing a similar unfortunate end-life to temper his greed and thirst for fame. John Eccles (c1650-1735) - English musician. Outer: From a family of musicians that spanned three generations. Oldest son of a Quaker violinist and composer, who was also his teacher. Became one of London’s most popular theatrical composers, beginning in his early 30s, entwining his career with that of Ann Bracegirdle (Greta Garbo). Wrote music for about 46 plays, including William Congreve’s (Harold Pinter) Way of the World. Had an easy grace to his works, which made him extremely popular, thanks to his ability to gauge public tastes. Eventually, he retired from the theater although remained active as a court composer. Married, 3 daughters from union. From about the age of 50, he was master of the King’s Band of Music. Collaborated with Henry Purcell (Leonard Bernstein) in writing music for Don Quixote. A melodist who brought the Restoration tradition to a close, and far more a person of his time, than a musician for the ages. After retiring, he devoted his time to fishing. Inner: Highly social, and well-rewarded for his efforts. Harmonious lifetime of establishing his musical theatrical links, as well as working second-hand with a future memorable partner in a go-round that was largely free from strife. Thomas Tallis (c1505-1585) - English composer and organist. Outer: Childhood unknown, but probably a native of Leicestershire. Organist of the Waltham Abbey, before becoming Gentleman of the Chapel Royal under 4 succeeding English monarchs, sharing organ duties conjointly with William Byrd (Leonard Bernstein). Both were granted letter patents for the exclusive privilege of printing music and ruled music paper for 21 years. Married a woman named Joan in his mid-40s, who outlived him, no children from the union. Considered one of the fathers of English church music. Wrote madrigals and instrumentals, but is best remembered for his hymn tunes, services and anthems. Inner: Once again, found his strength in partnership, while leaving a melodic legacy that mirrored a harmonious adult go-round. Long-lived lifetime of enjoying musical power and privilege at the highest social levels, motivating him to stretch out his existence over an unusually long, and largely enjoyable span.

*

PATHWAY OF THE MUSICIAN AS INCORRIGIBLE TRICKSTER:
Storyline: The sly showman hides a serious teacher’s sensibility behind his never-ending bag of musical tricks, and manages to outrage, edify and entertain, while exploring all avenues of sound that fall under the aegis of his inventive mother-wit.

Frank Zappa (1940-1993) - American musician. Outer: Father had immigrated from Sicily as a child, while his mother was a first generation American of Italian and French ancestry. Eldest of 4, with two brothers and a sister. His sire had held a variety of jobs - barber, data-reduction clerk, metallurgist, high school math teacher and his/story professor, while playing a “strolling crooner” guitar. During his son’s formative years, he worked for the Dept. of Defense at military bases, but being foreign-born, gave the former a sense of otherness during his early years. His mother had been a librarian before being a fulltime mom. Spent a sickly childhood with lots of toys, and his family moved to Southern California when he was 9 for his health. Class clown and mediocre student, but an early exposure to avant garde composer, Edgar Varese, expanded his sense of music’s rhythmical possibilities, while he also avidly collected rock’n’roll singles, and dreamt of becoming a serious musical scribe as well. California gave him a sense of belonging, thanks to pachuco culture, and finding others with an affinity for R&B music. Formed the Blackouts in high school, then after one semester at two junior colleges, where he studied music theory, he dropped out to devote himself to becoming a performer. 6’, thin and mustachioed. Aside from two harmony courses, the rest of his musical education came from listening, with a particular fascination for sound for its own sake. Married Kay Sherman in 1961, divorced 5 years later, during which time he worked for a greeting card company. His disengagement, helped liberate his art. After doing cocktail music in local lounges, appearing on TV, serving 10 days in jail of a six month sentence on a sex entrapment charge and scoring 2 films, he built his own studio, Studio Z, in Cucamonga, and formed the Muthers, before started his own publishing company, Aleatory Music in 1963. The following year, he renamed his group the Mothers of Invention, and began playing L.A.’s freak circuit, while cultivating a long-haired Italian Renaissance look that underlined his role as one of rock’n’roll’s primary tricksters of the 1960s. Combined theater and audience involvement with oddball tricks, non-playing of music and other eccentricities, which won him a recording contract, and his first album, Freak Out! Continued experimenting with sheer noise, satirical protest and alternately expanding and contracting his group, while proving less than paternal with his crews, occasionally brutalizing them, and later withholding royalties. Established his own record firm, Bizarre-Straight, and movie-production organization by the end of the 1960s. Moved to NY and pioneered rock theater at Greenwich Village’s Garrick Theater. Married a 2nd time in 1967 to Adelaide Sloatman, 4 children from union, all of them performers: daughter Moon Unit had a hit with him, "Valley Girls," while sons Dweezil and Ahmet Rodan became rock personalities, and youngest daughter, Diva, began her own diva career after her father’s demise. Continued his touring, composing and musical tricksterdom, while disbanding and reforming the Mothers, until he finally ran out of his own inventiveness for them and permanently retired the concept. After legal problems in the 1970s, he worked on a solo career, ultimately founding his own label, Barking Pumpkin. Recorded electronic avant garde, a fusion of rock and symphonic, while maintaining his public posture as a musical prod against the tastes and temperament of mindless conformity. Also explored his more sedate side as a musician and composer, creating an eclectic legacy from the scatological to the serious. Testified before Congressional committees on freedom of speech, and did filmwork and more tours, showing himself to be a unique instrumentalist, a natural performer, and underneath it all, a teacher passionately dedicated to uplifting the musical tastes of his times. 5 months before his death, he realized a lifetime ambition of completing an album of Varese’s works, although it took years for it to be released. Died of prostate cancer, and his children put his espresso machine and cayenne pepper into his coffin. Inducted into the Rock’n’Roll Hall of Fame in 1995, and given a posthumous Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1997. Inner: Eccentric, flippant, good-humored, and highly original. Piercing intellect, but had difficulty in making emotional connection. Loved to tour, and largely ignored his family, sleeping during the day and holing up for long stretches in his cavernous basement studio in his Tudor mansion. His wife complained, he “did not do love.” Anti-drug, but addicted to black coffee and cigarettes. Musical perfectionist, and highly accomplished despite his seemingly bizarre body of work. Mischievous, but with a purpose. Nose-thumbing lifetime of bringing his ready wit to the masses, and making a bridge over into popular culture, after many lives serving the tastes of the intelligentsia, with the same sly, winking humor. Ferrucio Busoni (1866-1924) - Italian composer, pianist and writer. Outer: Father was a clarinet player descended from a family of peasant proprietors. Mother was from a German family, and was a pianist.. Spent his early childhood in Trieste with his grandfather, a commercial agent, since his parents were often touring. Received his musical education from his begetters and made his first public appearance as a pianist at the age of 7. His sire was reckless and unreliable and a severe taskmaster, imbuing in his son an insatiable ambition to be a virtuoso. Studied music at Graz in Austria and Leipzig in Germany. Began his career as pianoforte teacher at the Conservatory at Helsingfors in Finland and in 1890, married Gerda Sjostrand, the daughter of a Swedish sculptor whom he met there. It proved to be a very happy marriage for both. Their two sons both became painters. Taught in Moscow for a year and then spent three years in America at the New England Conservatory, which he found rather confining. Returned to Europe in his late 20s and settled in Berlin, which would be his home until his death. Through unrelenting practice, he became an adept virtuoso on the piano. Composed from his youth onwards, although was more facile than original. After the turn of the twentieth century, he concentrated much more on composing, looking to his Italian roots for inspiration, despite spending most of his life in Germany. Became a conductor, introducing numerous unknown composers to the public who would later become quite famous, including Claude Debussy (Luciano Berio) and Bela Bartok. In his mid-40s, he accepted the directorship of the Liceo Rossini at Bologna, hoping it would afford him the opportunity of becoming a musical force in his own country, but he was greatly disappointed by municipal resistance to his intended reforms. Sailed for America early in WW I, then rode out the war in Zurich. Went to Paris and London after the war, but his health was failing and his musical ideas became eccentric. Returned to Berlin and was appointed by the Weimar government to a special professorship for composition, where his best-known students were Kurt Weill (Harmony Korine) and Edgar Varese. His last work was the mystical, spiritual Doctor Faust, which was finished by one of his students. Eventually died of kidney disease, and was buried in Berlin. Wrote chamber music, numerous pieces for piano, and a host of essays and critical pieces on music, although his work was largely neglected after his death, until a revival of interest in him in the 1980s. Inner: Known for his delightful sense of humor. Felt all art was aristocratic, and was never interested in pleasing the masses. Thinker and philosopher, kindly and thoughtful to his students. Good-humored lifetime of bringing his ready wit to the classical idiom, where he served as teacher, composer, and savant, before returning as an inventive artiste to the masses. Baldassare Galuppi (1706-1785) - Italian composer. Outer: Born on the island of Burano in the Venetian Lagoon, which gave him his nickname, “Il Buranello.” Father was a barber, who played the violin in theater orchestra’s and was probably his son’s first teacher. Studied composition and the harpsichord under the chief organist at St. Mark’s Basilica, Antonio Lotti, and at 15, composed his first opera, which failed to find an audience. Small and thin. In his early 20s, he married Adriana Pavana. Ten children from the close union, three sons and seven daughters, with one son, Antonio, acting as a librettist for some of his father’s works. Served as harpsichordist for a theater in Florence for two years in his early 20s, then returned to Venice and presented a collaboratively written opera with Giovanni Battista Persceta. A second work by the two cemented his reputation and he began receiving commissions for both operas and oratorios. Appointed director of music at the Osepedale die Mendicanti in Venice, where he taught, composed sacred works and conducted, then spent a year and a half in London supervising productions for an Italian opera company, while also composing several works for them, and performing on the harpsichord. Returned to Venice and embraced the new operatic form, opera buffa, or comic opera, where his talents really shone. Adopted a trio of them for Venetian audiences and then composed one of his own, which was only mildly successful. Appointed vice-maestro of the Doge’s chapel, St. Mark’s, which spurred his ongoing flood of sacred works. At the same time he continued composing opera seria with the leading librettist of the time, Pietro Metastasio (Federico Fellini), who took umbrage at his placing the music above his words. Made a trip to the Vienna court in 1748, where he united text, music and story in a unique way, bringing opera up to a whole other level. In 1749, he found the perfect collaborator for comic opera in Carlo Goldoni (Frank Capra) a leading playwright of the time, and together the two enjoyed enormous popularity, honor, high posts, and fame throughout Europe during the 1750s. In 1764, he was summoned to St. Petersburg by the Empress Catherine (Indira Gandhi), to be court composer and conductor. Received permission to go, and, along with one of his sons, settled into his new position, composing several new works, while revising others and overseeing the court orchestra, while taking great delight in its choir. Left in 1768, and resumed his old positions in Venice, proving to be just as prolific in later age as in his youth. Despite declining health he continued to compose until life’s near end. Following a two month illness, he died and his passing was deeply mourned, since the was a much-loved figure. Inner: Extremely prolific in a host of different musical idioms from the sacred to the operatic. Strongly domestic, likable and highly agreeable, albeit demanding as a conductor, desiring to draw out the best in his musicians. Upbeat lifetime of etching his name large in his own musical times through dint of a workaholic sensibility and a genuine desire to bring beauty and joy into this world.

*

PATHWAY OF THE MUSICIAN AS QUICK-FINGER ARTIST:
Storyline: The bleak blues-master tunes into his earlier go-round to bring it to a more satisfactory conclusion, while suffering mightily in the process, before finally taking the right road to self-healing and expelling his demons within.

Eric Clapton (1945) - English guitarist. Outer: Father was a Canadian soldier stationed in England who refused to marry his mother and returned to Canada instead. His mother left for Germany, marrying another Canadian soldier, by whom she had 3 children. Left in the care of his grandparents. His mother returned to home when he was 12, and his grandparents tried to pass her off as his sister, although he wouldn’t accept the deception, which would lead to his ongoing problems with intimacy. Outside the house, however, he pretended his mother was his sister, and his grandmother was his mother. Experienced an alienated, belligerent working-class childhood, went to art school, but was later thrown out and worked construction with his grandfather. Took up the guitar at 17 and practiced obsessively. Very much interested in American blues, with a particular fascination for Robert Johnson, (Rick James), having learned his licks through listening to his recordings. 5’10”, slim. Worked as a street musician, played with several bands, while living a blues lifestyle, and searching for that genre’s purity in his music. Initially arrogant and diffident, and disliked by his bandmates for his unreliability. Recorded with a Chicago-style blues band, the Yardbirds, then split with them when they turned in a pop direction. Known as “slowhand,” for his deliberate changing of broken strings on his guitar. Joined John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers, all of whom would go on to fame with other groups. Their following proclaimed, “Clapton is God,” in graffiti around London, but he dropped out for a year, before organizing Cream, with Ginger Baker and Jack Bruce, after finally finding his musical equals, and by the late 1960s, he was the acknowledged master of his instrument, abetted by an extraordinary rendition of Robert Johnson’s “Crossroads.” Dissatisfied with the band’s direction, despite its overwhelming popularity, he disbanded and then joined the highly commercial, Blind Faith, finding faith himself with the mysterious appearance of a large picture of Jesus Christ inside a furled poster of guitar legend Jimi Hendrix, another of his personal idols. Addicted to cocaine as well as alcohol, he became embroiled in a triangle with Beatle George Harrison and his wife Patti, and he turned to heroin for solace, becoming a junkie, as well as an alcoholic. Recorded with a band he named Derek and the Dominos, once again using Robert Johnson in his long riff, “Layla,” which had been inspired by his feelings for Patti Harrison. She finally left Harrison for him, then was shocked at how disconnected he was from all aspects of life save for his music. Did virtually nothing for himself, and was occasionally so wasted on his tours that he would play lying flat on the stage, while fueling himself nonstop with whatever stimulant or depressant was available. Felt he would die before he was 30. Did not play for 3 years in public in the early 1970s, before finally kicking heroin through electro-acupuncture treatments. Abandoned the blues as too destructive to his being, and began looking towards other musical outlets, before recapturing his career, using more upbeat musical idioms, with the blues as texture, rather than a dominant force. Married Patti Harrison in the early 1980s, daughter from union, later divorced at the end of the decade, and continued his virtuoso career on a more upbeat level, which was reflected in his life as well. Went into alcohol rehabilitation, then had Conor, a son with an Italian TV personality and model, who later fell out of an apartment window in 1991, shattering him once again, as he returned to music to salve himself and give him a sense of continuance, with which he has struggled his entire life. After a decade of sobriety, he opened the Crossroads Center for drug and alcohol rehabilitation in Atlanta, where he maintains a 2nd home, after announcing an ‘addiction’ to helping people. Had a daughter with Melia McEnery, a young graphic artist in 2001, whom he later married, and announced he was retiring from touring in 2002. Had two more daughters, and finally found himself ‘normal’, much to his surprise and relief. Only 3-time inductee into the Rock’n’Roll Hall of Fame. In 2004, he released an album, Me & Mr. Johnson, in an integrative tribute to his projected past and present self, and in 2007, his warts’n’all autobiography, “Clapton,” was published. Inner: Sad-eyed, melancholy, and narcissistic, a total personification of the blues, with the virtuoso brilliance to live it on all levels and a drive to transcend his unhappiness and addictions. Extremely self-critical, largely humourless, and a perfectionist, a bluesman through and through, with music as his singular spiritual salvation. Crossroad lifetime of turning his profound unhappiness into virtuoso music, and in so doing, purging a great darkness of the soul that he has continued to carry, in a completely opposite milieu. Charley Patten (1891-1934) - American musician. Outer: Of mixed origin, had a light complexion, and may have been of Mexican extract, as well as part Amerindian. The family moved to a huge sawmill and cotton farm in Mississippi, when he was about 9, and he wound up spending most of his life in the Delta region. Learned to play guitar from a local master, Henry Sloan. 5’5”, 135 lbs. An accomplished performer by his late teens, he developed a fairly acrobatic act, playing on his knees, and behind his back, and inspired every Delta bluesman who followed him. Wound up with a common-law wife, singer Bertha Lee, whom he met in 1930, and later recorded with. Died of a heart ailment. Inner: Hot lick lifetime of mastering the blues guitar, in preparation for being a world figure on that instrument later on in the century, with the same penchant for living and singing the blues, no matter what his origins would be. Antonio Lolli (c1730-1802) - Italian violinist. Outer: Probably self-taught. Attached to the Court of Wurttemberg in Stuttgart during his 30s, and then stayed 5 years at the court of Catherine the Great (Indira Gandhi) in Russia. Spent the rest of his career restlessly traveling in Europe. Noted for his extraordinary technique, although he was indifferent to his musicianship. Played difficult pieces with great ease, but could not keep a tune or read music. Handsome, dandified, but viewed as a charlatan. Did some composing, but it was inferior to his extraordinary ability to play. Inner: Gambler and a rake, extremely extravagant, living the itinerant life of the classic bluesman, even before that genre had been invented. Hard-traveling lifetime of dextrous expertise on the violin without any real sense of discipline or understanding of his instrument save for his ability to caress heavenly sounds from it.

*

PATHWAY OF THE MUSICIAN AS FIERY PRODIGY:
Storyline: The forthright diva gives no quarter in expressing her true feelings, and serves as a highly charged and emotionally articulate voice for those who cannot express themselves as directly and definitively as she does.

Fiona Apple (Fiona Apple Maggart) (1977) - American singer/songwriter. Outer: Her parents, who met during rehearsals of “Applause,” in which her father co-starred, never married. Her mother, Diana McAfee, was a singer and dancer, while her sire, Brandon Maggart, was an actor. Younger of 2 sisters, with her elder sibling, Maude Maggart, eventually becoming an award-winning cabaret singer. 2 older half-sisters as well, with a third dying in a car accident, and two older half-brothers, including TV actor Garett Maggart. Her parents broke up when she was 4, and she stayed in NY with her mother, while her father moved to Los Angeles to pursue his career. Her mother remarried and divorced again, although she stayed close with her step-father. Ultimately used her first two names professionally. Overheard in the 5th grade saying she was going to kill both her sister and herself, and wound up in psychotherapy, which she felt only further alienated her. Began taking piano lessons at the age of 8, although stopped after a couple of years, and started writing songs at 11. Raped by a stranger at 12, who was never caught. Unhappy in school, she spent a year in Los Angeles, before returning to NYC and finally found some sense of release by combining her music with her writing. By high school’s end, she realized that song-writing and singing would be her career, and made the right initial moves to make it happen. Waif-like, with an ethereal beauty, and a projected nascent sexuality, with which she is not entirely comfortable. Her debut album in 1996, Tidal Wave, made her an instantaneous voice of fiery young angst, and both her initial 2 releases went multi-platinum, but a dissatisfaction with the record industry led her to contemplate retirement at 25. In 1997, she berated the MTV Awards audience for worshiping celebrities, while announcing, “The world is bullshit.” 3 years later, she began sobbing uncontrollably on stage after experiencing sound difficulties. Went into an inert funk for several years afterwards, coupled with a breakup with filmmaker Paul Thomas Anderson, and then finally returned to the recording studio. Her third album was shelved, amidst much rumor and several leaks, before finally being released in 2005, shoring her ongoing reputation as a voice that needs to be heard. Briefly married a French photographer, and continued tourng, although did not release her fourth album until 2012, at which point, she was busted for hash on her tour bus in a small Texas border town. Inner: Frank, provocative, highly emotional and angry, with a great need to be productive and find release for her unsettled sense of self. Often finds herself depressed when she finishes a song. Self-absorbed lifetime of turning her angst into art, and serving as a highly expressive voice for the young women of her generation. Amy Beach (Amy Marcy Cheney) (1867-1944) - American pianist and composer. Outer: Mother was a gifted amateur pianist, while father was a paper manufacturer. An only child, and remarkably precocious, she had a musical memory before she was 2, and could hum tunes in the key she heard them. Began studying the piano with her mother at 6, although had informally played it since she was 4, and was already composing simple pieces by that age. Home-schooled by her mother, as well. When she was 8, her family moved to Boston, and there she intensified her study, in hopes of becoming a concert pianist, although her Victorian parents were not supportive of the idea, preferring she lead a normal, more acceptable life. Because of that, she was largely self-taught as a composer, which probably ultimately limited her. Made her debut at 16, and at 18, married Dr. Henry Beach, an eminent widowed surgeon, and Harvard professor, as well as an amateur musician, who was older than her father, no children from union. He created a studio for her in his house, and her recitals were limited to one a year, which turned her interests from publicly playing to privately composing, after rigorously teaching herself theory and composition. Signed her works as Mrs. H. H. Beach, forgoing her own identity, and allowing herself to become a prisoner of convention. Became extremely well-known and respected for her songs, church music and piano pieces, and was considered the pre-eminent woman composer in America. After her husband died in 1910, she resumed her concert career in Europe for 4 years, particularly in Germany, where she was extremely well-received. After her return to America, she cared for a dying relative in New Hampshire, then moved to NYC where she spent the rest of her life touring in the winter and composing in the summer, including a one-act opera, which she completed in her mid-60s. Actively involved in the musical life of New York, as both composer and supporter, she died of heart disease. Inner: Completely undomestic, never cooked a meal in her life. Gregarious, charming, but also a creature of her time. Devout Episcopalian. Beached lifetime of acting as a prodigious prodigy, without the support, freedom of expression and guidance to give her a name for the ages. Nannerl Mozart (Maria Anna Mozart) (1751-1929) - German musician. Known as ‘Nannerl.’ Outer: Father was Leopold Mozart (Leopold Stokowski). One of 2 surviving children, and older sister of uberprodigy Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Stevie Wonder). Like her brother, she exhibited a precocious grasp of the clavier, and was taught by her domineering controlling father, while her younger brother lay in his cradle, picking up what her father was laying down. Taken with Wolfgang in 1762 to the court in Munich, where she and he were shown off, then hied to Vienna, where they received a far more enthusiastic reception. The family was greatly honored in a triumphant exploitation of the 2 young talents, and the following year, they made an extended trip through Germany that ended in Paris. After playing in the homes of the aristocracy to great effect, they made their way to London, and then back to the continent, finally returning to Salzburg in 1766. The next year both came down with smallpox during an epidemic, but survived, and continued their touring as prodigy phenomena, with Wolfgang gaining the lion’s share of attention. Stayed with her mother, while father and son toured Italy in 1769, at which point their careers diverged. Hers was allowed to wilt, while his gathered ever more momentum. Disapproved of her brother’s marriage, and wound up taking her father’s side when sire and son allowed their inevitable differences to rend them apart, and her own public career was long over. In 1784, she married Johann Baptist Franz von Berchtold zu Sonnenburg, an elderly ill-tempered baron and government bureaucrat, who was a widower and whom her father had picked out for her, since he had both a title and money. Had 5 truculent and resentful step-children, plus one surviving son out of 3, whom her father took initially from her. Blamed her father’s death on her brother, continuing to take her progenitor’s side even after his passing. Her husband died in 1803, and she spent many years torn apart by her brother’s fame and untimely end, suppressing her grief over their separation, and living out her own life in comfortable, albeit unfulfilled circumstances. Nearly blind at the end. Inner: Subservient, compliant, obedient. Blamed her brother for her life’s unhappiness, unable to see that her father had caused it. Prodigy lifetime of being given an early showcase, then shunted aside because of the transcendental abilities of her brother, making her come back as a singular sibling with a similar gift, but in an equally straight-jacketed society, so that it would take a good 2 centuries before her unique gifts would be equally recognized and saluted.

*

PATHWAY OF THE MUSICIAN AS PRODIGIOUS PRODIGY:
Storyline: The promethean pianist emerges quite early as a full package entertainer with a sufficient depth of intelligence and integrity to be a potential key voice for her generation and the generations to come.

Alicia Keys (Alicia Augello Cook) (1981) - American pianist, singer/songwriter and activist. Outer: Mother was Caucasian, father was African-American. Parents split when she was 2. Grew up in the Hell’s Kitchen neighborhood of Manhattan with her mother, Terri Augello, a part-time actress and paralegal, who continually pushed her daughter to study a variety of disciplines, until music clearly won out. Began studying classical piano at 7, but by 14, her teacher felt she had nothing left to impart to her, and she began studying jazz. Felt a particularly affinity for Frederic Chopin (Karlheinz Stockhausen), although grew up on hip-hop, and was floored the first time she became aware of soul music. Attended the Professional Performing Arts School and was already writing songs as a young teenager. At 14, she sang in a three-girl group called Embish’n, and came to the attention of both a vocal coach and a manager. Mature and striking, although subject to teenage angst during this period. Signed by Columbia records at 15, and also briefly attended Columbia Univ., after graduating as her class valedictorian at 16. Dropped out, however, because of her heavy recording schedule. 5’5 1/2”. Had difficulty composing her first album, Songs in A Minor, before finding a sufficient place where she could set up her recording studio, KrucialKeys, and in 1998, got out of her contract with Columbia, and signed with legendary producer Clive Davis and his newly formed J Record’s, which released her album in 2001, and it was a huge success, selling 10 million copies worldwide. Eclectic in her performances, and emotionally truthful in her songs, she is first and foremost a musician, working out her own perceptions of young womanhood through her music, with the potential of a long and highly successful career ahead of her. Won 5 Grammys in 2002, and her followup album the following year showed an affinity with the soul traditions of the 60s and 70s, and a further maturing of her prodigious talent. Able to mirror her musical abilities with her showomanship, indicating a brilliant career ahead on all fronts. Published a book of poetry in 2004, “Tears for Water.” With Unplugged, the following year, she saw her first three albums all debut at no. 1 on the national sales charts. In 2010, she wed music producer Swizz Beatz several months before the birth of their first child, a son, before having a second son with him four years later. Added to her Grammy collection in 2014 with an award for Best R&B album. Hosts an annual Black Ball to raise money to assist people affected by HIV and AIDS in Africa and India. In addition, in 2016, she released a 12 minute film short, Let Me In as part of her “We Are Here" movement which raises awareness of the refugee crisis currently affecting millions around the world. Inner: Bright, personable and real, while searching for truth through her music. Charitable activist, with a deep compassion for the sore oppressed. Prodigy lifetime of expanding her musicality to her voice and song-writing, as she works through the inevitable problems of fortune, fame and fleeting youth and learns to keep a proper perspective twixt the trio. Mary Lou Williams (Mary Elfreida Scruggs) (1910-1981) - American jazz pianist, composer and arranger. Outer: Of African/American descent. Mother was a classically trained pianist who would sit her on her lap and play, which influenced her to feel and experience music rather than have it as an abstract. Proved to be a prodigy with perfect pitch, and able to pick out tunes by 2. Her father abandoned family, and her mother supported her by doing housework, although was basically a party girl who liked to drink and allowed her children to largely raise themselves. Moved at 4 to Pittsburgh, mother remarried, and she enjoyed a richly supportive environment with eclectic musical tastes, ranging from ragtime to classical. At 4, she could hear a piece and immediately play it back. Learned from piano rolls and musicians who visited their home, and was performing for small audiences by the age of 10. Started playing professionally at 12 as a substitute for a pianist in a review, then had venues at private parties, silent movie houses and brothels, and by 13 was on the road. Married at 16 to John Williams, an alto and sax player. Learned from major pianists in her teens, who were all impressed by her boogie-woogie stride piano touch. Traveled with her husband’s band, and made her first recordings at 17. Two years later she became the arranger for her spouse’s band, when she finally learned how to read and write music. Stayed with them for twelve years in Kansas City, divorced, married a trumpet-player, and moved to NYC with her new mate at 32. The duo eventually joined the Duke Ellington band, while she enjoyed the reputation as one of the best arrangers in the music business, working for many of the top jazz performers. Split with her husband and after a year in NYC, became close with the young be-bop players and soon mastered that form. Her NYC apt. served as a creative workshop for the inner circle of be-boppers, while she organized bands and also gave solo performances. Began composing in the mid-1940s, and had her own radio show. Moved to Europe in the early 1950s, appearing in London and Paris, although walked off the stage in the latter city, frustrated with her lifestyle and playing nightclubs. Returned to the US and didn’t perform for 3 years. Instead, she gave herself to religious and charitable organizations in a spiritual reawakening. Converted to Catholicism in the mid-1950s, after years of visions of saints and demons. Priests would serve as both her spiritual and career guides, while she tried to be saintly, praying several hours a day. Helped young drug addicts, resumed her career in her late 40s and established Mary records, the first production company owned by a woman. Began teaching at a Catholic high school in Pittsburgh in the 1960s, as well as writing jazz masses. Also on the faculty of the Univ. Of Mass, Amherst and served as artist-in-resident at Duke Univ., her final four year gig. Won many awards and fellowships. Died at home of bladder cancer. Inner: Known as both “the First Lady of Jazz,” and “the Queen of Jazz.” Liked to brag that she “played heavy like a man,” and was constantly battling both racism and sexism. A curious admixture of being selfless and haughty, paranoid and determined, tempestuous and controlling, and steel-willed and insecure, thanks to being forced to continually battle for herself within the context of family, commercial pressures and maintaining her integrity as an artist. Hand-upon-the-wheel lifetime of asserting herself in every sphere, after an earlier go-round of being forced to take a secondary seat to her brother because of the restrictive tenets of the times. Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel (Fanny Mendelssohn-Bartholdy) (1805-1847) - German pianist and composer. Outer: Grandfather was the famous philosopher Moses Mendelssohn. Father was a banker and mother had been the daughter of a Jewish banking family as well. Her parents became Protestants and added the name Bartholdy to distinguish them from their Hebraic relatives. Father was cultured and an adept businessman who took great pleasure in his children, while her mother was musically inclined with artistic and linguistic skills. All 4 of their children had musical talent, and her mother became her first teacher, before her brother Felix (Leonard Bernstein) joined her in piano classes. The two were extremely close their whole lives and devoted to one another. The Mendelssohns fled to Berlin in 1811, and in 1816, all the children were baptised. Her father instituted a rigid and systematic education for his progeny with different teachers for different skills, all under the close supervision of their parents. Despite the love and devotion of her parents, her progenitor was a martinet, totally controlling his children’s lives. Their home became a major salon in Berlin, with weekly theatrical performances and regular Sunday musicales. Studied with the best tutors Berlin had to offer, as well as with acclaimed musical teachers both in Germany and Paris, when the family traveled to the latter. Viewed as a prodigy, but also as an ornament, and both her father and Felix forbade her from pursuing a public career, although she continued composing songs and playing on her own. Felix always respected her abilities, and often asked her advice, and ultimately 6 of her songs were published under his name. By her early 20s, her family began pressuring her to pursue her true career of domesticity, and the following year, she married a Protestant German artist, Wilhelm Hensel (Wim Wenders), who was supportive of her skills. The following year she produced her only child, a son, who would eventually become the family’s biographer. Several more miscarriages ensued, as she continued her composing, working on larger scales, and in 1837, against her brother’s wishes, she published one of her songs, and the following year she performed in public for the first time. In her early 30s she traveled in Italy, and saw this venture as the most inspiring period of her life, where she could compose the most freely. In 1842, her mother died, and she took her place leading the family’s sunday musicales in their Berlin home, while also appearing as a piano soloist. Died of a stroke during a rehearsal of one of her brother’s oratorios. Her death devastated him, and he followed her five months later, having lost the will to live. Composed some 300 songs during her lifetime, as well as solo piano pieces, but much of her material remains unavailable. Inner: Modest, unassuming, and yet very much aware of the limitations placed on her, despite a great desire to be recognized. Engaging melodist. Thwarted lifetime of enjoying access to many of the major minds of the time, only to be relegated to secondhand status because of her gender, a situation she would rectify in the century to come.

*

PATHWAY OF THE POET AS DECADENT SENSUALIST:
Storyline: The large-lipped exhibitionist gathers no moss in his all-out assault on convention, while finally learning how to integrate his affection for affectation and the outrageous, with a better regard for the physical vehicle that carries it.

Mick Jagger (Michael Philip Jagger) (1943) - British singer and songwriter. Outer: Father was a physical education instructor. Raised in a protected middle-class environment, and loved to perform at family functions, while showing himself to be an applause addict from 4 onwards. Childhood friend of Keith Richard, who later changed his name to Richards. Went to the London School of Economics on a government grant, and reconnected with Richards in London. The duo met Brian Jones (Billie Joe Armstrong) at a club, and the three decided to live together, and form a rock’n’roll band. Jones chose the name The Rolling Stones from blues singer Muddy Waters’ song. Added 2 more members and played in low-class dives for a year, to gain some authenticity. 5’10”, and lean-bodied, with dark brown hair and blue eyes. Their audience didn’t know what to make of his prancing antics, big lips and shaggy look, but the band became very popular, although most of the material was highly derivative of black American blues. Their first hit was penned by Lennon and McCarthy. Eventually the group found its own voice when he and Richards began penning original material. Remained a student at the London School of Economics for 2 years, until the band proved to be commercially viable. By the mid-1960s they were doing large concerts, as well as several tours of the United States. Very athletic and physical performer as the group’s lead singer, with a regimen for maintaining the demands of his prancing delivery. The Stones came to be seen as demonic corrupters of youth, an image they fostered with both their material and purposefully provocative look. Given stiff sentences for drug possession in 1967, along with Richards and Jones, although they were later suspended on appeal. Stopped touring for a while, and turned his attention to film, starring in Performance as an androgynous rock star. Eventually his friendship with Richards made Jones feel like an outsider, and after dropping out of the band, he was found dead in his pool of a drug overdose in 1969, which enhanced the group’s dark image. Fathered a daughter with American actress Marsha Hunt in 1970. After a further U.S. tour, the Stones gave a free concert in Altamont, California, in which Hell’s Angels, serving as bodyguards for beer, beat a fan to death with pool cues, all of which was captured on a documentary film. Years later, it would be revealed they attempted to assassinate him, but were thwarted by the benign hand of fate. Bisexual, had a celebrated brief affair with androgynous rocker David Bowie. In 1971, he married Bianca Moreno de Macias, a former model who was the daughter of a Nicaraguan diplomat, one daughter from union. Took up with 6’ American model Jerry Hall in 1976, ending his marriage. Although he vowed he didn’t want to be a 40 year old doing Satisfaction, the band stayed together for decades, making personnel changes several times. Eventually had a falling out with Richards, although the duo reconciled and continued to perform together as part of their self-promoted, “the world’s greatest rock’n’roll band.” After a decade and a half together, he married Hall, by whom he had 4 more children, and with whom he lived in a multi-million dollar Georgian mansion, although he continued his philandering ways. Eventually she sued him for divorce following 23 years together, after he impregnated a young Brazilian model. Appeared in several documentaries, and formed his own film company, Jagged Films, while maintaining his bad boy ways into his 60s, despite maintaining an ongoing discipline in all his forms of artistic expression, including film producer. Knighted in 2003, much to Keith Richards’s disapproval, who condemned the acceptance as extremely unStone. Devastated in 2014 when longtime girlfriend, American designer L’Wren Scott, hanged herself over her business failures. In 2016, the Stones became the first English group to entertain in Cuba, after earlier having had their music banned. Spoke Spanish to a crowd estimated at nearly half a million in an 18 song show that lasted nearly two hours, and kicked off their Latin American tour. At the end of that year, he and his girlfriend, 29-year-old American ballerina Melanie Hamrick, had their first son, and his 8th child. Has a net worth of over $350 million. Inner: Literate, intelligent, a collector of art and antiques, and an appreciator of his own wealth and fame. Exhibitionist, born to perform. Despite his hedonistic reputation, very health conscious. On average he covers 12 miles in his running, walking and jumping during a concert. Compulsive seducer, although capable of love in longterm relationship with Hall. Extroverted lifetime of enjoying great success as an artist, performer and libidinous celebrator of the sensual deep into middle-age, as a totally unique and uninhibited entity, with great sympathy for his own devilish ways. Algernon Swinburne (1837-1909) - English poet. Outer: Grandfather was a baronet who acted like a French noble and exerted a strong influence over his grandson. Mother was cultured and maternal and well-read in foreign languages, teaching her progeny both French and Italian. Second of seven children, with four sisters and one surviving brother, along with a second, a twin of one of his sisters, dying at six month . His mother and grandfather shaped him, while his dull father, who was an admiral, stayed in the background, ridiculing his son’s love for poetry, despite his own cultural inclinations. Thought to be dead at birth, then was nervous and slight as a youth, although he had a healthy, active childhood. Brought up a quasi-Catholic, and seen as a queer little elf at school. Red-haired and slightly over 5’, he had a large head, delicate features, round shoulders, and alternately danced as if he were on wires or sat immobile. Impervious to fatigue, he hardly slept. Educated at Eton, where he was bullied and introduced to flagellation, before leaving school early. Tutored and traveled afterwards, before matriculating at Balliol College, Oxford. Despite winning a prestigious prize there, his anti-authority attitude caused him to leave without a degree, even though he impressed all his teachers with his acute intelligence. While there, he came into contact with the Pre-Raphaelites, who would give him numerous important contacts later on. Lived on a small stipend in London as Pre-Raphaelite Dante Rossetti (Billie Joe Armstrong) guided and shaped him over the next decade. An early volume of poetry elicited little response, but a classical Grecian drama established him as a master of melodious verse, and he became a celebrity by his late 20s. Continued his penchant for flagellation, and remained an adolescent his entire adult life. His next series of poems were heavily criticized for their sensuality and anti-Christian sentiments. Became an enthusiast of Italian reunification, writing several songbooks in its honor. An epileptic, as well as an alcohol and drug addict, and a libidinous masochist, he garnered a notorious reputation for his antics and addictions. Came close to death in his early 40s. Nursed by James Whistler’s (Orson Welles) mother, then rescued by a writer who took him into his house and looked after him for the last 30 years of his life. Lived a closely supervised and highly ordered, as well as a monotonous, existence there, which probably motivated him to take better care of himself the next time around. His poetry suffered from overwriting, and his critiques were highly subjective, full of vituperation, exaggeration and flamboyance. Still, he managed to create some dazzling lyrics and memorable works, with a noticeable musicality to all he wrote. Died of pneumonia and alcoholic dysentery. Inner: Uninhibited character, loved sliding down bannisters, and challenging convention. Privileged, oddly magical little creature, full of high energy and equally reckless. Adored music, and had a floating gait, while being subject to involuntary movement of both his feet and hands. Always had military fantasies, but was too slight to actualize them. Possessed an incredible memory and knowledge of literature, and was fascinated with Scottish queen Mary Stuart (Marguerite Duras). Eternal child lifetime of remaining an adolescent in order to give creative vent to his brilliant boyishness. Geo. Alexander Stephens (George Alexander Stevens) (1710-1784) - English poet. Outer: Father was a London tradesman. Apprenticed to a trade but left it to join a strolling troupe. Despite being a talented actor, he was a convivial libertine so that his company was enjoyed by his fellow thespians, and he passed his time enjoying the moment with little thought as to his future. Fell ill, recovered, acted out buffooneries and wrote undistinguished poems. Came to London at 40, where he gained a reputation as a wit and a songwriter. A practical joker, he once tossed a waiter out a window. Toured America and pioneered in the monologue as a form of entertainment. His incompetence as a performer was overshadowed by his energetic animation. Highly successful with, “Lecture on Heads,” a series of characterizations on the follies of the day. Wrote a concealed auto-biography, History of Tom Fool as well as several feeble dramas. Continued performing, writing and hanging out and eventually retired at 70, at which time his mind gave out and he died an imbecile. Inner: Rough and ready wit, as well as an uninhibited sensualist, dedicated to enjoying himself. Transition lifetime of switching his mode of expression while overcoming obvious shortcomings to be a favorite on the stage, and allowing himself the personal freedom to explore his uninhibited character in socially acceptable ways, before totally emptying out. Il Rosso (Giovanni Battista di Jacopo di Gasparre) (1494-1541) - Italian artist. Outer: Called Il Rosso because of his red hair. Influenced by Jacopo da Pontormo (Keith Richards), among others. Became one of the founders of the mannerist movement, in which figures are elongated and distorted. Began his career painting frescoes in Florence, then moved to Rome. After the sack of the Eternal City in 1527, he worked in various towns in Italy, and eventually went to Paris in 1531, where he became the official court painter to Francois I (David Lloyd-George). Made director of the decorations of the great gallery in the Palace of Fontainebleu. Was given a huge salary and lived in luxury, enjoying the pleasures of the court, which in turn, enjoyed him. Accused his friend and assistant, Francesco dei Pelligrini (Billie Joe Armstrong) of stealing money from him and caused him to be tortured. To escape dishonor over the incident, he eventually poisoned himself. Inner: Well-mannered mannerist with a taste for power and luxury. Highly social and influential. Comeuppance lifetime of using art as a vehicle for power, and ultimately undoing himself with his own sense of acquisitiveness.

*

PATHWAY OF THE POET AS DEMONIC SAINT:
Storyline: The sensation seeker searches for both the darkness and the light within through excess, by both ignoring and embracing the sensuous, while continually looking for some sort of way to touch on the devilishly divine without self-destructing in the process.

Keith Richards (Keith Richard) (1943) - English singer and songwriter. Outer: From a working-class family struggling to become middle class. Maternal grandfather had a dance band in the 1930s. Father worked as a foreman in a GE factory. Childhood friend of Mick Jagger. Expelled for truancy from high school, but the guidance counsellor sent him to art school where he got into musical jamming. Ran into Mick Jagger on a train and renewed their earlier friendship, and then met Brian Jones (Billie Joe Armstrong) in small funk club, and the latter became the initial glue in creating a rock’n’roll band. The trio lived together and took their name, The Rolling Stones, from an old Muddy Waters song. 5’9”, lean and lined, with dark brown hair and dark brown eyes. The band got its big break with regular Sunday night engagements at the Crawdaddy Club outside of London, after serving their apprenticeship in dives. Appeared on TV, and manager Andrew Oldham realized their scruffy look annoyed parents, which further endeared them to teens. The group would go on to become the antithesis to their rivals, the lovable Beatles. Toured Britain with rhythm and blues stars from America, but never could get through a whole set because of fainting, screaming teens. Began writing songs with Jagger after their success with earlier derivative material, while adding an ‘s’ to his last name. Together the two produced raunchy, aggressive erotica with taboo themes, and became a worldclass band by the mid-1960s, thanks in goodly part to his skill on guitar. Always enjoyed touring and being up on stage. Bought a 15th century moated Sussex cottage, which was raided by police. Sentenced to a year in jail for allowing hashish to be smoked on his property, although the conviction was later overturned. Had a longtime liaison with actress Anita Pallenberg, who had originally been Brian Jones’s girlfriend, and shared his affinity for drugs, particularly heroin. 2 children from relationship. Played no concerts for 2 years after the bust. Because of back taxes, he moved to France. The group underwent personnel change after Brian Jones left and was later found dead of a drug overdose in his swimming pool. The Stones continued their unabated success, playing long world tours in the early 1970s. Busted in Toronto for 22 grams of heroin, and later pleaded guilty to a reduced charge. Married Patti Hansen, an actress model on his 40th birthday, 2 daughters from the union. His relationship with Jagger deteriorated after he gave up heroin and wanted to be more active in the business end. The group split, played with other bands, then resolved their differences and reformed, to continue their claim as “the world’s greatest rock’n’roll band,” deep into middle age, racking up record dollars on their subsequent tours. Chain smoker, and habitué of alcohol, with a pockmarked face deeply lined with both life’s pleasures and pains, and the look of an emaciated junkie. Fell out of a palm tree in Fiji in 2006, and suffered a concussion, forcing brain surgery, but emerged intact, and ready, as always, for more mischief. Served as the stylistic model for Johnny Depp for his hugely popular "Pirates of the Caribbean" series, and signed on for the third installment. Later admitted to a little funerary cannibalism by snorting his father’s ashes along with cocaine following the latter’s death in 2002, as a token of their closeness, although later denied the cocaine additive. In his 2010 autobiography, “Life” he admitted to strains in his relationship with Mick Jagger, while impugning the latter’s member as a “tiny todger,” a canard that would later be refuted by the latter’s wife Jerry Hall, as the product of jealousy and nothing more. Released his third solo album, “Crosseyed Heart” and first in 23 years, in 2015, showing a rougher musical style than his work with Stones, while also stating he wants his daughters to snort his ashes after he’s gone. Played Cuba the following annum, as the first English group ever to do so, after their music had earlier been banned, in an electric show that drew nearly half a million ecstatic fans. Has a net worth of nearly $350 million. Inner: Charming, intelligent, with a great love of performing. Gypsy shaman at heart. Personal sense of impurity, changes his blood once a year. Delightfully demonic lifetime of exploring the darkness within and the light without through drugs and music, and finding an odd balance twixt the two, while paying closer attention to his physical corpus as an instrument of potential ecstasy, rather than a vehicle to be totally ignored, as in lives earlier. Francis Thompson (1859-1907) - English poet. Outer: Son of a homeopathic physician. The family converted to Roman Catholicism, and his sister and 2 aunts became nuns. Dreamy youth, good student, but always in poor health. Educated at Upshaw College to become a Roman Catholic priest, but his health interfered, then he studied medicine for 6 years in Manchester, without getting a degree. Deeply affected by Thomas de Quincy’s (Malcolm Lowry) Confessions of an English Opium Eater, which his mother had given him. Struggled mightily to make a living, after settling in London, but became an opium-eater himself in 1880, and wound up a vagrant on the streets, suffering from ill health and poverty. Almost killed himself with an overdose of laudanum, but was saved by a vision of the unfortunate poet Thomas Chatterton (Shannon Hoon), who stayed his hand. Wrote prose and religious poetry for a journal while leading a totally marginal life. Best known for The Hound of Heaven, about the poet’s futile flight from God. Eventually was taken in by the writer Alice Meynell (Flannery O’Connor) and her husband, after he sent them a manuscript. They sent him to a hospital and then a Franciscan monastery in Wales in 1893, where he spent 4 years and found the only real peace of his life. Fell in love with Alice Meynell, viewing her as his perfect woman, although the duo became estranged through his imperialist views. Contributed literary criticism to journals and wrote an essay on Percy Shelley (Tim Buckley). Continued doing opium, and died of consumption, weighing only 70 pounds at his death. His work was noted for its brilliant imagery, although he had a tendency towards overwriting, as well as a lack of originality. Inner: Extremely spiritual, using drugs for visionary purposes. Totally unworldly, aesthetic and ascetic. Little connection to the outer world, completely inept at taking care of himself. Marginal lifetime of pursuing spirituality through drugs without the ability to look after himself, to see how far he could go on the kindness of strangers. William Falconer (1732-1769) - English poet. Outer: Son of a poor barber, brother and sister were deaf and dumb. Evinced an early interest in literature. Slight, weather-beaten and pockmarked. Joined the crew of a merchant ship, became a servant of Scottish laird Archibald Campbell (Ted Kennedy), then a purser on a man-of-war, where his literary pursuits were encouraged. One of 3 to survive a shipwreck. Contributed to magazines and wrote one popular song that was attributed to George Alexander Stevens (Mick Jagger). Chief poem was “Shipwreck,” published when he was 30. Joined the Royal navy at the behest of the Duke of York and became a midshipman while continuing his dual career as sailor and poet. Married the daughter of ship surgeon. Published political satire and a marine dictionary. Alternated employment with living in poverty in London. Turned down a publishing partnership for a purser’s job abroad a ship that was subsequently lost at sea, and perished, perhaps by burning and drowning. Inner: Cheerful, kindly, good companion, blunt thorough seaman. Shipwrecked lifetime of finding his spirituality and literary voice through the sea, and allowing himself to be ultimately consumed by it, and transformed through fire. Jacopo da Pontormo (Giacoppo Carruci) (1494-1557) - Italian artist. Outer: Father was a mediocre painter, went to Florence as a child, and ultimately took the name of his birth city. Studied under various artists, including Leonardo da Vinci (Gordon Parks) and Piero di Cosimo (Andy Warhol) then at 18, assisted Andrea del Sarto, who greatly influenced his initial output. Subtle draftsman and extremely precocious. Despite garnering an initial reputation of high promise, particularly among fellow artists, he never fully realized it. Became one of the leading mannerists, working for the de’ Medici family at intervals throughout his career. His later life was overshadowed by increasing pessimism and neurosis, and his work became more nervous and distorted as he grew older. Excellent portraitist, with a strong religious and mythological base to many of his works. Inner: Deeply spiritual, although unable to ultimately integrate his sense of vision with his canvases. Unhappy lifetime of experimenting with expression and the natural altered state of depression in order to bring forth the spiritualist within.

*

PATHWAY OF THE ARTIST AS INNOVATIVE ADDICT:
Storyline: The eternal bad boy continually loses himself in his convoluted interior, despite a transcendental gift for self-expression, thanks to an ongoing lack of any kind of road map for his tortured soul and a masochistic draw towards drowning in his own fears.
Billie Joe Armstrong (1972) - American musician, singer, multi-instrumentalist and actor. Outer: Of Scots-Irish, British and Irish descent: Father was a part time jazz musician and truck driver, while his mother was a waitress. 6th child with two older brothers and three older sisters. Began singing at 5, and used to go round to hospitals to croon to patients to make them feel better. Lost his sire to cancer of the esophagus when he was 10, while his mother continued waitressing to support the family. Later worked at the same restaurant as a busboy. Got his first electric guitar, “Blue” a Fernandes Stratocaster when he was 11, and it would remain part of his stable of instruments. His mother remarried a year later, and he became involved in the Bay Area punk scene, forming his first trio at 15 called Sweet Children, with boyhood friend Mike Dimt. Dropped out of high school his senior year to pursue his musical career full time, while selling marijuana to support himself. 5’7”, and slim with a predilection for black eye-shadow. With the loss of their drummer, Sweet Children regrouped and became Green Day, which would be his ultimate group. The trio traveled all over the country in an old bookmobile, with his drummer’s dad at the wheel. Married Adrienne Nesser in 1994, two sons from the union, including Jimmy, a drummer. Also involved with other punk rock groups, and is the co-owner of Adeline Records along with his wife and other partners. In 2004, he composed “American Idiot,” a rock opera, followed by “21st Century Breakdown,” in 2009, which proved a huge commercial success. Subject to periodic incidents redolent of the punk world, although also prone to addictions, particularly alcohol. Ultimately became a blackout drinker, while also suffering from dependency on pills for insomnia and anxiety, which would lead to a total public breakdown in 2012, and a stint in rehab, as he remains an ongoing work-in-progress, trying not to slip into the void that claimed him in direct lives previous to this incarnation. Green Day was inducted into the R’n”R Hall of Fame in 2015, its first year of eligibility. The same year, the documentary, Heart Like a Hand Grenade, which chronicled the Bush era album “American Idiot” was released, after being lost for a decade. Inner: Generous, charitable, with a warm heart and a giving personality. Admittedly bisexual, although without the need for empty seductions, per the usual r’n’r mode. Reclamation lifetime of trying to focus on the positive amidst his vulnerabilities so as to ultimately make his life into a brand new Green Day, defined by his significant talent and ability to both elevate and entertain. Brian Jones (Lewis Brian Hopkins-Jones) (1943-1969) - English musician. Outer: Of Welsh descent. Father was an aeronautical engineer who played organ at church, mother taught piano. Eldest of 3, with two sisters. Suffered from asthma throughout his life. Had an early interest in music, and was adept at a number of instruments, including saxophone, guitar and piano. Began skipping school to practice jazz on horns, despite being academically gifted. Eventually expelled at 16 for impregnating his 14 year old girlfriend. Also fathered a 2nd illegitimate child, and ran off briefly to Scandinavia where he started playing the guitar publicly. 5’6” with blond hair and dark brown eyes. Joined a rock group on coming back to England, before moving to London, where he worked as a conductor on a double-decker bus, an architect trainee, and a coal deliverer, before meeting Mick Jagger and Keith Richards at a club where he was playing blues slide guitar, and began rehearsing with them as rhythm guitarist. The trio became the heart of the Rolling Stones rock’n’roll band, which he had named. Shy, overly sensitive and soft-spoken, he had a foppish sense of fashion, which would become the mode for many British rock stars of the 1960s. Became the band’s initial self-appointed leader, as it established a bad boy reputation, and an antithesis to the concurrent rise of the clean-cut Beatles. After the band became hugely successful in the mid-1960s, he was arrested for drug use, following the arrests of the 2 leads. The quintet withdrew from performing for a while, after receiving stiff sentences, which were later suspended on appeal. Heavily into drug and alcohol abuse, he became increasingly more unreliable, while his liver and heart were badly damaged through all his excess. Couldn’t get a visa for a US tour, and wound up buying the former home of Winnie-the-Pooh creator A.A. Milne, his complete antithesis. Devastated when German actress Anita Pallenberg left him for Richards in 1968, he, in turn, abandoned the group in mid-1969, feeling he was being cut out and had advanced far beyond what they were playing. Much more musically adventurous than the other members, with a particular fascination for Moroccan music. Drowned in his own swimming pool a month later, as several house guests failed to revive him. In a tribute 2 days later, the band gave one of its worst performances, and thousands of butterflies, many of them dead, were released. Some mystery remains around his premature death. Inner: Angry, put upon, extraordinarily self-destructive, but also inventive, sensitive and adventurous, with a strong antipathy towards his own internal feminine. Extremely abusive to women.Gasping-for-air lifetime of severe self-destruction in the pursuit of renewed self-creation. Amadeo Modigliani (1884-1920) - Italian artist. Outer: From a cultivated, prosperous Jewish banking family, that maintained its dignity despite financial reversals. Mother was extremely sensitive and supportive of her son’s talents, and his homelife was cultured, coddled, intellectual and progressive. Father was a business failure, and was absent for most of his son’s childhood, while his mother taught in the home to support the family. Youngest of 4. Suffered from pleurisy and typhus, which cut his education short and put him on a pathway to become a painter, although he originally wanted to be a sculptor, with Michelangelo (Henri Matisse) as his personal hero. 5’6”, and curly-haired, flamboyantly carried himself like an aristocrat, with the sense his life would be short, after being diagnosed with tuberculosis at 16. Trained at fine arts academies in Florence and Venice, where he admired Italian Renaissance painting, before moving to Paris at 22, and joining the bohemian artist circles there in Montmartre. Remained in the City of Light the rest of his life, save for periodic travel. His early works all exhibited the influence of avant-garde French artists of the time, particularly that of Paul Cezanne (Alain Resnais). In the years before WW I, he concentrated on sculpture, working in a primitive style, reflecting African art. Returned to painting in 1914, and did portraits and nudes in an elongated asymmetric mannerist mode, for which he is known. Liked to paint fellow artists with one eye open and one closed, to show their dual focus on external and internal worlds. His health deteriorated further through substance abuse, as well as a sense of loss that many of his friends were in the military. An exhibit of his nudes was closed by police because of indecency, and he was viewed far more as a character than an artist during his lifetime. Had a stormy affair with an English poetess who supported him, then had a daughter with a young painter, Jeanne Hébuterne Joni Mitchell). Despite her devoted care, and a trip to the Mediterranean, his health rapidly deteriorated through tuberculosis and continued addictions to both drugs and alcohol. Died of tubercular meningitis in his mid-30s. Hébuterne, 8 months pregnant with their second child, killed herself two days later by jumping out a 5th floor window. After a decade, she was finally buried beside him in Pére Lachaise Cemetery, thanks to her parents finally relenting to have them together for eternity. Unknown during his lifetime, he became extremely popular afterwards with the lyrical grace of his elongated style, and a romanticized view of him thanks to several melodramas and books about him. Inner: Aristocratic, bohemian, handsome, assured, serious, intellectual and decisive. Also argumentative and impulsive. Felt to paint a woman was to possess her. Classic addict/artist, with an extreme draw towards self-destruction. Foreshortened lifetime of exploring the primitive and the modern from an extremely supportive base, while ignoring the vital needs of his own body. Dante Rossetti (Gabriel Charles Dante Rossetti) (1828-1882) - English artist and poet. Outer: 2nd of 4 children of an exiled patriot, poet and Dante (Ezra Pound) scholar, who became professor of Italian at King’s College. Father was introverted and melancholy, while his mother was the binding force behind the family. Brother of Maria Francesca (Anita Pallenberg), poetess Christina Rossetti (Joni Mitchell), as well as art critic William (Keith Reid), who became the uncle of writer Ford Madox Ford. Attended his father’s school, but left in his early teens to study art. Read widely, although was never much of a student. Nevertheless, he experimented with translations of early Italian poets, while also composing his own verse. Unlike his sire, he was completely nonpolitical. Short and slim with a sweet voice and penetrating heavily-lidded eyes, and a tendency towards moodiness and depression. Apprenticed briefly to Ford Madox Brown (Lindsay Anderson), then set up his own studio, and with friends Holman Hunt (John Boorman) and John Millais (John Schlesinger), he formed the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, which looked to artists of the early Renaissance for their inspiration, combining Romantic mysticism and truth to nature with careful minute detail, instead of painterly idealization. Also wrote poetry in a similar manner, and in 1861, translated his namesake Dante’s Vita nuova. Dissatisfied with the reception to his oil paintings, he turned to water color as a primary means of artistic expression. Established the 2nd phase of the Brotherhood, after the first group splintered, with William Morris (Philip Johnson), but his obsession with the latter’s wife, Jane Burden (Antonia Fraser), eventually estranged the 2. Engaged to one of his models, Elizabeth Siddall (Marianne Faithfull) but refused to introduce her to his family because of her lower social caste, and did not marry her for 9 years, until 1860, at which time she had tuberculosis. A year after their marriage she died from a deliberate overdose of laudanum, following giving birth to a stillborn child and falling into postnatal depression. Buried her with a sheaf of his poetry, then dug her up 7 years later to retrieve it., while also trying to communicate with her via seances. Had a longtime affair with Frances Cornforth, during all this time, who countered his romantic idealizations and illusions, with down-to-Earth warmth. Became friends with Algernon Swinburne (Mick Jagger), who moved in with him and drew him into his dissipated ways, so that his his home became increasingly chaotic. Returned to oils at this time, which proved popular, allowing him new affluence. Did translations from the Italian, but despite his successes as both an artist and poet, he became addicted to chloral and other drugs, and suffered moods of deep depression and paranoia, as well as insomnia and physical ills, both real and imagined. Engaged in a long-running literary feud, which also spent him, and, after a breakdown in 1872, he decided he had had quite enough of the larger world for a while, following a failed suicide attempt with laudanum, which left him comatose for a day and a half.. Passed the last decade of his life as a virtual recluse. His addictions took their toll, and despite a heroic effort at cleaning out, he suffered a mild stroke and died several months later from a dosage of chloral hydrate, old before his time. Inner: Intensely esthetic, with a highly addictive personality, both to drugs, alcohol and the women in his life. Impulsive, open, warm and charismatic, a two-sided figure often at war with himself. Largely devil-may-care, compulsively seductive and a deliberate courter of celebrity. Laudanum-laced lifetime of exploring numerous modes of expression, before succumbing to his basic romantic, melancholic, self-consuming personality, a spiraling draw he has yet to transcend. John Polidori (1795-1821) - English physician and writer. Outer: Oldest of 8 children of an Italian political émigré, who had been secretary to the exiled poet Vittorio Alfieri, before becoming a translator and then a writer in his own write, ultimately setting up his own press. Mother was English. Went to a Catholic boarding school, then became one of the first students at Ampleforth College, which was founded by some exiled French monks in England. Tall, handsome, with a melancholy look. Went to Edinburgh Univ. afterwards, where he got a degree in medicine, per his sire’s desire, while writing his doctorate on somnambulism, and composing a tragedy. In 1816, he became the personal physician to legendary bad boy poet Lord Byron (Bernardo Bertolucci), and served as his traveling companion during his initial exile from England. Settled in Geneva with him, and the household soon expanded to include poet Percy Bysshe Shelley (Tim Buckley) and his inamorata Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (Lynda Barry), as well as the latter’s half-sister, Claire Clairmont (Carrie Fisher). To amuse themselves, the highly literary crew began playing with ghost stories one night. While Mary Shelley invented the immortal Frankenstein, he is credited with coming up with the first vampire tale in English literature, basing his coinage loosely on Byron and a tale he told, and calling him Lord Ruthven, while making him an aristocrat who preyed on tasty blue blood. The tale, called “The Vampyre,” first saw print in a magazine in 1819, and to Byron’s extreme discomfort, was credited to him, while achieving spectacular European success. Lost his position via the latter’s competitive jealousy, and returned to England, after further travels in Italy, which saw him briefly arrested for insulting an Austrian army officer. Set up a practice in Norwich, then had a bad coach accident in 1817, which left him with some brain damage, from which he never fully recovered. Used his recovery time to pen “An Essay upon the Source of Positive Pleasure,” a screed on Romanticism. Moved to London, where he continued his literary output, while continuing to struggle financially. Attempted to enter the Ampleforth Priory, only to be rejected because of the reputation of his unsavory companions. Next tried to study for the bar, but fell into debt via gambling. Wrote a sacred poem, “The Fall of the Angels,” and then in a fit of depression, he committed suicide in his father’s town house via prussic acid, although the coroner claimed he died of natural causes. His sister married Gabriel Rossetti (Anthony Minghella), so that he became the posthumous uncle of Dante Gabriel Rossetti, his next life in this series. Inner: Restless, ungrounded and unhappy, with a whimsical and jealous temper. UnRomantic lifetime of vampiring his own existence, only to return in his own bloodline, in a subtle play at serial immortality, after introducing an immortal archetype to the canon of English literature. Sandro Botticelli (Alessandro di Mariano di Vanni Filipepi) (1445-1510) - Italian artist. Outer: Son of a tanner, but proved so trifling and profligate, that his father apprenticed him to a goldsmith in order to give him a hard-working environment to curtail his excess. Took his name from his master, then became apprenticed to Fra Filippo Lippi (Louis Malle), and later worked with Antonio Pollaiuolo (Banksy) and Andrea del Verrocchio (Luchino Visconti). Strongly influenced by all 3, before opening up his own workshop. Active as a portrait painter, he did a famous series of illustrations for Dante’s (Ezra Pound) Divine Comedy. His best known painting was The Birth of Venus, with the goddess emerging from the ocean on a seashell. Did elongated figures, with proportions secondary to their decorative value. Became a protege of the de’ Medici family, whose neo-Platonic stable also gave him the philosophic theory behind the art of his mid-career. Invited to Rome in 1481 by the pope to do papal portraits and several frescoes in the Sistine Chapel, where he also familiarized himself with the art of ancient Rome. Became an avowed disciple of the charismatic monk, Savonarola (Martin Heidigger) after his execution in 1498, and in his later years, his work took on a visionary quality, as he retreated from his grand canvases to work in smaller scale. Accused of sodomy, but charge was later dropped. Although he had a successful career, he had difficulties with finances at the end because of his carelessness with money, and wound up on crutches and in great physical pain, and unable to paint any longer,. Fell into both poverty and deep depression at life’s end. His reputation didn’t really rise until his rediscovery by Dante Rossetti, a later life of his, in the 19th century, along with the critics of that time. Inner: Self-destructive sensualist, who used his artistic skills to counterbalance a wastrel sense of being out-of-tune with the material world. Searcher for irreal beauty, and easily influenced by the strong personalities of his time. Often conflicted between the sumptuous tastes of his patrons and his own aesthetic piety. Self-defeating lifetime of escaping from the real world through visionary art, and yet very much a part of it through his connections and ability to render on canvas what he wished to see inside himself. Francesco dei Pelligrini (?-1541) - Italian artist. Outer: Friend and assistant of Il Rosso (Mick Jagger), with whom he worked in Fontainebleu, under the aegis of the royal court. Accused by Rosso of stealing money from him, and was tortured and put to death. His accuser drank poison afterwards, realizing the severity of his actions. Inner: Unknown character save for his betrayal death at the hand of a very dual figure in many of his existences, where he himself was a brilliant, but unstable light in the creative firmament. Torturous lifetime of giving himself self-destructive ballast to his Shiva-like artistic soul.

*

PATHWAY OF THE FILMMAKER AS PROFESSORIAL PICTURE-MAKER:
Storyline: The language-besotted lensman explores his hidden highbrow past in his sophisticated fare, in his ongoing role as taste-maker for his times via the popular mediums available to him.

mAnthony Minghella (1954-2008) - English filmmaker. Outer: Father was Scottish/Italian, while his mother’s ancestors were from central Italy. Second of five children, with two siblings, Edana and Dominic both becoming writers. Everyone contributed to the family business of manufacturing and locally selling quality ice cream, in a lively household that nurtured its various children’s talents. Rebelled over the Catholic boarding school to which he was sent, and ultimately found his life’s path at a grammar school where a teacher pointed him in the direction of drama. Played keyboards with several rock bands as a teen, and then went to the Univ. of Hull, before briefly becoming a university professor, at which point he began dabbling in writing both music and plays, in lieu of completing a thesis and pursuing an academic career fulltime. in 1975, he wed Yvonne Allport, a psychologist, one daughter from the union, which ended in divorce. In 1985, he married Chinese choreographer Carolyn Choa, who would go on to work as an actress and crew member on some of his films, while their son Max would become an actor. A stepdaughter Hannah would become president of production at Sony Pictures animation. Began working in TV in children’s drama for the BBC, as well as doing series drama, and did some stage direction, before winning the London Theater Critics Award in 1984 as most promising newcomer. In 1986, he won for best play with “Made in Bangkok.” Hoping to see it filmed, he wrote a screenplay for it, and when nothing happened with it, he decided to switch his métier to filmmaking in order to insure his work was enlarged to the silver screen. Began his cinematic career in 1991 with Truly Madly Deeply, a tale of love beyond death, an ongoing theme that fascinated him. Extremely meticulous, he usually took three years or so between films, while the finished product was always highly polished, literate and entertaining, although his actors and actresses were sometimes forced to transcend his wordy scripts. Best known for The English Patient in 1996, for which he won an Academy Reward for Best Direction, and which also pursued that theme. Also won plaudits for The Talented Mr. Ripley, which came out 3 years later, as he continued as a highly sophisticated filmmaker in an industry notorious for dumbing-down its product in order to insure the largest audience possible. Formed a production company, Mirage, with fellow director Sydney Pollack in 2000, although did not live long enough to realize it. A second love had always been opera, and he made his directing debut in that realm with Giacomo Puccini’s (Francis Coppola) “Madame Butterfly” in 2005. Made chairman of the British Film Institute, and also had a theater on the Isle of Wight named after him. Died unexpectedly of a hemorrhage after complications from surgery for tonsil cancer just five days prior to the TV premiere of his final film. Inner: Literary and cerebral, with a great love for both language and classical culture. Sweet, warm and funny with eclectic interests. Uncapped lens lifetime of switching his medium to cinema in order to continue to explore his various thematic obsessions in an accessible manner with the desire to uplift and expand, as well as entertain, his audiences. mFord Madox Ford (Ford Hermann Hueffer) (1873-1939) - English novelist, critic and editor. Outer: Elder son of a German refugee who came to England and eventually became an English citizen. The latter was an author, as well as music editor of The Times, while his maternal grandfather, after whom he was named, Ford Madox Brown (Lindsay Anderson), was part of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood of artists and poets of the mid-nineteenth century, a group started by Dante Rossetti (Billie Joe Armstrong), an earlier past-life son of his, who would also be part of the milieu in which he grew up, thereby directly passing down his own cultural seed to himself. Traveled on the continent to Germany and France as a youth, so as to get a broad cultural education. When his father died, the family moved to London, and he completed his education at University College School, but never went to college, having largely self-educated himself in languages, including Greek and Latin, as well as French and German. At 19, he converted to Roman Catholicism. His first book, “The Brown Owl,” was a fairy tale published in 1891, and was illustrated by his illustrious grandfather. Overweight, with a mustache and blonde hair, as well as the English predilection for bad teeth, which were made even worse by a smoking habit. Made up for his unprepossessing looks with excellent literary tastes and a phenomenal memory, which could quote verbatim long passages from classical literature. In 1894 he married Elsie Martindale, the daughter of an analytical chemist. Two daughters from the unhappy union, which was punctuated and punctured by his affair with his wife’s sister. Suffered condemnation for it and social ostracism from his set, which caused a nervous breakdown in 1904. The couple finally went their separate ways in 1908, although never officially divorced, because of his religious beliefs. Went on to a goodly number of relationships afterwards, including with writer Jean Rhys, who would describe their unhappy affair in “After Leaving Mr. Mackenzie.” Collaborated with Joseph Conrad (Jerzy Kosinski) on two novels, right after the turn of the century, and in 1908, founded The English Review, which would prove an excellent repository for early 20th century English literature, giving Wyndham Lewis and D.H. Lawrence their earliest exposure, among others. Lost control of the periodical two years later, during an affair with writer Violet Hunt, and also wound up spending 8 days in jail for refusing to pay child support at the same time. Best remembered for “The Good Soldier,” published in 1915, a tale of adultery and deceit twixt two couples, one English the other American. Served as a lieutenant in the Welch Regiment on the Western Front in WW I, which he would later turn into fodder for a tetrology published a decade later, after being shellshocked and severely gassed and invalided out. After the war he changed his name to Ford Madox Ford in honor of his grandfather, and did some farming in Sussex. In the 1920s, he found The Transatlantic Review, which gave the reading public the early masters of modernism. Served as a model for characters in several other works as well. Hung out in Paris’s Latin Quarter, where he befriended several of the literary giants of the time, including Ezra Pound and James Joyce, and was always an enthusiastic champion of the new, with a keen eye towards who would be who in the coming century, despite being firmly rooted in the past in his beliefs. Spent the last decade of his life shuttling between Michigan, where he taught and Provence where he ultimately died. His last partner was a much younger American artist, Janice Biala. Published over 80 books, and is seen as one of the founding fathers of English modernism. Inner: Particularly fascinated with the traditional British values and modern industrial society, which he would explore over and over again. Felt critics were far too pompous for his tastes. Taste-maker lifetime of putting his strong cultural imprint on both his times and in his work, as a double threat of discerning critic and talented novelist, a rare combination of discrimination and exposition. mGabriele Rossetti (Gabriele Pasquale Giuseppe Rossetti) (1783-1854) - Italian/English professor, patriot and writer. Outer: Became a librettist to the Naples opera house, as well as a curator of antiquities in the Naples museum. Had to flee the country for taking part in the insurrectionary movements of 1820 and 1821. Went into exile and lived for 3 years in Malta, before settling in London in 1824. His home would become a hotbed for fellow exiles, as well as a literary and cultural center. Married Frances Polidori, the daughter of another Italian exile, and the sister of John Polidori (Billie Joe Armstrong). Together they had four children, Maria Francesca (Anita Pallenberg), Dante (Billie Joe Armstrong), William (Keith Reid) and Christina Rossetti (Joni Mitchell). Provided a lively and stimulating household for his children, and taught Italian at King’s College in London, beginning in 1831. Wrote poetry in Italian, for which he was noted. Best remembered for establishing the esoteric anti-papal significance of “The Divine Comedy,” writing several works on the subject. Acted as an expert o nits author, the Italian poet Dante (Ezra Pound), and wound up penning an autobiography. Failing eyesight eventually caused him to retire from teaching. Inner: Cerebral and academically-oriented. Noted for his high character. Highbrow lifetime of political activism, followed by re-viewing his native culture through the alien eye of a foreign country, while raising an unusually creative brood.

*

PATHWAY OF THE POET AS SELF-ABUSING MUSE:
Storyline: The angelic chanteuse plays with demonic urges amidst her longtime compatriots, and finally manages to survive her excesses through the sheer dint of her will to prevail over herself.

Marianne Faithfull (Marian Faithfull) (1946) - English singer and actress. Outer: Mother was a baroness, who was originally from Vienna, and was of partial Jewish descent, with roots in the Hapsburg dynasty. When she was younger, she was a ballerina. Maternally descended also from the notorious Leopold von Sacher-Masoch (Paul Bowles), who lent his name to the sexual practice of masochism. Father was a British army office and college professor. Her parents divorced when she was young, and she grew up with her mother. Attended a convent school, where she was part of a student theater group. 5’5”, and quite angelic-looking, she began singing folk songs in coffeehouses in 1964, before being discovered at a Rolling Stones’ launch party by producer Andrew Loog Oldham, who cowrote her first hit with Jagger and Keith Richards, “As Tears Go By.” Had a number of hits afterwards, and in 1965, she wed artist John Dunbar, one son from the union, although her husband’s addiction to heroin abruptly ended the marriage. Took her son and moved in with Brian Jones (Billie Joe Armstrong) of the Rolling Stones and Anita Pallenberg, while hooking up with Mick Jagger, only to miscarry a daughter with him, while becoming addicted to cocaine. In 1967, she made her theater debut in an adaptation of Anton Chekhov’s (Billy Wilder) “Three Sisters.” The same year, she became the first person to say ‘Fuck,’ in a mainstream movie in I’ll Never Forget What’s ‘Is Name. Continued her stage work and also appeared sporadically on television. Soon afterwards, she was found wrapped only in a fur rug on a police search of Keith Richards’ home, to add to her bad grrl image. Turned some of her downward spiral into song, including “Sister Morphine,” for which she had to do legal battle in order to get credit and royalties. 1970 saw her hit bottom, as she lost custody of her son, while her relationship with Jagger ended. Struggled with both heroin and cocaine abuse during the 1970s, winding up homeless for two years, while suffering from anorexia. At one point she appeared on American TV dressed as a nun, while nothing seemed to work in getting her off drugs, including England’s National Health Service program, for which she became a very high profile failure. Her constant drug use lowered and cracked her voice, leaving it permanently blues-soaked. Continued her hand-to-mouth existence, although in 1977, she released a country-influenced album that did well. Despite being arrested for marijuana in Norway in 1979, she made a strong comeback at decade’s end with Broken English, made with a tell-tale voice that spoke of her years of hard-living. At the same time she married longtime boyfriend Ben Brierly, a punk rocker. Lived in Dublin, but continued her addictions through the first half of the decade, before finally entering rehab in the U.S. Had an affair with a fellow addict who leapt out of a window when it was over, and in 1986, she divorced her second husband. Continued singing, switching to blues and jazz, and in 1988, married writer and actor Giorgio Della Terza, only to divorce 3 years later. In the 1990s, she began exploring the music of Weimar-era Germany, in particular the works of Berthold Brecht and Kurt Weill (Harmony Korzine), earning more plaudits for her interpretations, while also appearing in “The Threepenny Opera,” in a role particularly suited for her, as Pirate Jenny. In 1994, she put out her eponymous autobiography, “Faithfull,” in which she faithfully recorded her life, loves, career and addictions, and soon after discovered she had hepatitis-C, a life-threatening liver condition, which helped her realize how precious her health was to her. As the century turned, she proved to be an enduring act for over more than 4 decades, exploring various musical genres, and collaborating with a host of top artists, as well as soloing on her own. Finally settled in Paris with her manager Francois Ravard. Able to catch a breast tumor in time in 2006, while continuing to work so as to have a soft cushion for her eventual retirement, and show herself that she is finally in control of her life. Inner: Bisexual, witty, and an admixture of both optimism and sadness, with a continuous search for both adventure and self-expression, tempered by a gradually lessening drive towards self-obliteration. Edge City lifetime of exploring her darkest corners, and showing the inner strength to eventually emerge from them as a true artist, after earlier succumbing to a similar drive towards self-obliteration. Elizabeth Rossetti (Elizabeth Siddal) (1829-1862) - English artist. Outer: 3rd of 8 children of an ironmonger. Grew up in a working-class environment, although was able to project an instinctive refined manner, despite having no formal education. Worked at a dressmaking and millinery shop, where her careful observation of customers allowed her to pretend to be who she wasn’t. Her gentle beauty impressed artist Walter Deverell, who asked her in 1850 to pose for him and his friends, who were in the process of forming the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, a group dedicated to re-establishing medieval art. Before long, she became the model for its spearheading force, Dante Gabriel Rossetti (Billie Joe Armstrong), appearing in nearly all his subsequent work. Possessed a frail, ethereal beauty, with heavy lids over agate-colored eyes and copper-red hair. Also had a remote languor, along with consumption, which gave her a deathlike look. Modestly talented in drawing, which was largely derivative of her partner’s work, Rossetti encouraged her and for a short time, she went to art school, ultimately producing drawings and water colors peopled with figures as remote-seeming as she. Also wrote morbid verse, which reflected her own life’s disappointments. Despite an initial passionate connection between artist and model, his attention waned, and he pursued other models, while never including her in family affairs. The ‘m’ word also never escaped his lips, despite their continual company, and she took to laudanum in recompense, which did nothing for her already frail health, as she grew weaker and more and more fragile. Plagued by guilt, Rossetti finally married her in 1860, and the following year, they had a stillborn child. Deliberately took an overdose of laudanum in a fit of postpartum depression, and committed suicide afterwards. Rossetti buried a book of his poems with her, and then seven years later, had her body dug up and the coffin opened to retrieve them. Inner: Melancholy and extremely fragile, a perfect muse for the aesthetics of the Pre-Raphaelites, although far too removed from reality for any real sense of self. Laudanum-laced lifetime of giving into her profound sadness as an unamused muse unwilling or unable to transcend her limitations by exploring her gifts.

*

PATHWAY OF THE POET AS MOODY LYRICIST:
Storyline: The iconoclastic icon maintains the integrity of her voice and vision, refusing to capitulate her hard-earned sense of power in a largely male realm, while remaining a unique figure in the ongoing story of lopsided western letters.

Joni Mitchell ((Roberta Joan Anderson) (1943) - Canadian/American singer and songwriter. Outer: Of Norwegian-Scottish descent. Mother was a schoolteacher, father was a Royal Canadian Air Force officer, as well as a trumpet payer in a marching band before he became a grocery store manager. Suffered polio at 9, that was so severe, it was though she would never walk again, but she recovered via art and music. Began smoking at the same time, which would ultimately limit her voice range. Became a painter and enrolled in the Alberta College of Art, thinking to make a career in commercial art. Had a daughter by a fellow student, Chuck Mitchell, then hastily married him in 1965 in hope of creating a home for their child.. The relationship didn’t work and she had to give her up for adoption, not seeing her again for another 3 decades. Played music for fun, and worked at a local coffeehouse called “The Depression.” Continued painting, and doing album covers, but music soon became her primary career. Established a reputation in Toronto as a folk singer, taking her stage name from her middle and married name. Moved with her husband to Detroit, only to divorce him, but kept his last name. Went on to NYC, and won a following there on the folk circuit. Awarded a record contract and had a hit single, “Clouds,” in 1969 and her career took off. Moved to Los Angeles, and expanded her musical interests, as her lyrics became denser, as if she were conversing in music. Began experimenting with both rock and jazz after taking time off from performing, hooking up with the dying bassist Charlie Mingus in 1978. In 1982, she married her bassist, Larry Klein, only to divorce 12 years later. Never considered commercial by radio or MTV, who both ignored her, although she had a sufficient fan base to go her own way, and weather low sales on her more experimental albums, over which she had complete artistic control as well as publishing rights, while using her own artwork on virtually all her album covers. Despite her longtime anti-industry stance, wound up a winner of 4 Grammy awards. Reunited with her daughter and grandson in her 50s, after the former initiated a search, bringing a sense of completion to her life. Her voice aged on her later works, thanks to her smoking, moving from sweet soprano to rough alto, although she has continued to remain a singular figure in the folk-rock pantheon as an emblem of intelligence, experimentation and independence. Inducted into the R’n’R Hall of Fame in 1997, and given a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2002. Eventually found the world of records far too corporate, retired from it, and turned to painting, which had always been her first love, as her primary means of self-expression, and in 2006, had a showing of an anti-war mixed-media installation. At the same time she returned to composing new songs, as well as collaborating with the Alberta Ballet in a piece called “The Fiddle and the Drum,” in busy response to the end-of-the-world sentiments being expressed by both the planet-at-large via its climate changes, and the apocalyptic mentality gripping the powers-that-be. Forced to stop performing because of a mysterious and very rare medical condition called Morgellons, which some doctors feel is a delusional belief that they are infected with subcutaneous dis/ease-causing agents. Found unconscious in her home from a brain aneurism in early 2015 and brought to intensive care, where she revived, as her health continues to decline. Has a net worth of $245 million. Inner: Moody and melancholic, with a musical sense of language. Despite being a feminist icon, prefers the company of men. Self-confident, independent, extremely strong-willed and outspoken, with the desire to be neither looked up to, nor looked down upon. Iconic lifetime, once again, of creating a unique voice for herself, this time around through both her music and the cascading poetics of her lyrics. Jeanne Hébuterne (1896-1920) - French painter and muse. Outer: Father was a senior accountant for Le Bon Marché, a department store, and had a passion for 17th century French furniture. Raised in a petty bourgeoise Catholic household, where her sire would read philosophic works out loud to his family. Both she and her older brother André showed a facility for drawing, which her parents encouraged, and both went to art school, she following him at the École des Arts Décoratifs and then at the Académie Colarossi.. When her sibling returned from active duty In the Great War, he used her as a means of becoming part of the Montparnesse struggling artistic community. Served as a model, before pursuing her own art career. In 1917, she met artist Amadeo Modigliani (Billie joe Armstrong). The duo quickly fell in love, and she cohabited with him, despite her parents strong objections. She became his primary model, and in 1918. they moved to Nice, in the south of France, where she gave birth to a daughter. Returned to Paris the following spring, and she became pregnant again. as her husband’s health declined precipitously through TB and substance abuse, which would take his life at the beginning of 1920. Although her parents brought her back home, two days after her inamorata’s death, she committed suicide by jumping out of a fifth floor winder, killing both herself and her unborn child. Initially buried in a nearby cemetery, until a decade later when her family moved her remains next to Modigliani’s in the Pére Lachaise Cemetery in Paris, with her epitaph reading, “Devoted companion to the extreme sacrifice.” Her daughter was adopted by her husband’s sister and only learned of her true origins years later, which occasioned a biography of him by her. It took decades before her artwork was finally publicly shown. Inner; Gentle, shy and delicate, and very much into the feminine. Also quietly rebellious and very much her own woman. Broken heart lifetime of quickly running the full classic romantic gamut of deep abiding love and early death, which would augment her contemplative moodiness the next go-round in this series. Christina Rossetti (Christina Georgina Rossetti) (1830-1894) - British poet. Outer: 2nd daughter of Gabriele Rossetti (Anthony Minghella), an Italian-born political exile who settled in the UK and became one of the first professors of Italian in the country, teaching at King’s College in London. Mother was English-Italian with a devout evangelical bent, who initially home-schooled all her children and exerted a strong influence over them. Sister of Maria Francesca (Anita Pallenberg), Dante (Billie Joe Armstrong), and William Rossetti (Keith Reid) and youngest of 4. Her home was a meeting place for years for other Italian patriots. Enjoyed a strongly intellectual as well as a loving domestic environment, all 4 children became writers and were brought up as Anglicans. Later broke off 2 engagements because of religious differences, and never married. Ardently Anglo-Catholic in her beliefs. Had a nervous breakdown at 15, thanks to a neurotic obsession about vanity and idleness as well as a change in temperament from vivacious to bottled-up, and wound up stabbing her arm with a pair of scissors. Ill for most of her teens, she spent her life in various family homes, taking care of her father until he died in 1854, then her mother until her death in 1886, and finally 2 aged aunts. In 1857, she had a major religious crisis, which inspired some of her deepest poetry. Worked with child prostitutes at the Highgate Penitentiary in her 20s. Became a highly original poet, and part of the Pre-Raphaelite movement, which her brother helped spearhead, serving as model for some of their artwork, as a prototype of medieval beauty with her pale, large-lidded eyes and long hair, while they served as inspiration for some of her poetry, which was published in their magazine, “The Germ,” under the name Ellen Alleyn. Her work was inconsistent, capable of beautiful and sensuous lyrics as well as banal thoughts, while using her gift for self-expression and technical mastery over language in a variety of poetic forms to counter-balance the sorrows and frustrations of her largely repressed life. Diagnosed with Grave’s disease in 1872, she became stout and matronly-looking, which made her more reclusive as she grew older. Suffered most of her life from ill health, with a host of illnesses, including angina, neuralgia and various abscesses and swellings, although they also allowed her to be excused from leaving home and working as a governess, as was the custom for spinsters of her time, and permitted her to dedicate her time to herself. Ultimately died in great pain of cancer. Inner: Strong independent spirit with a discriminating moral intelligence. Despite an enforced life of care-taking, brought a deep emotional sensibility to it as well as strong spiritual feelings. Opposed women’s suffrage, and had a biblical view of the secondary role of women, although she felt gender would be transcended in the hereafter. Well-educated but oppressed lifetime of working off of a strong intellectual and spiritual family foundation in order to make herself a listened-to lyrical voice of her time, despite her accepted second-class citizenry, and her funneling of her emotions into her work rather than her life, save for her periodic emotional crises.

*

 

PATHWAY OF THE POET AS LIGHT AND DARK SPIRITUALIST:
Storyline: The outrageous occultist exhibits a tendency for extremes, whether she pursues conventional or unconventional pathways, in her ongoing exploration of her own considerable powers be they in the godly or satanic realms.

Anita Pallenberg (1944-2017) - Italian/English/American actress, model and writer. Outer: Mother was a German secretary and father was an Italian artist. One older sister. Became fluent in 4 languages, including English, at an early age, allowing her to travel and live in Germany and NYC, where she appeared with the radical Living Theater, and was involved with Andy Warhol’s Factory, as well as worked as a successful model, appearing on several high-profile magazine covers, including “Vogue”. 5’9” with dark brown eyes and blonde hair, as well as a willowy figure. Settled in London, where she hooked up with Rolling Stone Brian Jones (Billie Joe Armstrong) in 1965, before leaving him for fellow Stone Keith Richards in 1967, which devastated the former, despite his having been an extremely abusive partner. Also may have completed a Stone trifecta with a rumored liaison with Mick Jagger during the filming of Performance, which she helped co-write and in which she also appeared. Served as the muse for several Stone songs during this period. Had a son and a daughter from her decade-long union with Richards, as well as another son who died soon after birth. Played a shaping role in the development of the Stones during the late 1960s and early 1970s, as both a sounding board and a singer of background vocals, while also becoming involved with heroin. Her fascination with the dark arts and the occult seeped into the Stones’ public image, while she served as their demonic muse. Cast spells against people she didn’t like, most notably Bianca Jagger, did ceremonies and rituals and was never without her string of garlic in case unwanted vampires came round for a neck-biting call. Pursued the same drug-besotted path as her partner, and along with him was arrested for heroin in Toronto, causing his subsequent charge on the same count, which almost brought the Rolling Stones to a static halt. Eventually her continued drug-taking caused the court-mandated cleaned-out Richards to separate from her, despite his unwavering love for her. After he married Patti Hansen, she remained on good terms with both of them, as well as with Marianne Faithfull, a fellow self-abusive muse, who had been involved with Jagger. The two would ultimately appear as God and the Devil in a dream sequence of the TV series “Absolutely Fabulous” in 2001. Made numerous film appearances as well over a forty year span, with her turn as the Black Queen in the cult classic Barbarella, as her most noted role. In 1977, a 17 year old groundskeeper, who had been involved with her, shot himself in the head in her bed with a gun owned by Richards. Despite rumors the two had been playing Russian Roulette, the death was ultimately ruled a suicide, although it did not stop rumors of her ongoing involvement in witchcraft, and was seen by some as karmic comeuppance for her dalliances in Satanism. During the 1990s, she added fashion designer to her resume, with her own clothing-line called Burn, after studying at London’s St.Martins School of Art and Design. Relapsed from earlier detoxing, but remained clean from 2003 on, although returned to alcohol the following annum. after hip surgery. Regularly attended AA meetings afterwards Suffered from hepatitis C, and her hip surgeries left her with a limp. Ultimately died from complications from hepatitis C, while announcing beforehand, she was ready to go if her independence was ever compromised. Inner: Very attuned to power, particularly her own, as a background figure very much in the forefront of the lives she touched. Susceptible to addiction, and always her own woman. Never thought she’d live beyond 40. Sympathy for the devil lifetime of exploring her own considerable abilities, as a creative and destructive force, while remaining a survivor in good standing of her own excesses. Maria Francesca Rossetti (1827-1876) - English writer and Anglican nun. Outer: The eldest of four children of Gabriele Rossetti (Anthony Minghella), an exiled Italian poet and patriot, who taught Italian at King’s College in London. Mother was of English/Italian descent. Along with her siblings, Dante (Brian Jones), William (Keith Reid) and Christina (Joni Mitchell), she had a very stimulating childhood, with the children competing against one another writing verse, as well as drawing. The household was also a hotbed for fellow exiled Italians, so that it served as a political and cultural incubator for all four as well. Seen as the brightest light among them, she would wind up as the most obscure. Extremely precocious, she evidenced an easy facility for academics, and developed an early passion for the works of the Greek poet Homer, although her gender curtailed her larger education. Denied formal scholling, she was taught by her mother, who imbued her with strong religious Anglican sentiments. Moon-faced and plain, she became both a governness and family caretaker, since those were the only two pathways open for an unmarried woman of her status and time. Her strong sense of domestic duty withheld her from real calling, that of religious work. Taught Italian and Bible classes, and also involved herself in religious education work, with two tomes to her credit, one of which was a commentary on the Italian poet Dante (Ezra Pound), which was published in 1871. Also wrote two small Italian manuals and published a book of epistles to her Bible class. After her brother William’s marriage freed her from her domestic duties around the family, she achieved a lifelong wish and became a nun in 1874, joining an Anglican sisterhood, although she died a scant two years later of cancer, the first of the four siblings to make an exit. Inner: Good sense of humor, and always cheerful. The most practical of her siblings, with a gift for teaching. Straight arrow lifetime of domesticity and traditional religiosity, before coming back to explore her far darker side, amidst much of the same group, who also would harbor a similar willingness to look into their own shadows alongside her.

*

PATHWAY OF THE POET AS CONTINUAL POLITICAL EXILE’S SCION:
Storyline: The literate lyricist prefers to let others take the bow for his works, while he works in their pale shadows piling up an interesting oeuvre, without feeling the need to be overly noticed for it.

Keith Reid (1946) - English poet, playwright and songwriter. Outer: Father was a Jewish Viennese lawyer who was arrested during Kristallnacht, taken to Dachau, then was made to promise to leave the country, which he did, post haste to England. His mother, who was born in England, was the daughter of Polish parents. One older brother and one younger sister. His parents maintained a Jewish home, while he was subject to anti-Semitism at primary school. Read constantly from childhood on, and left school at 15, having had quite enough of formal education. Song-writing came naturally for him, and he became a founding member and lyricist for Procul Harum, although never performed with them, much preferring to be behind the scenes. Best known for “A Whiter Shade of Pale,” which firmly established the band, and has become an r’n’r classic. Wrote the lyrics for all of the band’s subsequent singles and albums, over their decade plus international run from the mid-60’s to the mid-70’s. When the band broke up, he stopped writing for several years, and moved onto other aspects of the music business, forming a personal management, publishing and production company, as well as a record label, with a number of bands in tow, although he never managed to repeat the phenomenal success of “A Whiter Shade of Pale,” despite penning “You’re the Voice,” for an Australian newcomer, which became the all-time number one hit of that continent. Moved to NYC in the early 1980s, to become a transatlantic player, and continues as such, with any number of well-known artists covering his songs, although because he is a non-performer, his name remains relatively unknown, save for those in the music business. Inner: In the wings lifetime of letting others sing his songs, if not quite his praises, in keeping with his desire to form critically acclaimed art rather than perform it. Willliam Rossetti (1829-1919) - English art critic and literary editor. Outer: 3rd of 4 children of Gabriele Rossetti (Anthony Minghella), an Italian political exile who settled in London to teach Italian at King’s College. Younger brother of Maria Francesca (Anita Pallenberg), and Dante (Brian Jones) and older brother of Christina (Joni Mitchell). Never much interested in school, he got his real education at home with his siblings in their lively house, which was continually filled with fellow exiles. Along with his fellow siblings, he wrote and drew, and played off the intellectual stimulus each provided for the other. Extremely close with his brother Dante, who influenced him greatly. At 15, he ended his formal schooling and went to work for the Excise Board, which later became the Inland Revenue Board, as a means of helping the family’s shaky finances. Remained a civil servant his entire working life, reaching senior assistant secretary in 1869, and finally retiring in 1894, although he continued traveling around the country until 1905, assessing art works for estate taxes. Joined his brother’s Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood in 1848, and took some drawing classes, showing a distinct talent, which he never fully developed. Nevertheless, he served as the group’s secretary for 4 years, and managed and edited its journal, “The Germ,” through its 4 editions, writing perceptive critiques of contemporary poets. Quite handsome, he served as a model for some of their paintings as well, although he became prematurely bald, which embarrassed him greatly. Also wrote positive critiques for Brotherhood artists in other journals, promoting their works, while organizing several transatlantic exhibits. Over a near three decade period, from 1850 to the late 1870s, he wrote well-regarded art criticism for periodicals on both sides of the Atlantic, and enjoyed the admiration of other well-known critics for his well-wrought pieces. A close friend of Algernon Swinburne (Mick Jagger), working jointly with him, the two were also enthusiasts for the works of visionary artist/poet William Blake, who had yet to achieve the iconic status, he would in the following century. Showed himself to be an acute eye in assessing the works of Percy Bysshe Shelley (TIm Buckley), whom he idolized, and introduced the works of Walt Whitman (Allen Ginsburg) to the British reading public. Able to separate artistic wheat from pedestrian chaff, and had the fine eye to see what truly shone among his contemporaries in the art world, and what did not, as an editor and continual contributor to periodicals, as well as a periodical lecturer. A democratic republican and socialist, he was consistently liberal in his views and an agnostic in his religious beliefs. Met his wife, Lucy Madox Brown (Carly Simon), the daughter of Ford Madox Brown (Lindsay Anderson) in Italy in 1873 and honeymooned there, after wedding her the following year. 5 children from the union, including a pair of twins. His wife came down with consumption, which changed her radically, and put considerable strains on the marriage, although he remained a constant husband until her death in 1894. Outlived all his siblings, and memorialized them in their works afterwards, and then wrote his own autobiography, “Some Reminiscences,” in 2 volumes in 1906. Outlived all the Pre-Raphaelites, and eventually died of old age at home, at nearly 90. Inner: Exhibited good taste in all he did, including how he dressed. Affectionate, well-liked and generous, he supported his extended family throughout his life, and served as a hub for those more talented than himself. Gave encouragement to younger writers, and lived his beliefs. Harbored a strong identification with Italy. Acute eye lifetime of giving succor and support to family and friends, while developing his own not-inconsiderable skills in exposition and criticism, in his ongoing evolution as a voice, if not quite a face and personality, of his times.

*

PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS UNSURE CHANTEUSE:
Storyline: The dualistic diva does battle with a fearful sense of self and a need to perform and publicly work out her internal conflicts through song and story, so that her sense of creativity can continue to supersede her ongoing tendencies to internalize her difficulties and do herself in through them,

Carly Simon (1945) - American singer and songwriter. Outer: Her father, Richard Simon, was a co-founder of the publishing firm, Simon & Schuster, and an amateur pianist. Her mother was biracial - black and Jewish - and a civil rights activist, as well as a singer. Three uncles also had successful music careers. Along with her two older sisters, Joanne, who became an opera singer, and Lucy, and a younger brother, she grew up in an affluent cultured, musical household. Went to private school, then spent two years at Sarah Lawrence, before dropping out to pursue a singing career. Launched it with her sibling Lucy as the Simon Sisters in the 1960s, as folkies playing coffee houses, before the latter opted to start a family in lieu of having a public life. Continued singing to no great effect, and appeared in one film, Taking Off, before watching her own highly successful career finally take off in 1971 with an eponymous album for Electra Records that featured her first hit, “That’s the Way I’ve Always Heard It Should Be.” Won a Grammy that year as Best New Artist, as well. 5’10”, and slim with a large mouth, she was involved with a number of celebrity boyfriends, including Mick Jagger, and any one of them could have been the subject of one of her biggest hits, “You’re So Vain,” which was written in 1972, and had Jagger as a back-up vocalist. The same year, she married pop singer James Taylor, son and daughter from the union, both of whom became musicians, as well as social activists. She and Taylor had known one another since they were children with nearby summer homes. Continued churning out the hits all during the 1970s, while maintaining a high profile presence, as both a performer, and along with her spouse, as a political activist against nuclear energy. Sang back-up vocals on her husband’s albums, as well as co-wrote with him, but after collapsing on stage in 1980 from exhaustion, she stopped publicly performing to regroup her energy, as well as to confront the stage fright she had suffered throughout her early career. Won a Grammy in 1982 for Best Album for Children, and the following year her marriage ended, as did any semblance of relationship between her and her husband, much to her great disappointment. After lackluster sales on succeeding albums, she turned to doing film scores, before returning to commercial form much later in the decade. At the same time, she married James Hart, a writer, poet and businessman in 1987. Continued writing children’s books and releasing well-received albums of an eclectic nature, as well as ‘best of’ collections and an opera for young people, “Romulus Hunt,” before being diagnosed with breast cancer in 1998, which was caught in time with chemo and a mastectomy. Upon recovering she resumed her successful recording career. Inducted into the Songwriter’s Hall of Fame in 1994, and divorced in 2007. Finally admitted in 2010 that “You’re So Vain,” was about producer David Geffen, in a snit about his promoting her rival, and crypto-Rossetti, Joni Mitchell over her, then denied it. Inner: Despite always being well-received, subject to paralyzing stage fright, in contrast with the smiling, confident image she usually projects. Self-healing lifetime of trying to work out her earlier unintegrated dualities, despite fears galore around not meeting her own high standards of performance, and a continuing tendency to internalize her difficulties with self-love. Lucy Madox Rossetti (Lucy Brown) (1843-1894) - English artist and writer. Outer: Oldest surviving daughter of artist Ford Madox Brown (Lindsay Anderson). An older sister died as an infant. Her mother, who was her sire’s cousin died, when she was one. Had a younger sister and two brothers as well, one who died in infancy, and the other, Oliver (Warren Zevon), who had shown promise as a writer, died of blood poisoning in 1874, devastating her sire. Came to England with her family at the age of 1. Close with her father, while her stepmother, one of the former’s former models, was subject to alcoholism and epileptic fits. Along with her half-sister, she acted as her father’s assistant in his studio. In 1868, she took over for one of her father’s pupils, and showed an aptitude for art for the first time. Worked in water color, evincing a delicate talent. Met her future husband writer William Rossetti (Keith Reid) in Italy in 1873. The following year she married him, and thereafter sacrificed any possible career she might have had for domesticity. 5 children from the union, including a pair of twins. Came down with consumption which changed her radically, putting considerable strains on her marriage, although her husband remained loyal to her until the end. Wrote a life of Mary Wollstonecroft Shelley (Lynda Barry) for a series on Eminent English women, and died from the affects of consumption. Inner: Cultured and domestic, with an inability to integrate the two basic elements of her nature. Consumed lifetime of sacrificing her expository creativity for duty-bound domesticity, only to internalize her struggle to such extent that it negatively affected everyone around her, and led to her early demise.

*

 

Lists

1- Rulers-Ancient Kingdoms
2 - Rulers-Modern EuroAmerica

3 - Camelot Lists
4 - AngloAmerican Lists
5 - Euroroyalty Lists

6 - Show Biz Royalty Lists
7 - Show Business Lists
8 - Writers Lists
9 - Artists Lists
10 - Musicians Lists

Home Sweet Home Page

 

Biographies